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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seven Irish folk tales to be read aloud at every hearth
"Put a sod on the fire, give an apple to the child, and pour a drink for the storyteller."
"Tales from Old Ireland" is a collection of favorite Irish folk tales intended to be read aloud at the hearth of every home. Malachy Doyle, born in Belfast, retells seven of what are described as "the brightest jewels of traditional Irish...
Published on 18 Mar 2006 by Lawrance M. Bernabo

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Uninteresting. Poor graphics
I Purchased this book for my 2 grandsons. Age 5 and 10. Unfortunately neither were interested. The graphics were rather abstract, my 5 year old said all the people looked odd, and in a nasty mood.
My 10 year old's responce was, "Nan you can not be serious" which speaks volumes!
Published 14 months ago by P A G


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seven Irish folk tales to be read aloud at every hearth, 18 Mar 2006
By 
Lawrance M. Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Tales from Old Ireland (Book & CD) (Paperback)
"Put a sod on the fire, give an apple to the child, and pour a drink for the storyteller."
"Tales from Old Ireland" is a collection of favorite Irish folk tales intended to be read aloud at the hearth of every home. Malachy Doyle, born in Belfast, retells seven of what are described as "the brightest jewels of traditional Irish storytelling." After all, an old Irish proverb declares a tale to be more precious than the wealth of the world. The stories are accompanied by the illustrations of Niamh Sharkey of Dulbin, which serve to lend them a touch of the modern (but it is intense palette of colors that help these quirky characters stand out). The seven tales included within are as follows:
"The Children of Lir," one of the "three sorrows of storytelling," and perhaps the best-loved Irish folk tale. Lir was a king whose queen died, and then he was struck by the beauty of Aoife, but blind to her evil. Jealous of the king's love for his children, she changes them into swans for three hundred years. This is why the king made a law that no one in Ireland should kill a swan, since it might be one of his children, and promised a reward to anyone who could break the spell.
"Fair, Brown, and Trembling" are the three daughters of a king in Tir Chonaill. The two oldest sisters have new dresses, but Trembling, the youngest and the most beautiful, has to do all of the work. Fortunately, the old henwife comes to her aid and sends her off to church. The King of Omanya falls madly in love with her, but all he has is the shoe he pulled off of her foot (sound familiar?).
"The Twelve Wild Geese" is about the Queen of Leinster and her twelve sons. Since she had not a single daughter, she was half made with enyy for every little girl she saw. One day the queen makes an ill-fated wish and a strange old woman appears and grants it. The day her daughter is born, her twelve sons turn into geese and fly away. When the princess grows up, she learns about what happened, and tries to break the curse.
"Lusmore and the Fairies" is the story of a poor man with a hump on his back named Lusmore. He stumbles across the fairies of Knockgrafton and hears their song. This turns out to be a lucky day for Lusmore, but the same cannot be said for the greedy Jack Madden.
"Son of an Otter, Son of a Wolf" is the story of Lorcan, the son born to the youngest daughter of King Cormac. Lorcan wants to be king and is too impatient to wait for Cormac to die, so he strikes a deal with Fionn Mac Cumhail, leader of the Fianna, that will put the Son of an Otter on the throne. But he is a most hated king, and it is up to the Son of a Wolf to use Lorcan's greed against him.
"The Soul Cages" is about Jack Doherty, a fisherman from Dunbeg Bay, who meets a Merrow named Coomara, one of the men who live under the see. If you meet one it will bring you great lucky. Coomara takes Jack to dine on the bottom of the seas where he learns about the cage where the Merrow keeps all of the souls he has found. From that moment, Jack racks his brains to find a way to outwit the old Merrow and free the souls.
"Oisin in Tir na nOg" is the story of Oisin, whose courage and osongs are famous, who travels to the Land of Youth with his love, Niamh of the Golden Hair. They marry and live happily every after for three hundred years, but then Oisin gets resltess because there are no enemies for him to fight and he has no wish to sing or to play his harp. Then he hears of a beautiful princess in the Land of Virtue, which lay next to the Land of Youth, who had been captured by a fierce gaint, Fovor of the Mighty Blows. So Oisin heads off to rescue her and have one last great adventure before he returns home.
These are more intermediate level Irish folk stories, told by Doyle with enough detail that some of them might be too long for younger readers to enjoy (unless, of course, there are being read aloud by a son or daughter of Ireland, as should be the case). "Fair, Brown, and Trembling" and "The Soul Cages" are my two favorite of the collection, and if we had been invited over for a Saint Patrick's day dinner this year like the past several years I would have had occasion to read one of these tales aloud. Instead I had to just read them and enjoy them myself.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gorgeously illustrated re-telling of favourite irish tales, 28 Feb 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Tales from Old Ireland (Hardcover)
This is the perfect gift book for anyone tired of the same old Cinderella childrens' books. Seven classic irish folk-tales, including the tragic Swans of Lir( which every irish child knows) are re-told in a fresh,modern style whilst staying true to the original stories.The stories are accompanied by rich, bold drawings which fascinated my five year old.It even has a pronouncation list at the beginning to help out with those tricky irish names... a lovely book for both adults and children, highly recommended.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rich tapestry of Irish whimsy for kids, 3 Jun 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Tales from Old Ireland (Hardcover)
I recommend this to anyone. Barefoot publishes sumptuous books. Little gems for kids that provide a real feast for parents as well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Barefoot gold, 2 May 2013
This review is from: Tales from Old Ireland (Book & CD) (Paperback)
I have LOVED this book from the moment I opened it. It sits as one of my top 5 children's books. I might even like it more than my daughter! But she loves it too...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Irish tales, 25 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Tales from Old Ireland (Book & CD) (Paperback)
The stories are very nice, it's got 2 CD, so lots of evenings to look forward to listen to them.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely book, 22 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Tales from Old Ireland (Book & CD) (Paperback)
This is a beautiful book full of lovely stories. Bought for my 6 year old but the whole family like it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Charming!, 7 Oct 2013
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Gift for my son-in-law (a new Da) - found out the author is from his parents home village - just great! He is very much looking forward to reading the stories to his daughter!
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5.0 out of 5 stars great, 5 Jun 2013
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This review is from: Tales from Old Ireland (Book & CD) (Paperback)
great cps
great pictures
great message in the tales.
It can be quite difficult the vocabulary if english is not mother language of the student.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Uninteresting. Poor graphics, 5 Jun 2013
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This review is from: Tales from Old Ireland (Book & CD) (Paperback)
I Purchased this book for my 2 grandsons. Age 5 and 10. Unfortunately neither were interested. The graphics were rather abstract, my 5 year old said all the people looked odd, and in a nasty mood.
My 10 year old's responce was, "Nan you can not be serious" which speaks volumes!
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Tales from Old Ireland (Book & CD)
Tales from Old Ireland (Book & CD) by Malachy Doyle (Paperback - 16 Nov 2005)
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