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on 15 March 2012
Despite the exciting title, this book is a collection of Dion Fortune's letters to members of her fraternity between 1939 and 1945. Faced with wartime travel restrictions which prevented them holding meetings, Dion Fortune encouraged her colleagues (and anyone else who wanted join in) to take part in weekly meditations on a pre-arranged topic. Far from being an attempt to wage war through occult methods, the meditations focus solely on the positive - boosting morale, sowing seeds of accord and co-operation, and visualising a return to harmony through national archetypes and the sovereignty of the land - for example by connecting with the mythical archetypes of Britain through an imaginary journey into Glastonbury Tor. If you were hoping to read about her cursing aeroplanes out of the sky and grappling with Hitler on the astral plane then you might be disappointed. However, if you're looking for a practical description of Dion Fortune's meditation techniques and magical work, her trance mediumship and a glimpse into the working of her Society, there's a great deal of valuable material in here, much of which can still be used today. The book also shows something of Dion Fortune as a person, as, for example, when their headquarters was hit by a bomb just days after she'd asked members to pray for its protection - which, despite her narrow escape from injury, she was cheerfully able to joke about.
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VINE VOICEon 13 March 2012
regardless of ones views on occult sciences being used to repel invaders, there is no doubt that DF was one of the unsung geniuses of that era. Not only for her forward thinking in the aforementioned matter but because DF was also a very practical lady. She was no airy fairy believer in magic, her techniques were grounded in solid sense and experience. Including the fact that she pioneered soy as a crop which helped the war effort trememdously. This book is a really good read and certainly gave me food for thought!
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on 20 October 2013
Violet Frith, Gareth Knight and all the others who laboured in the darkness of the 1930's deserve our thanks as we take our turn in the lifeboat.
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on 30 September 2014
It filled som gaps in my search.... i thank her for the wonderful work she did .......and no one had a clue.
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on 2 January 2015
It is not quite what I thought - Dion Fortune rather than any insight
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VINE VOICEon 5 September 2012
A video review by Alex Sumner, novelist and writer on the occult.

I am an astrologer, tarot reader and ceremonial magician. Coincidentally, the first book I ever read on the occult was by Dion Fortune, so I have been a fan of her writing from the outset. I am pleased to say I was not disappointed by this volume.

I am the author of "The Magus Trilogy" of books: The Magus,Opus Secunda, and Licence To Depart. My latest novel, This Is Not A Fairy Story, has just been published.
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