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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Prepare your memory...
Having finished the trilogy with this book I have but one criticism: the sheer number of characters. That would not be so bad with English names, but in Swedish, it started to become one hell of a problem tryng to remember who was who and who was a bad guy and who was a good guy.

For all that, until I realised the sad fact that Stieg had died eight years ago, I...
Published on 8 Feb 2012 by Snotrocket

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177 of 200 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A page turner - after 600 pages
If by any chance you are reading this review wondering if you might get a taster of this much talked about trilogy by diving in at the end, my advice is simple: don't. 'The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo' was a brilliantly original start to this series, and introduced us to one of the most compelling anti-hero creations in Lisbeth Salandar. The second volume - 'The Girl Who...
Published on 14 May 2010 by M. Harrison


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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Prepare your memory..., 8 Feb 2012
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Having finished the trilogy with this book I have but one criticism: the sheer number of characters. That would not be so bad with English names, but in Swedish, it started to become one hell of a problem tryng to remember who was who and who was a bad guy and who was a good guy.

For all that, until I realised the sad fact that Stieg had died eight years ago, I really thought, towards the end of this book that perhaps there would be a fourth book to the trilogy (it happened with Frank Herbert's 'Dune'). But it was all resolved, and happily.

One day, I shall go back and re-read the trilogy. It was that good.
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177 of 200 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A page turner - after 600 pages, 14 May 2010
By 
M. Harrison "Hamish" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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If by any chance you are reading this review wondering if you might get a taster of this much talked about trilogy by diving in at the end, my advice is simple: don't. 'The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo' was a brilliantly original start to this series, and introduced us to one of the most compelling anti-hero creations in Lisbeth Salandar. The second volume - 'The Girl Who Played with Fire' - lost much of the sophistication of the first, and was a lesser book for it - but actually managed to be even more gripping. This third volume could not be more different.

It might have been titled 'The Girl Who Got Lost Between The Covers', since our heroine Salander is present for only around twenty percent of its gigantic 750 pages. Without the benefit of the first two books this volume would be utterly bemusing. The scene-setting and recapping takes around three hundred pages - with Larsson introducing a seemingly endless cast list of spies, policemen and women, journalists and officials. For Swedish readers this may be more satisfying, since he appears to be fictionalising modern Swedish history through conspiracy. But for us it is largely bewildering.

And how we miss Salander. Such is the power of this fictional creation that during her brief appearances the book roars back into life. Sadly however she doesn't become the central figure again until around 600 pages in - and it is only then that the book truly becomes a page turner. Happily Larsson recaptures the vulnerable, complex Salander of the first volume, and again makes this dysfunctional Aspergers girl compelling and adorable.

But while we wait for Salander, and the book, to capture us again, Larson actually creates two further ballsy female characters, one of which proves the love interest for Larsson's alter-ego, Mikael Blomkvist. Larsson attempts to give levity to this approach by dropping in occasional and flimsy one page factual interludes about the role of the female warrior in history. It's a creaky device - and he needn't have bothered. The fact is, it's refreshing to have strong women at the centre of a thriller, and there is no doubting Larsson's ability to create powerful female characters.

Most Amazon reviews are ecstatic - but that must surely be a measure of the power and originality of this trilogy, and not of this book. The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest would have made little impact had it had been the first in the series; and if looked at on its merits it makes an adequate but ultimately disappointing last.
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68 of 77 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant closing - but not closure., 1 Oct 2009
By 
still searching (MK UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest (Hardcover)
With this, the third and final part of the utterly brilliant Millennium trilogy, Larsson brings to a close the compelling story of, what must surely be, one of literature's most compelling heroines, Lisbeth Salander. As said elsewhere, Larsson ties up all of the loose ends clearly visible at the end of the second book and, as such, this is really not a standalone book but a continuation. It is essential reading for Larsson addicts but like all addictions it will never be enough to sate the appetite induced by reading the first of the series. Gobble up this one just like its predecessors - sadly, there ain't plenty more where they came from!

