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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Funny, scary and passionate
This book crams in so many memories about the cold war, my own favourites being the chapters about Threads and those Protect & Survive leaflets. Just as those leaflets were funny and scary all at once, so is this book. The interview with Martin Amis gives an unexpected insight into how scared he is of the bomb. This book will open your eyes to how close we've come to...
Published on 21 April 2003 by M. Burnard

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Topic, well explained but the editing .......
As a topic close to my heart I couldn't wait to get hold of this book. Being born in the 1970's I missed the Cuban Missile Crisis, so it was good to read about it in bite-size chunks. Being a pocket book it glosses over some facts but deals with most topics well. The only complaint is WHO WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE EDITING? Having watched 'Threads' I know it states that...
Published on 26 Mar. 2006 by Bazza39


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Topic, well explained but the editing ......., 26 Mar. 2006
This review is from: Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
As a topic close to my heart I couldn't wait to get hold of this book. Being born in the 1970's I missed the Cuban Missile Crisis, so it was good to read about it in bite-size chunks. Being a pocket book it glosses over some facts but deals with most topics well. The only complaint is WHO WAS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE EDITING? Having watched 'Threads' I know it states that after a nuclear war there will be 20-30 million corpses after a year lying around the UK, yet the book states there will only be 20-30. The grammatical errors go on and on and sometimes one can struggle trying to understand what the author is trying to explain. This is a shame, because it is obviously a subject very close to Chas' heart and he explains it very well, but thanks to a terrible example in editing, he has been badly let down. If however, you are interested in this subject, then buy it. Just be aware there are some areas which will be difficult to follow which are not the fault of the author.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Short and badly edited but interesting enough, 26 Nov. 2008
By 
Andy Phillips (Leicestershire, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
The reviews previously posted here seem a bit mixed and I can see why. The book is quite interesting and fairly funny, but it is short (92 pages in my edition) and there are quite a few spelling mistakes, grammatical errors and so on. It's a good start for people interested in the subject, but it won't tell you much new if you know much about nuclear weapons already. I personally would have liked to see a larger bibliography, but some of the obvious sources are given.

I'll try to summarise what's contained in each chapter:

1) Development of nuclear weapons and their use in World War II.

2) The Cuban Missile Crisis.

3) The relationship between Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan during the Cold War.

4) The 'Protect and Survive' brochure and plans for the UK government after a nuclear attack.

5) Films about nuclear war.

6) The film 'Threads'.

7) The influence of nuclear weapons on pop culture, fashion, music etc.

8) The Millennium Bug, accidents involving nuclear weapons and nuclear power and other 'near misses'.

9) Nuclear terrorism and potential conflicts between India and Pakistan.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Should have been better, 2 Oct. 2005
By 
Kevin Hall - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
What's bad: Printed on horrible paper, riddled with typos and grammatical errors;

In fairness trying to write an over-sized pamphlet on the Cold War was a fool's errand regardless of who got to write it. In most places however the author isn't terribly familar with the source material. Even if this book was just looking at the fears in the UK over nuclear destruction I was still left with the feeling the author wasn't armed with enough sources to really bring this period of Britain's history to life. Needless to say the interview with Karen Meagher, star of "Threads" is the book's only highpoint but note that the interview is only about four paragraphs in length. A very wasted effort.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is full of horrors. Editorial horrors., 29 Jan. 2006
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This review is from: Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
Eek! Editors, please note that manuscripts need reading and correcting before publication. This book is full of spelling mistakes, grammatical errors and, worst of all, is factually incorrect on many subjects.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Funny, scary and passionate, 21 April 2003
By 
M. Burnard - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
This book crams in so many memories about the cold war, my own favourites being the chapters about Threads and those Protect & Survive leaflets. Just as those leaflets were funny and scary all at once, so is this book. The interview with Martin Amis gives an unexpected insight into how scared he is of the bomb. This book will open your eyes to how close we've come to destruction and how much the nuclear arms race influenced our day to day lives and culture, sometimes without us even being aware of it. It also looks into the future and the risks of terrorists and rogue states. A short but passionate effort.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast, Funny, Furious, 6 May 2003
By 
Ali Catterall (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
a staggering amount of facts, figures and biographies have been packed into this immensely readable, blackly funny expostion (the Catholic Church's assertion that nuclear weapons should be taken to our hearts, providing they were 'clean, and of good family' is a particular favourite). An outstanding achievment: copies of which should be pelted on Parliament from a hovering Chinook, like so much critical fallout.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nuclear Paranoia- Good Outline, Lacks Deep Insight, 12 Sept. 2003
By 
Mr T G A Brown (Basildon, Essex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
I brought this book, hoping it would give me a good outline of the nuclear issue for my dissertation. To a certain degree the author does well, but at times it feels as though the author would rather seem comical than give a deep insight into certain topics.
I recommend this book to anyone attempting to begin to look at nuclear issues, but for the more educated reader this is a definite no go.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mmmm, ok but more substance needed, 9 May 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
Like the author, I too share a facination of all things nuclear, triggered by watching Threads in 1985 when in my early teens and spending the next few years in a state of terror thinking that the world would come to a nasty end and that I'd either be cooked alive or end up irradicated eating dead rats in a ruin.
This book was therefore something that I had eagerly awaited having read some of Chas's work on the net. As a short work, there is the usual blend of sharp observations, information and wit. However, there was little new material. The much highlighted interview with Karen Meagher from Threads was a real let down as it consisted of a couple of paragraphs. Also the famous work of Duncan Campbell who exposed the sham that was civil defence in the 1980's was not mentioned at all. Although Campbell's work is out of print and difficult to track down, it is not impossible to get hold of, indeed my own copy was a used buy from Amazon. Information about various secret bunkers and emergency plans did not get a mention apart from the usual Protect and Survive mickey take...
Overall, I would recommmend this to people with little or no previous knowledge of the subject. If like me, you are a little sad and read a lot about the subject, prepare to read a lot of material that you've seen before.
Nice try Chas, maybe with more substance and detail, it would be a more compelling read.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I never knew global devastation could be so much fun!, 20 May 2003
By 
Supps (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
There's a lot of dark humour to be had in this book. Which is as it should be, given the preposterously serious nature of Nukes. Chas Newkey(geddit?)-Burden gives us a well-researched and touchingly personal tour of the history of nuclear neuroses and the impact of the psychological shockwave of The Bomb on our culture. His lightness of touch and chatty style never sabotages the sober and sobering grasp he has of his subject of mass devastation. Frankie Says -- buy this book!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars God this is scary! But great., 4 May 2003
By 
JN Raeside "lemon_squeezy" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
Warning: not for anyone prone to bouts of serious paranoid depression. Chas Newkey-Burden's book is a fantastic whistle-stop tour through the nightmare world of nuclear apocalypse. If you're haunted by the image of mushroom clouds or tormented with visions of nuclear winter, read this book because it tells you exactly what you need to know and manages to do so without being too alarmist or downright terrifying. He's even managed to extract humour from the subject and you'll find yourself laughing out loud at lots of it. Specially the story about Regan thinking he could recall bombs after pressing the nuke button. Incredible! Accessible, informative, but above all, a good read.
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Nuclear Paranoia (Pocket Essentials) by Chas Newkey-Burden (Paperback - 1 April 2003)
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