Customer Reviews


24 Reviews
5 star:
 (14)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


51 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sproutilicious
It's earnest, worthy and very very handy. Written from the heart with a lot of very simple and easy to follow advice and charts on sprouts, how to grow them, and what they are good for. Plus some interesting recipes! If you want to know about sprouts, Edward is your man, it's the perfect guide, and you don't have to wade through pages of wiffle, he gets to the point...
Published on 16 Sept. 2005 by Sweet Freedom

versus
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Quite a good little book, However...
I purchased this book and felt that the information on the nutritional values of the sprouts was good. However, when it came to following the guidelines of sprouting and growing wheat grass, I just felt that it did not go into enaugh detail and was not quite as methodical as I would have liked, which would have made it easier for a beginner like me to follow the...
Published on 18 Feb. 2009 by andy UK


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

51 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sproutilicious, 16 Sept. 2005
This review is from: Sprouter's Handbook (Paperback)
It's earnest, worthy and very very handy. Written from the heart with a lot of very simple and easy to follow advice and charts on sprouts, how to grow them, and what they are good for. Plus some interesting recipes! If you want to know about sprouts, Edward is your man, it's the perfect guide, and you don't have to wade through pages of wiffle, he gets to the point. Splendid! Deborah
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


91 of 93 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars ONE OF THE MOST INTERESTING HEALTH BOOKS I HAVE EVER READ, 17 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Sprouter's Handbook (Paperback)
I always thought of beansprouts as something you got in Chinese cooking but this book has really opened my eyes to their true potential. I've always suspected that there was more to nutrition and good eating than can be judged purely by chemical analysis alone. The Sprouters Handbook by Edward Cairney has made me aware of the possibility that this may indeed be the case. The book is concise, to the point and written in easy to understand language. The chapter on plant enzymes is particularly interesting as it explains why these essential nutrients, apparently almost totally absent in everyday food but abundant in raw beansprouts, are so vitally important to our health. Beansprouts and Wheatgrass seem to be of a similar vain and there do seem to be books available on one or the other but The Sprouters Handbook seems to be the only one on the market wich covers both in the same book. I found the book very readable and considering the amount of information packed into such a small book, very good value for money. David Bellamy has written a great forward in his typical animated style wich is a masterpiece in itself. As a former pill popper, i can thoroughly recommend this book to anyone interested in trading in the pill bottle for the real thing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ostensibly just about sprouts, but actually one of the best books I've ever read, no kidding., 17 April 2010
This review is from: Sprouter's Handbook (Paperback)
I wanted this book simply as a quick reference for growing bean sprouts.... it's got a "sprouting chart" table, so mission accomplished within 30 seconds of reading the book.

But more interestingly...... I eat about 80% raw and I'm a bit health concious so I've read vegan recipe books, hundreds of webpages etc on the topic of health. But this book just gives you an instant, concise, eloquent summary of pretty much everything I've ever learn on the topic, and much more I didn't know, in literally a handful of pages - and even goes into specific enzymes, pH ranges and pancreas sizes discussing the digestive system and immune system, in the chapter entitled "the magic of plant enzymes".... in 7 and a half tiny pages!!!

A 10 year old kid could read this book and then possess more knowledge than your average 50 year old on the topic of health.

I'm gutted I didn't read this book years ago!

I now have 3 books I suggest any human being capable of reading English reads, and this is one of them.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Almost perfect, 31 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Sprouters Handbook (Paperback)
History: I’ve been reading and reviewing books on acid/alkaline balance (and diet in general) and have inevitably come to sprouting.

Edward Cairney’s format is my delight. His book is succinct, logically ordered, has tables and an index, but I’m only giving it 4 stars. Why? Firstly, I’m particularly interested in soyabeans, and, although there are a number of references in the index, only one has its corresponding text present, still present, I suspect. Too me, it looks as though it was intended to remove all mention of soyabeans, which led me to a hurried internet search and the purchase of yet another book, Steve Meyerowitz’s “Sprouts the miracle food”, which I’ll review when I’ve had a chance to study it. Thank you, Amazon.

It seems soyabean sprouts are best lightly steamed to be sure of ridding them of any remaining nasties. They’re also problematic to grow. First of all, the dry beans need inspecting minutely for flaws. Even it tiniest blemish that you might mistake for a speck of dirt may be enough to cause trouble later. I use a pair of reading glasses of a much stronger prescription than my own. Then the emerging sprout is extremely fragile. I’m using jars at the moment and try to be gentle. In tipping the newly sprouted beans out on to the draining board for further inspection, I first cover them in fresh water, then tip them into a bowl containing water and cushion their way out in a flood of it. And still the shoots break! Half the beans I start with will be composted or fed to the birds because of hidden flaws or subsequent breakage. An online demo recommended using a special bowl, like a colander, for soyabeans, but where to buy?. I think their relatively high oil content makes these beans the ready rotters that have to be watched so carefully.

Sorry about that digression. The other aspect of Edward Cairney’s I would question is his adherence Edward Howell’s “Enzyme digestion”, which has it that the fundus of the stomach holds food for an hour, where it’ll digest in its own enzymes (if raw when eaten) before the hydrochloric acid pours in and stops it. This is so much at variance from anything “scientific” known to me, that I can’t believe it.

A general problem is how long to sprout your sprouts and whether to do so in the dark or light. Each guru seems to recommend something different.

A matter than seems to be glossed over is keeping your sprout garden warm in the cold weather. Personally, my kitchen isn’t kept at room temperature day in day out throughout the year. The old instructions advised popping in the airing cupboard (where the sprouts would germinate in the dark as in nature), but I haven’t got one. However, I have got cats and therefore spurned cat beds, so I use the heated base of a “moonshell”, which is big enough to take two large litter trays (new), each of which holds 6 Bio-Snacky jars. Thank you, Amazon. Depending on the temperature, I put more or less newspaper between the heater pad and the litter trays, and, I always cover the lot with dark towelling tea-towels whether the heat needs keeping in or not. It worked through last winter. I green the sprouts up for a few hours before use and only grow enough for each day’s use for two people, which saves the rigamole of storage in the fridge. There’s a lot about this in the books.

Finally, I grew beautiful wheatgrass on kitchen towel in 500g Bertolli Spread boxes with holes punched in the bottoms. The trouble was, I found it nauseating, but there again, I’m intolerant of wheat anyway. I think the easiest seeds to sprout are fenugreek, mungbeans and lentilles vertes. Even alfalfa has staged germination, which means half of it will be ready while the rest has just begun.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Quite a good little book, However..., 18 Feb. 2009
This review is from: Sprouter's Handbook (Paperback)
I purchased this book and felt that the information on the nutritional values of the sprouts was good. However, when it came to following the guidelines of sprouting and growing wheat grass, I just felt that it did not go into enaugh detail and was not quite as methodical as I would have liked, which would have made it easier for a beginner like me to follow the procedures. I have managed to grow these items, but did so with a little more research into each stage of germination and sewing the seeds.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Covers the subject, but bits missing, 25 Nov. 2010
This review is from: Sprouter's Handbook (Paperback)
I have recently returned to sprouting and was looking for a book with a summary of the more unusual beans/seeds. The book seemed to concentrate on the bottle system of sprouting when today most of the sprouters for sale are the tiered tray sort. On page 95 there is a website for queries/contact which does not seem right. The book is inexpensive and a handy small size. It has a wealth of information on nutritional value of various beans. I will keep it and look at it from time to time but it just did not seem to cover what I thought it would.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Short and sweet, 13 Sept. 2005
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Sprouter's Handbook (Paperback)
Not a hard book to read. I am not a big reader and even I managed to read it in one evening. It does tell you basically all you need to know about how to sprout, and which sprouts to use. It tells you what you need, but doesnt frilly it up at all. Quite a dull short read, but interesting enough to get you started. I still felt I needed to get another book after reading it, but have used its sprouting guide with my own sprouts.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this and improve your health, 20 Dec. 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Sprouters Handbook (Paperback)
I read something in another book about the benefits of sprouting from seeds and thought I would like to learn more. This book is the perfect way to do that, with clear explanations about the benefits or limitations of individual seeds and clear instructions for sprouting. Harnessing the goodness packed into seeds is very beneficial for the body and is a simple, quick process to do. Just a jar is all it takes to get started. I am looking forward to trying the different seeds to see which ones provide the best combination of taste and benefits. It was interesting to read the comments on how seeds can provide the 'sunshine effect' on our bodies at times when there is not much sun around in the winter.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love it, 3 Jun. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Sprouter's Handbook (Paperback)
A small but perfectly formed sprouting bible, I love my sprouting and experimented with quite a few grains until I came across this book. It is dead easy to use, has some top tips and I have found out alot more nutritional information. I have even inspired my neighbours to start sprouting, it is such an effect, cheap and nutritious way to get excellent vitamins and minerals in the body.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Concise and informative, 20 July 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Sprouters Handbook (Paperback)
This is a really handy little book that tells you pretty much all you need to know about sprouting. It explains the science behind sprouting It gives different methods and the best one's for different types of sprouts. It also gives some good recipies. Could have done with some photographs of the sprout eating stages though. But overall a good and useful book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Sprouters Handbook
The Sprouters Handbook by Edward Cairney (Paperback - 1 Jun. 2011)
£4.99
Not in stock; order now and we'll deliver when available
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews