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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This will really get you thinking....
This book answers many questions, posed not only by Christians but also by agnostics and members of other religions. It is ideal for students at A level and undergraduate degree level who are studying Philosophy, Theology or Religious Studies. Indeed, I would recommend it to anyone who is looking for thought-provoking arguments about God.
Published on 8 Mar 2009 by Mrs. A. M. Meaden

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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not good
If you like 'logic' of the sort that goes; 'The universe exists; everything has a cause; God is the cause; therefore God exists; therefore Jesus, the whole shebang' then it is probably quite a good book. If not, you are likely to run away, screaming. It should really be called 'The slightly critical believer's guide to God'.

Dawkins is slightly bizarrely...
Published 22 months ago by Paul Steed


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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not good, 15 Oct 2012
By 
Paul Steed (devon) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Thinker's Guide to God (Paperback)
If you like 'logic' of the sort that goes; 'The universe exists; everything has a cause; God is the cause; therefore God exists; therefore Jesus, the whole shebang' then it is probably quite a good book. If not, you are likely to run away, screaming. It should really be called 'The slightly critical believer's guide to God'.

Dawkins is slightly bizarrely portrayed early on as rubbishing the 'God as white haired giant' concept, but the picture on the front is...

More seriously, every argument is only taken one stage; Darwin is rapidly brought within the religious sphere since 'God directs evolution' so that's OK; but it fails to go to the next stage, which is 'what does that do for free will?' Without being a highly trained theologian (I was a biologist) even I can see that every mating, every death, of every creature since life began has to be controlled for this to happen. While that is perfectly possible, there is a long discussion about free will elsewhere, which doesn't mention it.

There are many, many irritations; The Blind Watchmaker is refuted mostly because it implies a non-Panglossian view of the world; thats it. There is one of the most appalling abuses of statistics I have seen to justify a belief in God. Lamarck's theory of evolution didn't include the influence of chance, as stated. Michael Behe's work has been entirely disproved on a scientific basis, but is still quoted as a valid criticism.

Look on the bright side, it doesn't defend Creationism, and regards parts of the Bible as allegorical. Whether that includes the more genocidal parts of the Old Testament isn't revealed.
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The Thinker's Guide to God
The Thinker's Guide to God by Julie Arliss (Paperback - 4 Dec 2003)
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