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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Before the Pyramids
What I mainly like about this book is simple: you can verify everything contained in it quite easily. In fact both authors, in the "Introduction" part, suggest for the reader to do so, as anyone with Internet access will be able to put those ideas to the test. Based on a very thorough research, the book is suggesting a connection between ancient Egypt and Neolithic...
Published on 27 Jun 2012 by Koriel Tannhauser

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ancient measurements rediscovered
Fascinating theory's on the subject of the megalithic yard and French metre.book gets off to a flying start,however it's not too long before Chris knights Masonic roots and confirmation bias comes creeping into the picture.good read but the Masonic influence in the author is a bit much to take at times
Published 18 months ago by Jokechoke


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Before the Pyramids, 27 Jun 2012
By 
Koriel Tannhauser (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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What I mainly like about this book is simple: you can verify everything contained in it quite easily. In fact both authors, in the "Introduction" part, suggest for the reader to do so, as anyone with Internet access will be able to put those ideas to the test. Based on a very thorough research, the book is suggesting a connection between ancient Egypt and Neolithic Britain (especially when one look at something like The Thornborough henges, a perfect copy of the stars of Orion's Belt), and that the plan of the Giza's pyramid complex was copied from another, much older sacred site in England.

They are also showing that Pyramids at Giza were, beyond any doubt, built on a precise astronomical model of Orion and that building them did in fact require an exact knowledge of the Earth's dimensions (both of those points, should be quite obvious for anybody interested in those subjects - especially people familiar with Robert Bauval books).

Along the way, the book is also discussing various different topics such as: early beliefs of ancient Egyptians, work of Alexander Thom related to "Megalithic Yard" measuring system (it's strange that this is now widely accepted fact among British archaeology experts), wisdom of Neolithic sky watchers related to calendar and 366 degree circle, Sumerian measuring systems, Thornborough henges (chapter 4 & 5 are excellent reading), Stonehenge, theories of Graham Hancock, Robert Bauval, Robert Schoch and Robert Lomas, connection between Druids and Freemasonry and importance of city of Bath (great chapter there), design of the city of Washington in US (and also Pentagon) in relation to the prehistoric units of geometry (chapter 12, 13 and 14 are give you a very good description of that), and many other interesting topics.

I actually like what the authors are saying in the Appendix 10: "Many academics are unaware that there are different sorts of thinking styles. They assume process-driven thinking is the only valid way to approach ideas. There is also a general assumption that if a new theory collides with the preferred paradigm it must be wrong. Awareness that there are different approaches to thinking and deduction can lead to better judgements". The more detailed explanation of those approaches is in the same appendix. At this point I could only wish that maybe someday, more researchers will adopt that approach - instead of keeping the orthodox ideas alive at all cost.

What I'm wondering about is: what if the true connection between ancient Egypt and Neolithic Britain (as both authors are suggesting that astronomical knowledge, used in planning pyramids, came from British Isles) is located somewhere even further in the ancient past? What if the knowledge that they were using at that time in Egypt and British Isles simply come from much older, ancient and long forgotten common point of origin (some worldwide civilization that existed in the remote history)? In this case, maybe the Egyptian astronomy wasn't influenced by any knowledge from British Isles at all -> but both of them simply had the same ancient source of information (thus both were using the "Megalithic Yard")?