Larsson's writing was obviously motivated by powerful emotions reflecting his views on certain social ills but I never felt, as I have with certain other writers, that I was being preached to. The books are moving, exciting, intelligent, compelling and superbly written (and, I imagine, translated) but above all, entertaining. The whole experience of reading all three is so affecting that the structural faults, most obvious in the second in the series, simply didn't matter - to this reader at least. Yes, I did get slightly tired with the too frequent references to women warriors from history and the utterly redundant sub plot of Berger's cyber stalker but was able to overlook these relatively minor irritants in view of the fact that there are just too few writers of such excellence around who can sustain the interest of their readers over 1600 or so pages and therefore his passing is truly to be mourned.

Now I'll wait some time to get my 'fix' and then begin with 'dragon' again.
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113 of 129 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great ending, 29 Sep 2009
By 
A. GILL "ag55" - See all my reviews
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The sad thing here is that the author Stieg Larsson is dead. At the end of the book i
felt like i wanted/needed a sequel, but realised it could never happen. Its the same
feeling experienced by the end of the second book, that excruciating cliffhanger.

As you'd expect Lisbeth Salander is in fact alive, albeit taking a bullet to the head
and being in intensive care. The same people who declared her mentally ill and sentenced her
to that instituion want her to go back there. They make her take the fall for two murders and
also the attempted murder of her father.

But Lisbeth is ready to fight back. The journalist Mikael Blomkvist and his researchers at
Millennium magazine provide invaluable help for her to prove her innocence and identify
the corrupt politicians that have allowed the vunerable to become victims of violence and abuse.

In my opinion it feels like a continuation of the second book rather than stand alone novel.
As a result its vital to read the other two books to understand the story and characters.

After about 100 pages or so the book takes off. Your subjected to new characters incredibly fast in
an attempt to explain the conspiracy against Lisbeth. The pace never gives up, its a genuinely
exhilirating read. Its a great ending to the trilogy, and it will no doubt leave you wishing for
that little bit more. Thank you Stieg Larsson.
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57 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Apt ending - leaves one wanting for more, 6 Oct 2009
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This review is from: The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest (Hardcover)
I ordered the first book (Dragon Tattoo) out of curiosity and the second one along with it (primary reason being to reach the min order for free delivery!). Was taken by surprise by the excellent development of characters and the realistic yet forceful turn of events. The month-long wait after that to read the third book was well worth it. (In this respect, very very different from the serious letdown from Dan Brown).
To me, the third book is a continuation of the second book and as such there aren't so many twists in the plot. It is more of a book that brings the story to an end providing answers to all the questions that may have propped up during the first two books. The part about the Section is very well done and the clinical dismissal of the prosecution case makes for a pleasant ending to the series.
There are a few things that could have been done better though - Erica Berger's side story seems to be completely irrelevant. Unlike with Blomkvist in Dragon Tattoo, her absence from Millennium is something that the reader does not find very important. Secondly, and this is for the whole series and not just this book, few characters (if any) seem to have any shades of grey. This is probably because the author wants to take a very clear line as to where he stands. The commendable thing is that he still does not sound preachy (except for some parts in book 2 where Blomkvist tries to defend Salander).
All in all, it's an excellent book and an excellent series that deserves all 5 stars. Thanks Stieg Larsson for giving us Lisbeth Salander.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest, 28 Feb 2011
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I had mixed emotions over whether to read this book or not because of how bad the second book was, but i remembered how brilliant the first book was so decided to part with my money and buy it. This final book was ok, just an average read. It follows on directly from the second book with the storyline and Lisbeth is in hospital. I found good and bad aspects of the plot but once again i felt the author went into far too much detail in areas of non importance. I thought that there were, again like the second book, elements of stupidity in the sub plots; like berger getting hassled in her new job, receiving emails saying she is a whore and someone breaking into her house and you find out it was some former classmate she never said a word to in high school. I can see the author wanted to write in that berger needed to leave her job and go back to millenium but he could have done it in a far better more believable way than he did. The other thing was i got sick to death of Lisbeths character as a whole, and i feel the author did not do a good job of making her a warmer character by the end of this trilogy. She was still in effect the same cold person she was at the beginning of the first book ( maybe went up one notch) but it wasn't enough and this was a huge disappointment and faltering on the authors behalf. Overall this trilogy was average but i would still recommedn the first book to everyone. I do feel though that the second and third books will be far more enjoyable as films if the writers shave down the storylines.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A fitting end for a mediocre trilogy, 3 Jan 2011
By 
Jl Adcock "John Adcock" (Ashtead UK) - See all my reviews
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Weighing in at 746 pages, The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets Nest brings the over-rated Millennium Trilogy to a fitting end. It continues in much the same vein as the previous volumes, with Larsson combining crisp journalistic writing with a meandering storyline that frankly goes on way too long. The list of characters is long and involved, although Larsson does do well to keep all the various strands running, but at times it's a bit like he's trying to spin too many plates. As far as the themes of the book go, he's thrown the kitchen sink at this one, covering topics such as: corruption in high places, the freedom of the press, survelliance, computer hacking, political power and manipulation, violence against women.

