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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant book best read in conjunction with a study course
I bought the precursor to this book when I first encountered Buddhism. It made no sense at the time so I took it back and got a more basic book. Having studied for a few years the concepts are now much easier to grasp.
There are parts that are easy to follow in particular the chapter on meditation which will give a good grounding in Buddhism and Buddhist...
Published 8 months ago by Dr. Peter Dilworth

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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I wanted it to be better
Sorry but this just didn't do what it said in the title. It a list of sections and subsections of the mind according to Buddhism. All rather boring and confusing for someone who wants to learn. I really didn't find it at all useful.
Published 8 months ago by Mr. K. D. Lavery


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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant book best read in conjunction with a study course, 22 Jan 2014
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Dr. Peter Dilworth (St Helens UK) - See all my reviews
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I bought the precursor to this book when I first encountered Buddhism. It made no sense at the time so I took it back and got a more basic book. Having studied for a few years the concepts are now much easier to grasp.
There are parts that are easy to follow in particular the chapter on meditation which will give a good grounding in Buddhism and Buddhist meditation.
Keep an open mind and take the parts that make sense at the moment and save the rest for later.
It is currently my favourite book on Buddhism and extremely practical.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another masterpiece written by a genuine Buddhist meditation master - this is the real deal., 16 Dec 2013
This book is a masterpiece, extremely well written and an utterly essential presentation of the mind, but it is not a quick, easy access book, more a lifetime of gentle contemplation. If a book teaches Buddhism in the true depth the Buddha understood it, it will be deeply challenging, and the truth of our existence can certainly be disturbing, as another review mentions. It depends on whether we wish to look properly or go for some watered down pop version of the Buddha's gifts to our world. In all Geshe Kelsang's books he explains clearly that we, others and whole world *do not exist in the way that we normally see them*. Please read that statement again - it is a million miles from a nihilistic view - it simply and beautifully states the reason nothing quite works in our world, if we are honest, is because we are all seeing everything in a mistaken way. When we see the world in the way the great Buddhist masters are trying to help us to see it our experience will be of profound peace and bliss. If anyone is intrigued to learn a genuine path to enlightenment I would like to say Geshe Kelsang is the real deal. I would suggest you download the free Modern Buddhism ebooks and supplement your study with this one to deepen your grasp of the mind (which is not understood correctly by modern science at all). All his books deal only in an uncompromising truth that can liberate us on the deepest level. They are not interested is giving the world more easy to swallow 'fluffy spirituality'. If you dig that then a great and joyful path awaits. My pennies worth given with love.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Geshe La is a true inspiration, 24 Jan 2014
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All his books are written to make understanding easier and with concentration and effort the benefits of doing so are huge. How to Understand the Mind is no exception. Very good and a must if you really do want to understand
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book to develop greater wisdom for those who have a solid foundation of Dharma understanding, 3 Jan 2014
This is a wonderful book for those Dharma practitioners who wish to build upon their existing knowledge of Dharma. It is not an easy read by any means but if you approach it with an open mind it will challenge your views and push you to look at how you perceive the world around you. With these tools the book can open up a whole new set of possibilities and ultimately a path to real happiness.

It explains different states of mind and breaks our thoughts down into their component parts and reveals that the source of all our problems and suffering resides within our mind. Something which can be very challenging to accept. The book then shows how by understanding the true nature of our mind we can find the true source of happiness is within our mind.

The author demonstrates his first hand experience of profound objects of knowledge and shows great compassion by explaining them as simply as possible. We are very fortunate to have such a remarkable teacher in this world.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I wanted it to be better, 8 Jan 2014
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Mr. K. D. Lavery "game boss1" (dunmow, essex) - See all my reviews
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Sorry but this just didn't do what it said in the title. It a list of sections and subsections of the mind according to Buddhism. All rather boring and confusing for someone who wants to learn. I really didn't find it at all useful.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Helped me to understand the mechanisms by which all of Buddha's other teachings work., 23 Jun 2014
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Mr. M. Hume (York, UK) - See all my reviews
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Geshe Kelsang Gyatso starts by explaining what is our mind and then begins to methodically look in detail at all of its component parts. He describes very clearly what each part does (for example, intention, mindfulness, concentration and wisdom). I haven't finished this book, but already I can see how I can apply what I have already learned so far to help me improve my positive minds and reduce my delusions.
It isn't a light read, but it is presented very clearly and is immensely practical for any sincere Dharma student or meditator.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars our spiritual guide, 14 Dec 2013
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yet another inspiring book from our SG. We were at the Fall Festival in Portugal were the book was released. Will be another best seller amongst the Kadampa community.
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Badly written, nihilistic nonsense, 16 Dec 2013
Buddhism is a nebulous religion, and Tibetan Buddhism perhaps more than most. But rather than providing a thought-provoking angle to help aspiring Buddhists to grasp a complex topic, this book rambles through endless unhelpful lists, weird anecdotes and disturbing, repeated assertions. Mainly that the goal of Buddhism is to end the constant suffering of life by realising it isn't even real anyway. Best of all, to do this you just have to constantly sit there telling yourself the world is miserable and also not real. Do this enough and you'll "spontaneously realise" that the world is miserable and also not real. Eventually you too can stop existing. Yay?

This book would be better titled 'How to brainwash yourself in 27 unhelpful lists'. Although, for a good laugh, do read the condensed meaning of the book included at the back. It looks like the answer sheet for the most insane test ever devised.

If you want existentialism, read Satre. At least he's intelligent and eloquent.
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How to Understand the Mind: The Nature and Power of the Mind
How to Understand the Mind: The Nature and Power of the Mind by Kelsang Gyatso Geshe (Paperback - 1 Aug 2014)
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