Customer Reviews


16 Reviews
5 star:
 (12)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really enjoyed it
Despite not being a massive fan of Arthurian stories, I found myself almost unable to put this book down and devoured it in only a few sessions.

The story successfully weaves together an accurately mapped prehistoric landscape of key sites with the legendary characters in a way that pays close attention to the latest archaeological research, spiced with the...
Published 22 months ago by Simon

versus
3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Too Confusing
I gave this book two and half stars because I liked Parts 1 and 2, and the beginning of Part 3. Then I got lost...but:
If you are fan of historical fantasy novels with Celtic pronunciations, this is the book for you.

I am not a fan of this book. I would like to be, but I'm not. J.P. Reedman does have a turn of phrase. One of my favourites is, "Watching...
Published 17 months ago by Miss Josh Emmett


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really enjoyed it, 23 Oct 2012
This review is from: Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge (Paperback)
Despite not being a massive fan of Arthurian stories, I found myself almost unable to put this book down and devoured it in only a few sessions.

The story successfully weaves together an accurately mapped prehistoric landscape of key sites with the legendary characters in a way that pays close attention to the latest archaeological research, spiced with the author's vivid descriptions of ritual, combat and celebration.

It bounds along at a pace and delves deep into the mythos surrounding Stonehenge, Avalon, Merlin and Arthur in a way that brings them into an imaginatively clear - and plausible - focus.

It's a treat to read a novel set in the prehistoric era by an author who clearly knows their stuff.

Sequel please!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Real King Arthur?, 27 Oct 2012
By 
This review is from: Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge (Paperback)
Stone Lord is a historical fantasy,retelling the legend of King Arthur,but setting it in the Bronze Age. It's a highly original idea,adding a completely fresh twist to the Arthurian mythos.
Refreshingly,the characters aren't just 21st-century people dressed up in Renfaire costumes;their mindset is shown as being consistent with what we know of Bronze Age people-they seen spirits and gods surrounding them,every natural feature,megalith and barrow is home to a deity or the ancestors. In this setting are the familiar characters of the Arthur legend,the familiar tales cleverly intertwined with myths from the Mabinogion and Irish hero-legends. Obviously the writer knows both their archaeology and mythology. The story moves at a cracking pace,the characters are well-realized and rounded,and the ending leaves the reader impatient for a sequel.
If you're interested in well-written,original historical fiction/pagan/myth,I would recommended this book to you. If your idea of that genre is 'the Mists of Avalon' by Zimmer Bradley or one of Mercedes Lackey's books, read 'Stone Lord',and see what the 'real deal'is like.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New and successful slant on the Arthurian Mythos, 4 Mar 2013
By 
M. Geoffrey Roberts (S.W.France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge (Paperback)
'Stone Lord' is a brilliant book, and as a life-long Arthurian enthusiast I enjoyed it enormously. The unorthodox approach to the period and characters worked extremely well for me and the whole story is full of atmosphere, suspense and exciting narrative. I'm looking forward intensely to the forthcoming sequel.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best of both worlds, 21 Nov 2012
This review is from: Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge (Paperback)
I loved this book from start to finish. It was a well written, easy read. Once I started it I didn't want to put it down and found myself having to "limit" my chapters or I would have finished it in one night.

It combined so many of my areas of interest. Pre-history, legends, a landscape I love and a cracking read I could lose myself in.

Setting the Athurian legends in this era makes perfect sense but it took someone with vision and imagination to do it. Thank you J.P. Reedman. Can't wait for the next one :-)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Too Confusing, 7 Mar 2013
This review is from: Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge (Paperback)
I gave this book two and half stars because I liked Parts 1 and 2, and the beginning of Part 3. Then I got lost...but:
If you are fan of historical fantasy novels with Celtic pronunciations, this is the book for you.

I am not a fan of this book. I would like to be, but I'm not. J.P. Reedman does have a turn of phrase. One of my favourites is, "Watching the Sun impale Himself upon the craggy fangs of rock that topped the long moor beyond the deep earth cave." But as to why `sun' and `himself' are capitalized, I don't know. Even as an ancient god, they would not be capitalized.

The basic story of Arthur, in this so-called Arthurian tale (as presented on the front cover), is an interesting take on the age. We know that `Camelot' is a myth, given the time period, and many wonderful spins on these people have not included this. One such is `Arthur of the Britons'. Oliver Tobias is most likely closer to the `real' Arthur, than Richard Harris. And I know that Reedman has done archeological work and studied the latest findings, making the characters and scenes as close to what they might have actually been than in other books. However, it was difficult for me to follow.

The names are way too much of mouthful for this American. Hwalchmai is an example. This is Sir Gawain. Frag-arak (sometimes spelled, Fragarak) is another. This is Lancelot's sword. The story of Gawain and the green knight are given short shrift with an ending that leaves him with either an old hag who can turn herself into a beautiful woman, or vice versa. The inventive use of Ardu, Art'igen (Art igen, Artigen) Pendraec for Arthur Pendragon, Fynavir for Guinevere, etc. was a bit confusing. And so many of the names were unpronounceable for me. So, is this really an `Arthurian' (with no mention of Arthur) tale or a fairly good copy of it?

Reedman does try to explain much of this away in, I guess, Part 4: Historical Notes. It would have been better to have put this in the front of the book. Also, like many novels before, a pronunciation guide would have been wonderful! I, also, went on the Facebook page and tried to explain some of this as nicely as I could, but was rebuffed, deleted and sent a couple of nasty messages. Not good. I say, "Own up to your work and don't use a go-between when you know the person."

