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Slippery When Wet (Transita)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 25 October 2007
I have very mixed feelings about this book! Maggie the protagonist was a character I just could not relate to at all, though I understand exactly the type of woman the author was intending to portray. I wonder if this maybe because the author is a man, something just did not come across right.
Maggie a recently widowed lady of the manor sets off to Asia to dispose of her husbands ashes. As soon as she arrives she meets up with Sepen, a young Bangladeshi boy she becomes involved with. Ok nothing wrong with an older woman having a younger lover, but this relationship just seemed somewhat ridiculous. I am still convinced he was really only attracted to her money.
At times I actually wondered if I was going to be able to finish this, but the humour and the wonderful descriptions of Asia, got me to the end.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 28 February 2006
Slippery When Wet embraces riches and poverty, aristocracy of birth to aristocracy of the spirit, being wealthy in material terms to being rich in matters of the heart. It's an extraordinary scope and a journey told with a compulsive page turning beat. I'm ordinarily not much for love stories, but this one is so far beyond the margins of the ordinary that I went with it willingly. Most novels just explore our neuroses. Okay that can be amusing, but I can't take book after book of it. Or shelf after shelf of commercial thrillers either. When I find a real book I'm enthralled, and this is a REAL BOOK. It takes you breathlessly to the inner edge of the characters and lets you feel your own edges. And what characters they are. The lead female character starts out as exactly the sort of bored lost wealthy woman you've met a cocktail party. Unlike most of them she hasn't given up on life and plunges into the grit of Bangladesh, where she meets a real man one third her age and boredom is left far behind forever. And what a character he is, drawn with a tender understanding of life in teeming Bangladesh, he comes alive with warmth and sexiness and just a touch of danger. I don't cry at books, okay very often anyway. But I have to admit I cried at the end of this one, tears of relief, tears of recognition. This book is a must read. I've already read it four times. Go for it!
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 6 March 2006
I've been to Thailand. This book picks it up well, in the way novels can do. Well it does that for the temple of Wat Po in Bangkok, which I've spent a happy day in, so I am happy to believe what it says about the River Kwai. And I was intrigued to be taken to Bangladesh. Do you know the longest beach in the world? It's Cox's Bazar apparently. Sounds romantic, and this book pulls off an unlikely romance there, but it's gritty too. It's a love story between an old(ish) Englishwoman and a young Bengali man. All credible and fun. It's a good book - takes you places you've never been in more ways than one.
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