Parts of the story genuinely engage and are exciting to read, but as with the previous volumes, Larrson just didn't know when to stop. In this final volume, the main story is brought to a gripping conclusion, and then spoiled with a bolted on finale that draws together some loose strands of the plot that really doesn't work. He leaves the door open for more stories featuring Blomkvist and Salander, but sadly didn't live long enough to bring these to fruition. It's this sense of loss that hangs over the Millenium Trilogy, and I'm in no doubt that this adds to the hype surrounding the books and the reputation they have garnered.

Taken as a whole, the Millenium Trilogy is very much a case of triumph of style over content. There is too much going on, and the writing - even when it's good - is certainly nothing above any other well-crafted thriller style. There are better Nordic crime novels out there, and if Larsson's work signposts readers to those, then it will have done it's job.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It' OK, 30 Dec 2010
I'd say it's fast pace in some places, by means of the end of the book, but up until that point it was a bit of a drag. The end of the book concludes very quickly in contrast to the rest of the story. I'd give it 7/10, but I probably wouldn't recommend it.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars There's good news and bad news, 26 April 2010
By 
Peter J. Gasston (London) - See all my reviews
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The good news is, that this is *much* better than the second book in the series (which has a plot so ridiculous that the characters in the third book constantly make reference to how unbelievable it is).

The bad news is, you will have to read the second book before this one, because the story takes place immediately after that book and there are no concessions made to the new reader.

This is longer than both previous books, but doesn't feel too slack - although there are a couple of side-stories that have no bearing on the main story, which could perhaps have been dropped without anyone realising. The story moves along at a good pace (in the main) and always keeps you interested in what's going to happen next.

I suppose my main gripe is that there's very little feeling of peril; the protagonists are constantly one step ahead of their opposition, and it moves towards the climax with little in the way of genuine surprise.

Still, it completes the trilogy well (and leaves a few dangling clues for further books in the series, should the publishers decide to get someone else to write them).
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fun while it lasts..., 14 Jun 2010
By 
I've just finished the third and final part of Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy. I have very mixed feelings about these books. On the one hand they are very easy to read, are 'companionable' even, with engaging and likeable characters (especially Blomkvist). The plots aren't bad either and if not exactly gripping do hold enough twists and turns to keep you hooked.

Against this, the writing is terrible - full of clichés and repeated words and uninspired descriptions. Possibly this is due to the translation (I don't speak Swedish nor do I know anybody who's read them in the original - so I can't say) but even so, it amazes me that something so poorly written has been so successful.

I suppose the best test of any book is its longevity and although we're all reading and enjoying Larsson now I wonder if in a decade's time he'll be mostly forgotten. That brings me to my final criticism. The press keep raving about the originality of the characters/plot - but to me they seem fairly well-worn. There's nothing startlingly fresh here. And I think you need that blaze of originality if you're going to last.

Overall I would recommend them if you haven't already taken the plunge (especially if you've got a beach holiday planned this summer) - but be warned you might be left a tad disappointed. I suppose an analogy would be that the books are like a convivial friend whose company you enjoy but you don't have much in common with. It's fun while it lasts - but won't be a life long friendship.
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The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets' Nest by Stieg Larsson (Hardcover - 1 Oct 2009)
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