At the end you have a great Appendix section worth reading, and short Endnotes (I wish there was a little bit more material here). Is it worth reading? Definitely yes, and in my opinion this book is a perfect complement to the author's earlier work "Civilization One". Read it (especially if you live in UK and you are interested a little bit in the "old" Britain). You won't be disappointed and you will learn something new here.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ancient measurements rediscovered, 5 Mar 2013
Fascinating theory's on the subject of the megalithic yard and French metre.book gets off to a flying start,however it's not too long before Chris knights Masonic roots and confirmation bias comes creeping into the picture.good read but the Masonic influence in the author is a bit much to take at times
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading., 21 Mar 2013
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Some interesting parts to the book especially at the beginning, however, it went down hill three quarters of the way through when they focused too heavily on freemasonry, which also appeared to be out of place at times.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another important title by the team., 31 May 2012
Knight & Butler have done it again, and how I wish that academia and museums would update their knowledge and displays to keep abreast of what our ancient Brit ancestors were up to long before anyone else known on this planet. Thanks to K&B we have better and better evidence that science and maths developed first in Britain and spread (thanks to a diaspora occasioned by rising sea levels as the ice age melted?) to many other places, seeding other agile minds from China to Egypt. A quite extraordinary claim, of course, but look at the evidence and visit te sites with tape measure, compass and protractor before deciding. A wonderful read for the open minded. Read these books or die ignorant!
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A strong confirmation for the megalithic yard. D.C. new Jerusalem?, 22 Mar 2010
By 
Harvey L. Gaspar MD (Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Before The Pyramids: Cracking Archaeology's Greatest Mystery. (Hardcover)
Alexander Thom is well vindicated in this issue. Also, we again find the Craft as the keeper of the ancient knowledge. Although I found some of the measurements not quite as accurate, the degree of deviation was not statistically significant. Of course it is not possible to measure precisely using Google since the map is a composite of overlapped satellite photos. On the other hand, the accuracy is very good nonetheless. If the design and building of D.C. was done with such ancient knowledge, and if the knowledge still exists, it appears that the desired result of late is wanting. It is hard to believe that such noble individuals are able to influence the rag-tag bunch now in Washington. I fear that today, we lost our republic forever. Hopefully, I am wrong. Meanwhile, the book is an excellent read and although I got lost in some of the math, most of it was easily followed. If the keepers of the secrets are alive and well in this era, then they have much work to do.

I also have question for the authors. Have you been able to find any other historical cities on the globe that exhibit evidence of design using megalithic units? The inability to do so would tend to add support to the D.C. evidence. Also, what motivation would encourage the keepers of the knowledge to allow it to travel to the 'New World'? Altruism at its finest? Perhaps Ben Franklin was not just chasing the ladies during his stay in Europe as has been suggested by his critics.

Congratulations to Chris and Alan for another great read. What is next?

Harvey L. Gaspar MD ret.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book, 7 Oct 2011
Some good original source material in this book, some but not too much recycling from other books. A good progression from Uriel's Machine. Hopefully this will be inspiration for an aspiring astro-archeology student, because there's lots more field work and statistical analysis to be done on the geographic correlations with other henges in the south of Britain.
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2.0 out of 5 stars OFF TO A FAIRISH START & THEN WENT DOWNHILL RAPIDLY, 19 July 2014
By 
Mrs. Judith Lugg "Judith Lugg" (Wolverhampton, England) - See all my reviews
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Interesting information about the Megalithic Yard, which is obviously a fact, however, I found this book to be rather naiively written, after having read many others by various authors on the topics in this book. It actually reads rather like a 'boy's own' type of adventure; having said this, I do realise that the authors are not archaeologists/scientists per se. nevertheless, it does come over in that vein.

The fact that they accept and state that the three main pyramids on the Giza Plateau were built by the local workforce in approximately 2500BC is a glaring anomaly in my view, albeit, it is the one put forward by most short-sighted, establishment archaeologists. I thought that this book's authors would have at least gone beyond this myopic, agenda-driven belief.

As others have said, Free Masonry does feature rather large here, and, they have not offered any definitive conclusions of their own.

All-in-all, I was expecting far more than this from some of the 5* reviews given, so to that end, have given it 2*.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Remarkable insight of a forgotten image of our landscape, 4 May 2010
This review is from: Before The Pyramids: Cracking Archaeology's Greatest Mystery. (Hardcover)
I have read various works by these authors and this one continues their energetic investigation in to the long lost science that our ancestors understood and used. At times, coincidence seems all to easy to blame for the results they have found, but as the chapters progress, it becomes clear that our ancestors were talented and guided in decipering the cosmos. An excellant piece of work and a must for all history bookshelfs alongside Graham Hancock, Adrian Gilbert and Andrew Colins.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cracking read., 15 Jun 2013
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Great and thought provoking read. If you are interested in this subject then this is the read for you. Recommended!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Most complete of a trilogy that isn't one., 21 Jun 2013
By 
P. Meulemeester (Sevilla, Spain) - See all my reviews
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Mostly a repetition of the former two books, lots of compilations and measurements.... not for the person who expects secrets to be explained
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