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5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Little Read
This is a super book: well researched, well written and concise. It does not take its reader for granted and presents its story lucidly and with grace. In an age of over-bearing scepticism, when opinion seems to count for more than hard facts culminating in an open minded opinion this little book is a real treat.
Published 2 months ago by Rob Lestrange

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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Unadulterated rubbish!
The `ancient tradition' that Jesus came to Britain as a boy with his tin-trading uncle, Joseph of Arimathea, is just a local fable of questionable authenticity. The earliest written sources of how Christianity came to Britain never mention Joseph, the earliest reference to him not being found until the ninth century. The original Glastonbury myth was probably invented by...
Published on 2 Jan 2010 by AG PHILLIPS


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5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Little Read, 8 Oct 2014
This review is from: Did Jesus Come to Britain?: An Investigation into the Traditions That Christ Visited Cornwall and Somerset (Paperback)
This is a super book: well researched, well written and concise. It does not take its reader for granted and presents its story lucidly and with grace. In an age of over-bearing scepticism, when opinion seems to count for more than hard facts culminating in an open minded opinion this little book is a real treat.
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5.0 out of 5 stars DID JESUS COME TO BRITAIN?, 17 Mar 2014
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P. A. SMITH "Patricia A Smith" (England, Great Britain) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Did Jesus Come to Britain?: An Investigation into the Traditions That Christ Visited Cornwall and Somerset (Paperback)
It is a very informative and well researched book and I am enjoying reading it. I wish the photos included were in colour and not just monochrome.
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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Unadulterated rubbish!, 2 Jan 2010
By 
AG PHILLIPS "An Bucca" (Cornwall) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Did Jesus Come to Britain?: An Investigation into the Traditions That Christ Visited Cornwall and Somerset (Paperback)
The `ancient tradition' that Jesus came to Britain as a boy with his tin-trading uncle, Joseph of Arimathea, is just a local fable of questionable authenticity. The earliest written sources of how Christianity came to Britain never mention Joseph, the earliest reference to him not being found until the ninth century. The original Glastonbury myth was probably invented by monks there to draw in gullible pilgrims and so swell their coffers. Such religious fraudsters would welcome this modern-day offering of rambling and irrelevant conjecture.

Alarm bells started ringing when the author cited the old-English carol I Saw Three Ships as evidence to support his firm belief that Jesus came to these shores. (The ship carrying Jesus referred to in it actually lands in the Holy Land.) Concerns grew when more equally-dubious evidence was provided by a mystical Belgian nun and (second-hand via a Cornish hotelier) an unnamed `visiting archaeologist'. At the end, Glastonbury's druids are cheerfully brought in to teach the boy Jesus a thing or two before his return home, perhaps to ensure the book's popularity within the Pagan community.

Throughout this book sweeping statements are liberally made, never properly discussed, and seldom referenced. Any quotations are usually from the writings of eccentric pre-war Anglican clergymen, rarely an original ancient source, and never from a trained modern historian. If this is `history' (the book is boldly described as such on the rear cover), then this word is in need of drastic redefinition.

I think it was C.K. Chesterton who remarked that when people stopped believing in God, it wasn't so much that they believed in nothing, but that they believed in anything. Books like the Da Vinci Code and The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail have shown that many people today will indeed believe any old nonsense if they should read it in a book.

That any publisher should deem this one worth printing at all is a sad indictment of the general gullibility and lack of education common in modern society.
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