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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Why is it even Neo-Primitive art forms have to shoot it out?"
A deeply eccentric odds `n' sods collection of 90s Dredd material from various specials, annuals and yearbooks, `Restricted Files 3' is far better than you might reasonably expect, particularly given the highly variable quality of 2000AD strips from that era. That's not to write the decade off, however: as this volume proves, there were diamonds among the dross. In fact,...
Published on 9 Aug 2011 by G. Meldrum

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Dredd's best, but some minor gems in there.
The Restricted Files are, by their very nature, pretty scattershot and can be hit and miss. There are more hits here than in some of the other volumes, but you'll find more consistent thrills in the Case Files collections.

Must have oddities for the hardcore, far from essential otherwise.
Published 8 months ago by Superbeasto


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Why is it even Neo-Primitive art forms have to shoot it out?", 9 Aug 2011
By 
G. Meldrum (Scotland, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Judge Dredd - Restricted Files: v. 3 (2000 Ad) (Paperback)
A deeply eccentric odds `n' sods collection of 90s Dredd material from various specials, annuals and yearbooks, `Restricted Files 3' is far better than you might reasonably expect, particularly given the highly variable quality of 2000AD strips from that era. That's not to write the decade off, however: as this volume proves, there were diamonds among the dross. In fact, in many ways, this collection may prove superior to contemporary volumes of the Complete Case Files, largely because whilst Dredd-creator John Wagner was absent from the weekly prog, he was still making his presence felt in other branches of the Dredd empire: though he authors 9 of the 26 tales herein, several of those run to extended length and tend to dominate the collection in terms of quality. With Alan Grant adding at least 7 more (possibly 8, as whilst `Sleeping Mutie' is uncredited, I'm pretty sure it's Grant), `Restricted Files' remains surprisingly old-school.

The volume begins with Grant's `Carry On Judging', an artistic tour de force by Cliff Robinson, which sees Sid, Babs, Hattie and co appearing in a cinematic send-up of Mega-City life. It starts brilliantly, but never completely capitalises on the full potential of the idea. Next is Grant's forgettable `Beyond the Alley of the Ultra-Vixens', featuring anti-grav lady-wrestling. This one's livened up by what could be described as the `good girl' art of David Roach, whose biggest claim to fame has to be his oft-sublime rendering of Judge Anderson's posterior in her solo strip. Grant's similarly lightweight `Computer Warrior' follows, with Ron Smith on art, and then it's `Sleeping Mutie', a witty nuclear fairytale sporting some fine pen and ink work by Paul Marshall. Marshall also later draws Grant's `Jonathan Livingstone Dog-Vulture', the hapless tale of the titular dog-vulture, written with open apologies to Richard Bach. Wagner's `Top Dogs' is next up, and is probably one of the main reasons to buy this collection, being the first crossover between Strontium Dog and Judge Dredd. Colin MacNeil does a superb job (apart from giving Dredd yellow knee and elbow-pads), and the splash page where Joe smacks Johnny in the chops is a classic.

Next is Mark Millar's (thankfully) sole tale, `Christmas Is Cancelled', an inoffensive but weak story with Brett Ewins on art - for a much better take on seasonal Scottishness, see `Auld Acquaintance' later in the book by Wagner / Cam Kennedy. Grant's odd but memorable `Cult of the Thugee' features Glynn Dillon on art, and sees Dredd hurling a Kali-hypnotised Anderson across a room (the latter wearing a very Gwen Stacy hairband.) `Love Story II' sees Wagner and Ian Gibson return to the tale of Bella Bagley, whose love for Dredd has become more twisted than ever, whilst `The Sleeper' (Wagner / Geoff Senior) features the return of another being spurned by Dredd - Walter the Wobot! In between these tales of unrequited desire are `Juve Mutated Kung-Fu Kleggs' by Andy Lanning, Steve White and Dermot Power, which is exactly what you think it is, and Pete Milligan and Shaky Kane's insane `Judge Planet', whose tale of a disembodied intergalactic judge-consciousness has to be read to be believed.

Next up: the first of two tales by Transformers-scribe Simon Furman, `Impact Imminent', which benefits from some strong Steve Yeowell art (the second tale, `Roboblock', with art by Lee Sullivan and Kev Hopgood, is an extremely old-school-style piece.) Sandwiched between them is Dan Abnett and Mark Hadley's `The Mystery of Judge (Edwin) Drood', an inconsequential exercise in Dickensian name-dropping. But after this trio, we have Wagner's wonderful `Joovs `N' The Hood', the best thing in the whole collection, a tale of juve warfare presented with gorgeously stylish, cartoonish art by Richard Preston & Edmund Kitsune (the latter now known as Edmund Bagwell.) Hot on its heels is the Grant / Ewins `Parallel Lines', which sees the Judda invade from a reality where they were victorious, and then it's another Wagner cracker, `Serial Killer', with art by Simon Hunter. This one sees an attempt to beat MC-1's spree-killing death-count record, whilst `The Squealer', by Wagner and 90s-kid Greg Staples concerns a beyond-the-grave stool-pigeon. Robbie Morrison's fetishistic `Avengers'-pastiche `Kinky Boots' is notable as the only time `Jack Staff' artist Paul Grist has drawn Dredd, whilst John Smith's sole entry, `Hate Inc.' sees he and Manuel Benet explore the titular assassination bureau and even manage to throw the Gila-Munja into the mix. That leaves Wagner and painterly genius John Burns exploring the world of art from the inside in `Virtual Unreality', whilst Grant and Dean Ormston take a trip into Dredd's subconscious in `Nightmare Man'. Wagner and Staples return with `Mr. Nice Guy', in which Dredd bullies school children, and the volume ends on a bum note with `Cage of Knives', whose fine Paul Marshall art cannot save a dull Alan McKenzie script.

Phew! As the sketchy synopses above no doubt suggest, this is definitely an atypical collection of oddities and peculiarities, but definitely worth it for the extended length Wagner stories, and of course invaluable for collectors. You'll all have your own favourites in this treasure trove. Just watch out for those Neo-Primitive art forms - they're packing heat!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Dredd but not everyone's cup of tea., 8 Dec 2012
By 
M. Crossman (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Judge Dredd - Restricted Files: v. 3 (2000 Ad) (Paperback)
Some good one note stories but not up to the standard of the earlier volumes.
If you are purchasing these case files and are new to the world of Dredd then I suggest that the first 10 volumes of the regular series plus the first restricted files volume are musts to buy before dipping into this volume.
Still highly enjoyable.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not Dredd's best, but some minor gems in there., 12 Dec 2013
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This review is from: Judge Dredd - Restricted Files: v. 3 (2000 Ad) (Paperback)
The Restricted Files are, by their very nature, pretty scattershot and can be hit and miss. There are more hits here than in some of the other volumes, but you'll find more consistent thrills in the Case Files collections.

Must have oddities for the hardcore, far from essential otherwise.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good Ol Joe, keeps truckin', 31 May 2012
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J. Westrupp "artlover" (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Judge Dredd - Restricted Files: v. 3 (2000 Ad) (Paperback)
A good selection of stories, although I wish the binding wasnt so tight as you miss some of the words and pictures towards the spine. But a good collection of stories if you want to dip in and out.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars i want to be dredd in my next life, 25 July 2011
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P. barton (LONDON) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Judge Dredd - Restricted Files: v. 3 (2000 Ad) (Paperback)
third volume in the restricted files, a good mix of stuff from various xmas specials and other sources, quality printing and artwork but as i have said before sometimes the artwork can be a little childish , i prefer the crisp clean and more adult artwork to some of the silly over coloured stuff , i wish rebel would publish the banned "mcdonalds" episode again, oneday maybe who knows
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Judge Dredd - Restricted Files: v. 3 (2000 Ad)
Judge Dredd - Restricted Files: v. 3 (2000 Ad) by Simon Furnan (Paperback - 21 July 2011)
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