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5.0 out of 5 stars NoNayNever.net - Fletcher book is a must read for Clarets
The book focusses mainly on Fletcher’s time as chief executive at the club. It starts out by covering his football career and his move into the business aspect of the game. It is certainly very interesting to read and see a man who says he would not stand in front of a group of school children and speak, develop into a regular after dinner speaker. Before this he...
Published 8 months ago by James Bird

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not worth the money
As one of my heroes from the great Burnley team of the seventies I was eager to read about those wonderful times I witnessed as a fan. Instead all I got was a very poorly written list of "achievements" interspersed with weak anecdotes. Sadly, Paul comes across as a very conceited man with his own version of history. Paul lets his political bigotry show when he...
Published 11 months ago by MR STEPHEN J HARPER


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5.0 out of 5 stars NoNayNever.net - Fletcher book is a must read for Clarets, 13 July 2014
The book focusses mainly on Fletcher’s time as chief executive at the club. It starts out by covering his football career and his move into the business aspect of the game. It is certainly very interesting to read and see a man who says he would not stand in front of a group of school children and speak, develop into a regular after dinner speaker. Before this he had a short stint in the kitchens business, a business whose failure he blames on Arthur Scargill and his miners strike!

There are some heartwarming stories in this book, particularly of Fred the elderly Huddersfield fan and Mr Arkwright the Burnley fan whose season ticket had gone “missing”.

Most Burnley fans will want to pick this book up for the accounts of Fletcher’s time as chief executive. While interesting, these accounts make more uncomfortable reading than the rest of the book. We all know that Burnley were in risk of financial ruin if it were not for promotion at Wembley and the tales in this book indicate just how close administration was. The “ambition” of some directors is talked about at length as some directors were just in it for their Saturday meal, as Fletcher puts it.

We also hear that some members of the board started to think that Owen Coyle was the wrong appointment towards the end of the season he took over at the club and that many did not like Brendan Flood’s approach to being a director at the club.

The well reported dressing room trouble before the start of the Premier League season is told in the book, with the dressing rooms being a totally different size to the rest of the Premier League. The story follows on from Fletcher’s description of getting the necessary changes for Premier League regulations approved by the board.

While the book often goes into great detail in places, such as Phil Gartside saying “See you Brendan, we’ll be coming for your manager next week” after the Boxing Day clash, in some parts you feel as though Fletcher is holding a little back. On some issues it comes across as hard to understand what his view really is. He seems to have a great respect for Bob Lord but at one point comes close to comparing the former chairman to Hitler. As well as highly respecting Barry Kilby’s cautious approach to the club’s finances yet criticising other directors for not “risking” their money. Fletcher also seems bitter about Andy Gray’s departure, despite later in the book stating that clubs cannot complain about tapping up, as they all do it at every level.

Most interestingly away from his time with Burnley, it seems as though the only stadium project that he regards as a long term success is his work at Huddersfield. Maybe this gives Burnley fans reason to be pleased we never saw the StadiArena. He speaks highly of Ken Bates at one point in the book which may not be an opinion that all Burnley fans agree with.

Overall, the book is an excellent read. It strikes a balance that few books of this type get right. It is brilliant broken up as not to bore the reader and Fletcher does not go over the usual autobiography folly of saying how such a teacher influenced them or how they would not be the same person today if they didn’t go to the corner shop on a Friday afternoon for a bag of sherbet. He keeps it to what is interesting, the stories of his playing days, stadium development and Burnley’s return to the big league. It’s a must read for any Burnley fan and a recommended read for general football fans.

Originally appeared: http://nonaynever.net/13077/fletcher-book-is-a-must-read/
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5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely book to read., 28 Oct. 2014
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I loved this man's writing on his experiences in football, and in particular his stories about his involvement in the building of brand new football stadia, in the wake of the Taylor report.....well worth reading if you are a football fan.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magical read, 17 Jan. 2014
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Thoroughly enjoyable from start to finish once you start reading its hard to put down.
Highly recommended to all genuine football fans.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not worth the money, 19 April 2014
This review is from: Magical: A Life in Football (Hardcover)
As one of my heroes from the great Burnley team of the seventies I was eager to read about those wonderful times I witnessed as a fan. Instead all I got was a very poorly written list of "achievements" interspersed with weak anecdotes. Sadly, Paul comes across as a very conceited man with his own version of history. Paul lets his political bigotry show when he blames Arthur Scargill's battle with Thatcher for the winter of discontent when it was nothing to do with either of them. The book leaps around chronologically and seems to end topics abruptly making me wonder if I'd turned a page by mistake. I tried to read nearly all of it but gave up three quarters of the way through. Very disappointing.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, 2 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: Magical: A Life in Football (Hardcover)
Bought this book for my step father for Christmas
He loved it and got straight in to reading it
The delivery was brill as i was ordered a little later than I would have liked but it arrived promptly so I was very happy
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a great read for any football fan..Magical!!, 18 Feb. 2014
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A wonderful behind the scenes insight at what happens at football clubs in the North. A must for any fan.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A chuckle on nearly every page, 9 Dec. 2013
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Mr. David V. Thomas (Leeds England) - See all my reviews
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If you want to be entertained and have a few laughs and chuckles then this a book for you. Paul Fletcher, one of Burnley's wonderful team of the seventies is one of lifes great optimists and his book is like his after-dinner speeches, filled with good memories and happy times. Football for him was indeed 'magical' and he provides a string of anecdotes and tales that will have you smiling and often laughing out loud. This is not a book about falling on hard times, drink or gambling like so many footballer memoirs. It's just a truly smiley book by a man who loved the game and is still involved through his stadium consultancy work.
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