Also, I don't understand the use of Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3. I just got into Part 1 about the young Merlin (actually spelled that way), when it abruptly cut off. Part 1 runs from pp. 1 to 50. Part 2 is about the young Ardu (Arthur) and is, again, abruptly cut off. Part 2 runs from pp. 51 to 86. Part 3, from p. 87 to the end of the book p. 280, is about Art'igen (King Arthur), Fynavir (Guinevere), An'kelet, also spelled Ankelet, (Lancelot), Hwalchami (Gawain) and others, with their back stories. No more parts. I believed that this was a one-off book. As I was about half way through it, I discovered that there is another in the works. If so, why give such short shrift to Merlin and the young Art, who seems to have the only nickname sometimes sorely out of place? Or just not write about them at all and start with King Arthur, using back stories woven in, as was done with other characters?

The story of Gawain and the Green Knight turns into silliness. The boar (T'orc) is given a much larger storyline, and don't read this part if you are eating. The ongoing graphic descriptions were something I felt unnecessary.

And the mistakes in this book gave me an eyesore: misspelled words, bad grammar, hitting `enter' instead of something else leaving the first part of the sentence on one line and the second on the next line, dropped punctuation, double spacing, NO spacing, dropped capitols. While one could say it was the fault of the editor/publisher, it is also the fault of the writer for approving the book to go to print. Even as a lowly fanfic writer, I use an editor, emailing it back and forth 3 to 4 times, and then reading through it, myself, one more time after she has finished.

By page 274, if you don't know the ending, good for you, because then it's a surprise! And the ending, itself, is very unsatisfying, unless you know there is a second book coming out, however this is never mentioned anywhere in Stone Lord.

I will have to take a pass on the second book, as I have lost interest in finding out what happens to these people. I need characters to come `alive' for me and this never happened. I love a good twist or two or three, but I felt worn out by the end of the first book.

P.S. I didn't use an editor for this. Please forgive any mistakes. I do, however, take constructive criticism!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 10 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge (Paperback)
This was a present for my son and he loved it and I got it signed by the author which was more personal.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A marriage of myth and (pre)historical fiction, 16 Nov 2012
By 
Dr. Mark A. Patton "Mark Patton" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge (Paperback)
J.P. Reedman's debut novel, like Bernard Cornwell's "Stonehenge," takes for its principal setting the landscape around the iconic monument on Salisbury Plain. It is a landscape with which Reedman clearly has an intimate knowledge (her website states that she lives nearby), and this is an intimacy which shines through in the telling of the story. It is a story that is also closely informed, as Cornwell's (published in 1999) clearly cannot be, by the results of the archaeological researches that have been undertaken within this landscape over the past ten years or so. The result is a setting, both in terms of the physical landscape and the imagined culture, which is strikingly vivid and believable. Elements of the plot may be more familiar, since Reedman has embroidered, onto the warp of this remote time period (deliberately inexact, but somewhere around 1900 BC), a narrative tapestry from which leap out the figures of Arthurian heroes and heroines whose deeds were first committed to writing 1500 years later. The author's note makes clear that she has, in places, used "artistic license" to bring together the historical and mythic components of her creative project, but it all adds up to an engaging and well-paced story.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars King Arthur re-imagined at Stonehenge- with impressive results!, 13 Nov 2012
This review is from: Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge (Paperback)
In Stone Lord the tenets of the Arthurian myth are artfully re-imagined and anchored in the Stonehenge landscape by an extremely knowledgeable and well researched hand.

The result is that a remote period, often ignored or oversimplified in the popular imagination, is brought convincingly and dazzlingly to life as a flesh and blood world that is richly imbued with its own belief systems of spirits and ritual. Its people even come replete with their own myth regarding the provenance of those infamous stones!

Also fast paced, full of action and sensually charged, each chapter of this several generation saga reads like a filmic episode. Particularly praiseworthy are the highly lyrical character and place descriptions which appeal to the reader's every sense.

Far from a beginner's debut then this is a seasoned author who writes unquestionably in her own voice and style- and impressive it is too!

I eagerly await the promised sequel.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stone Lord, 13 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge (Paperback)
This is written by an acquaintance of mine. It's a good fun story. Hope she writes some more. Must get a better illustrator though!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Refreshing and True-to Metahistory Interpretation of the Ar-Thor Mythos, 14 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge (Paperback)
A fascinating read. The author cleverly locates her retelling of the Arthur story by positioning him in a late Neolithic/early Bronze Age setting which in my opinion is where this mythological figure belongs.
She shows great insight into the possible functions associated with Stonehenge and the Indo-European symbolism runs through like a common thread throughout the story.
We now know that Phases II and III of Stonehenge were constructed by the Indo-European Beaker and Wessex Warrior cultures. This was clearly made known to us by Patrick Crampton`s Stonehenge of the Kings and the later books by Leon Stover-Stonehenge: The Indo-European Inheritence and Stonehenge City: A Reconstruction
As High King Arthur, Ar-Thor or Ardu as he is known in this story wields the Bush Barrow Lightning Sceptre or Thunder Mace as a symbol of his divinely ordained regal status.
The recent 3D laser scanning of the sarsens reveals countless upturned axe head engravings, testifying to who the builders of later Stonehenge were. This story helps to consolidate that theory whether this was the author`s intention or not.
I look forward to the sequel. It is for this reason why I bought, read and enjoyed the book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge
Stone Lord: The Legend Of King Arthur, The Era Of Stonehenge by J.P. Reedman (Paperback - 4 Oct 2012)
8.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews