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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Underrated
This was the first comic book i ever read but don't mistake the score for sentimentality. This story is incredibly fun with excellent art and Millar shows again why he's one of the industry's best writers. Overall it reads like the biggest Spidey blockbuster in history with all major villains appearing and Spider-man fighting to save those he loves. But the major strength...
Published on 13 May 2008 by Spideyfan

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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not what it's cut out to be
With J. Michael Straczynski writing Amazing, Paul Jenkins writing Spectacular (at the time), and Brian Michael Bendis writing Ultimate, it seemed as though there wasn't any need for another quality Spider-Man title. After all, you had three of the most talented writers on the planet who knew what they were doing, bringing more credibility and prestige to Marvel's flagship...
Published on 2 Feb. 2008 by R. Wood


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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Underrated, 13 May 2008
This review is from: Spider-Man: No. 1-12 (Marvel Knights) (Paperback)
This was the first comic book i ever read but don't mistake the score for sentimentality. This story is incredibly fun with excellent art and Millar shows again why he's one of the industry's best writers. Overall it reads like the biggest Spidey blockbuster in history with all major villains appearing and Spider-man fighting to save those he loves. But the major strength is that Millar has a perfect grasp of the Spidey/Green Goblin relationship. Read it!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 29 Mar. 2015
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This review is from: Spider-Man: No. 1-12 (Marvel Knights) (Paperback)
This is a great read for any spiderman fan, would definitely recommend this.
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not what it's cut out to be, 2 Feb. 2008
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R. Wood "ryecroftwood2" - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Spider-Man: No. 1-12 (Marvel Knights) (Paperback)
With J. Michael Straczynski writing Amazing, Paul Jenkins writing Spectacular (at the time), and Brian Michael Bendis writing Ultimate, it seemed as though there wasn't any need for another quality Spider-Man title. After all, you had three of the most talented writers on the planet who knew what they were doing, bringing more credibility and prestige to Marvel's flagship character than ever before.

Yet, Marvel decided to go ahead and bring out Marvel Knights: Spider-Man written by Mark Millar. Didn't sound like a bad idea given Millar's reputation.

Now, the story collected here in hardback format, is actually a trilogy of four-part stories that make up a twelve-part arc. In a nutshell, Spidey once again finds himself fighting the Green Goblin and this time manages to bring him down and send him to prison. You'd think that would mean Spidey would finally get the break he's been longing for. But as usual, it's a case of 'Fat Chance!'. Shortly after what could be viewed as his greatest triumph, Aunt May has been kidnapped and Peter finds himself caught between helping his arch-nemesis escape from prison, or letting his aunt die.

Needless to say, this is a typical Spider-Man story. His life goes down the toilet, bad guys won't relent, but somehow, someway, the web-slinger prevails, he gets praised as a hero by New York and everything's all right again. And there's absolutely nothing wrong with that. That's the essence of Spider-Man and that's why he's so appealing to millions of fans.

It's just given the fact that the other Spider-Man writers have broken new ground with their refreshing takes on the web-spinner, I've become accustomed to seeing something different. Mark Millar's saga isn't exactly outstanding in terms of originality, and seeing how this is a twelve-part saga, you'd think that something truly major, something that's never happened before, would justify the story being stretched over a dozen issues. As it is, it's just another hard time in Peter Parker's life that passes and all is right again, with no major, irreversible life-changing aftermath to make you go "WOW!"

Don't get me wrong. The writing is quality and I sincerely mean what I'm about to say now. Mark Millar is one of the most talented comic writers in the world, and his reputation is truly deserved. I just feel that he could have done so much more instead of panning out a tale to this extent with not much going in the way of originality.

The biggest problem I have with Marvel Knights: Spider-Man is that I see it as Marvel's version of Batman: Hush. Like Hush, this was a saga that spanned over twelve issues and lasted a year, which found our hero caught in a game of manipulation, attacked from all sides by all his major enemies, and on the verge of having his life torn apart. The premise is the same here and there's nothing wrong with that because it's written in a different style. I just don't think it works here as well as it did in Hush because, again, there's not much going on in the way of breaking new ground. In fact, it can be viewed as being rather clichéd.

That's not to say that this saga is absolutely dire. It's far from dire. One thing I'm pleased that Millar has done is bring back the Black Cat, who's been absent from Spider-Man's world for far too long. Another great thing is the fact that finally we see the Green Goblin getting involved with the likes of Venom and Doctor Octopus, which is something I've dreamt of for years. Millar also knows each of the heroes and villains intimately and writes all of them superbly, particularly Eddie Brock and Venom.

But sadly, this is where I have mixed feelings. I've always loved Venom and thought that he deserved to be treated with much more respect and care that was given in the late nineties. When Paul Jenkins wrote the 'Hunger' storyline, I was so relieved that someone had at long last written a story that brought much-needed credibility and glory to Venom. The events here undo and tarnish what Jenkins did for Eddie Brock and the alien symbiote. Not to say that Millar disgraces Venom, because he doesn't. Mark Millar writes Eddie Brock and the Venom Symbiote with brilliance but I hate how the Venom symbiote joins with other people in this saga. Especially when Brock and the symbiote are supposed to be permanently bonded now. And Brock's fate during this saga really makes me shake my head. This is NOT how the character should be treated.

My final analysis is that Marvel Knights: Spider-Man is good but not great. There's nothing wrong with how Millar's written his story, there's certainly nothing wrong with Terry Dodson's artwork, and it's definitely not one of those sagas that brings more harm than good. In fact, there is a good amount of quality presented. It's just not what it's cut out to be. And compared to what JMS, Bendis and Jenkins have done for Spider-Man, this story isn't exactly revolutionary. Personally, I'd leave it.
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Spider-Man: No. 1-12 (Marvel Knights)
Spider-Man: No. 1-12 (Marvel Knights) by Mark L. Miller (Paperback - 4 Oct. 2006)
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