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10
3.8 out of 5 stars
Australian Autopsy: How England Dissected Australia in the 2010/11 Ashes
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 2 October 2011
Sports books have succumbed to immediacy. Thus even the great writers, like Gideon Haigh, have been forced to produce their Ashes views in book form too soon. Newspaper columns are glued together with blogs and the occasional overview. The inevitable repetition of the originals often makes the aggregation less than the individual parts.

Australian Autopsy is a happy exception to this. It was written only once the tour was over and has a narrative which reflects this. Tests are placed in context, views are considered and the reader emerges at the end wiser and more amused than he began. It helps, of course, that Jarrod is an accomplished writer and someone who is rewriting the way that cricket is reported. More Michael Moore than Neville Cardus, Kimber loves cricket but has no desire to applaud or join the corporate folly which now accompanies it. He writes wonderfully well about the players as people, discussing their backgrounds and skills with real empathy, but is hugely critical of the way that the modern press briefing or the sell out to sponsorship diminish these people to undifferentiated banality.

With his video diaries (see [...]) Jarrod has created a witty but serious highlight to the last three England Test series. For all but the most traditional readers, this book should be an equally compelling purchase.Brother of the More Famous Jack
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 6 December 2011
What do you want from a cricket book, especially a book about one of the greatest ever tours down under? If the answer to that question is an insider's guide to the ups and downs of the series, combined with relevant player interviews and honest observations, well written by the author, then this book is not for you. And to be honest, it wasn't for me either. It starts well, you soon start to identify with the author as he struggles to obtain accreditation for the five match series starting at the unfriendly Gabba in Brisbane and his frustrations at the ridiculous regulations can be easily empathised with. However, as the book progressed, for me, it became less and less amusing to read the sarcastic destruction of the Australian and in some cases the English team. The book soon degenerates into a `how clever can I be at witty, caustic writing?' A self indulgent spew of text. I found myself skipping pages in an attempt to get to the meat of the book. Sadly, there was none to be had and although the author managed to give his Australians a good literary kicking, I was looking for a more intelligent offering than this. Kindle? Delete!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 13 September 2011
This book is about a journalist's journey through the 2010/11 Ashes series. It is funny and packed with interesting opinions/observations about both sides. If Hunter S Thompson had written about cricket it probably would have come out something like Australian Autopsy.
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on 29 August 2012
A wierd start and a strange ending. Those could have been edited out without affecting the story. Some of the rambling Australian player desciptions could also have been edited/reduced. As is said of the Curate's egg, good in parts, giving an interesting flavour of Astralian cricket. There were too many pointless swear words. I am not against subtle and humorous use of these words, but generaly it was ovedone. I did enjoy sections of the book for giving an alternative view from more usual cricket writing. Finally, as a QC once said in court case about a controversial novel "Would you let your servants read this book?" My answer? Only if they took a chance on it and bought their own copy.
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on 27 March 2012
It's funny how writing about cricket (or baseball funnily enough) is expected to adopt a particular tone. Why? Do people in pubs talk about cricket any differently than they talk about football? Why should cricket writers be expected to strive constantly to be 'poetic' when the people playing, watching and administering the game are no different than those watching, playing or administering any other sport?
This book is good immediate, entertaining stuff and beneath all the cussing and the bluster there's plenty of great analysis of the game and the players who play it.
But just maybe the author should read a bit less Charlie Brooker.
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VINE VOICEon 26 February 2012
A hilarious, sweary and otherwise profane account of Jarrod Kimber's return home to Australia to report on the 2010-2011 Ashes series and how he became haunted by Alastair Cook.

JK reports on the cricket from the very fringes of the press box and makes a name for himself with a series of daily video blogs. If you like the blogs, you'll love the book. Of most interest to the England cricket fan is his initial concern, raised hope and ultimate crushing depression about Australia's total collapse in the series, English cricket followers in Australia being well used to seeing this type of ruthless sporting demolition, just in reverse.
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on 16 January 2012
Anyone who's read Jarrod Kimber's stuff on CricInfo or the cult cricket blog, Cricket With Balls, will know what to expect here and won't be let down.

Anyone who hasn't should really do themselves a favour.

This is a great read, all the stuff that you thought of while watching the 2010/11 Ashes series, but that no newspaper editor would be game to publish. Australian Autopsy is a brutally honest, tragically funny account about a cricket tour as viewed from well down the media pecking order, done on a budget, and while juggling a burgeoning man love.

Read nothing more, just press the Buy button...
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on 25 August 2013
Jarrod's knowledge of the game combined with his sense of humour make this a great read. It's easy to read but makes you think about the game. It's. always good to get a new opinion of the game as it's played in the 21st Century.
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on 5 February 2015
another great book by Jarrod Kimber.
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on 24 June 2015
son liked it
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