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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Hitler's Death
In his foreword to this fascinating book, the respected historian Andrew Roberts states “This book represents a real contribution to the available evidence of a momentous world-historical event … now there is a single source book that brings together every imaginable aspect of that defining moment in the history of the modern world”. I couldn’t...
Published on 19 Jan 2006 by Mr. A. C. Hammond

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Revealing, but not in the sense expected.
More of a collection of documents than a typical book, including transcripts from interrogations and interviews, this makes for fascinating reading. The transcripts of the interrogations are particularly interesting, noting the contraditcions between accounts, as well as word for word identical accounts from different people and the times of interrogations (several hours...
Published on 25 Jan 2011 by BivviBaz


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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Hitler's Death, 19 Jan 2006
By 
Mr. A. C. Hammond "tony_hammond" (Bexhill-on-Sea, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Hitlers Death: Russia's Last Great Secret (Hardcover)
In his foreword to this fascinating book, the respected historian Andrew Roberts states “This book represents a real contribution to the available evidence of a momentous world-historical event … now there is a single source book that brings together every imaginable aspect of that defining moment in the history of the modern world”. I couldn’t agree more! Subtitled 'Russia’s Last Great Secret from the Files of the KGB', this book uses previously unpublished top secret documents and images from the jealously guarded KGB archives to present graphic new evidence from Hitler’s inner circle, vivid testimony from both Germans and Russians who fought in the battle for the Reichstag and compelling evidence from those sent to arrest the Füehrer. From a large cast list of characters who actually witnessed those final days - generals, soldiers of many ranks (many senior), guards, servants, mechanics and secretaries – their cross examinations, mostly by the Soviet Authorities, reveal a subterranean world where an increasingly ill and out of touch Hitler fiddled while Berlin burned. It is interesting that nearly all these people, staunch supporters of the Füehrer as well as of the Nazi Party, seemed to want to talk about those dreadful last days to their Soviet interrogators. Whole conversations with Hitler, Goebbels, Bormann, Eva Braun and other senior Nazi figures are reported verbatim and add to the sheer authenticity of the eyewitnesses’ accounts. As the drama is played out and Hitler finally understands what all his generals and most of the people in the bunker have known for weeks - that his regime is doomed – his final collapse and cries of anguish and betrayal (against the likes of Goering and Himmler) sends a shiver down the spine. The book also contains vital classified internal reports to Stalin, plus the entire transcript of Martin Bormann’s diary. But what comes over as crystal clear is that Hitler died the way all these witnesses say he did. At the end he was a mere shadow of his former self, his health was shattered and his mind distorted by drugs and despair. There is no way a man in his condition could have got out of the bunker and lived on to fight another day. He was finished and he knew it and his friends and followers in the bunker knew it. There is even a gruesome postscript that after Hitler’s wedding and announcement that the couple were to commit suicide the following day, many of his staff, including Goebbels and Bormann, drunk themselves into a stupor and behaved in a rowdy fashion – unthinkable even a few days before. What’s more they also smoked which Hitler had always forbidden! There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that historians will fall on this book as manna from heaven. It is crammed full of historical nuggets and will enthral anyone who is still fascinated by the Third Reich and its sinister architects.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So finally, that's what really happened!, 17 April 2006
By 
Ned Middleton (British professional underwater photo-journalist & author) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Hitlers Death: Russia's Last Great Secret (Hardcover)
Recent history is always the most fresh in any person's mind and the events which led to the rise and fall of Nazi Germany remain as fresh today as they ever were for many people - even for those who were born after the war was finally over and simply grew up in it's aftermath. No other person from that time was ever more hated than Adolf Hitler and, for far too long, specific details and facts about his death have always seemed to raise more questions than answers. Not any more.

Now that the former Soviet Union is gone, the new Russia is slowly opening her doors - and her archives!, to reveal what was formerly the country's most guarded secrets. With Russian troops being the first the storm the Reichstag, it was to Stalin that all papers and diaries recovered from that building were delivered and, until recently, the world's historians had been denied access.

Now, those historians and writers have been allowed sight of the most telling documents about the final days of Nazism. In this book, we are treated to a compilation of evidence about Hitler's death unlike anything which has gone before. Evidence such as that from Hitler's own closest inner circle, reports made by the Russians and Germans who took part in that final battle, detailed accounts from those who were sent to arrest the Fuhrer, records of the interrogation of those who survived Hitler's Bunker, Martin Bormann's entire diary of the time and more besides.

Many people dismiss Adolf Hitler as a madman. Perhaps he was - but maybe that answer is just too simple. One thing is for certain, to read this book is to answer almost every single nagging question that was there before it was published.

An excellent job of research.

NM
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Revealing, but not in the sense expected., 25 Jan 2011
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This review is from: Hitlers Death: Russia's Last Great Secret (Hardcover)
More of a collection of documents than a typical book, including transcripts from interrogations and interviews, this makes for fascinating reading. The transcripts of the interrogations are particularly interesting, noting the contraditcions between accounts, as well as word for word identical accounts from different people and the times of interrogations (several hours for a 1 paragraph testimony!).
This is more interesting to read the Russian methods rather than the content of the transcripts, which can not be relied upon to be truthful.
A very good collection of documents which will be of interest to anyone with an interest in the subject.
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Hitlers Death: Russia's Last Great Secret
Hitlers Death: Russia's Last Great Secret by N.V. Teptzov (Hardcover - 31 Oct 2005)
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