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This is the twenty ninth release from Big Finish in their range of full cast audio adventures starring classic Doctor Whos. It stars Paul McGann as Eight and India Fisher as Charlotte Pollard. There are four episodes, roughly 25-30 minutes each, complete with original theme music between each, and cliff hanger endings. Two episodes per disc on 2 discs, and a short booklet with some pictures of the cast and production notes.

This release is the second in the second miniseries of Eighth Doc stories, through which there is a loose story arc revolving around Charlotte Pollard's rescue from the R101 by the Doc back in their first adventure. The arc has a greater presence on some stories than others, and here it is quite important.

The Doctor and Charlie arrive in a late Edwardian town house pantry. Things are not as they should be and for some reason they are outside of normal time, and unable to interact with the house or its inhabitants. As the clock chimes they find the barriers weakened, and soon they are plunged into a deep and dark mystery below stairs, where the servants keep getting themselves improbably murdered.

At it's core is a really decent little idea, and it is superbly realised by the cast. India Fisher in particular gets lots to do, and she does it well. Charlie is now starting to lose some of her naivety and grow up a little, and Fisher portrays her journey very nicely. McGann plays Eight as a bundle of energy, having fun but with a deep compassion. And a slight inability to answer some difficult questions...

It's at first a very spooky story, which slowly morphs into something intelligent, moving and thought provoking. 5 stars.
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This story is a fairly early release in Big Finish’s range, and was released in 2002. The story is a Christmas-themed one, and I felt there were hints of Christmas stories of Dickens and his peers, with the big Victorian-type house, the servants ‘downstairs’ and the gentry ‘upstairs’. And in the middle, the Doctor and Charley, who have landed in the Tardis in a place they can’t quite work out. From landing in the larder, and finding themselves in the kitchen of the old house, the Doctor and Charley find that reality and time seem to not quite be keeping pace here. How can the water in the sink be warm, yet there’s nobody there? How can the broken jar suddenly be back on the shelf in the larder again? When the servants appear, and seem to accept that the Doctor and Charley have a place in the house from ‘upstairs’, both the time travellers feel distinctly uneasy. Where are they? And why are people being murdered?

This is a really good story, written by Robert Shearman. There is a real atmosphere in this story; the old house, with the fire crackling, the creaking doors, the servants who seem so accepting of their places. But the listener knows fairly soon that something is just not right; and can the Doctor find out how to get out before it’s too late? I thought the Eighth Doctor, as played by Paul McGann, and Charley Pollard, played by India Fisher were just great in this story. They have a real rapport and have been very well written here.

The supporting cast were fantastic; with Louise Rolfe as Edith, Lennox Greaves as Shaugnessy, Sue Wallace as Mrs Baddeley, Robert Curbishley as Frederick and Juliet Warner as Mary. A small cast, but every one of them is vital to the successful telling of the story, as the nuances of their characters are very much shown to us in their performances. There are subtleties in the story which really send a chill down your spine. I felt there was only a slight falling off in the final resolution of the story, where the protagonist’s abilities were never really explained in a fully satisfactory way for me. But it’s a story that you could quite happily listen to again, and enjoy anew each time.
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This story is a fairly early release in Big Finish’s range, and was released in 2002. The story is a Christmas-themed one, and I felt there were hints of Christmas stories of Dickens and his peers, with the big Victorian-type house, the servants ‘downstairs’ and the gentry ‘upstairs’. And in the middle, the Doctor and Charley, who have landed in the Tardis in a place they can’t quite work out. From landing in the larder, and finding themselves in the kitchen of the old house, the Doctor and Charley find that reality and time seem to not quite be keeping pace here. How can the water in the sink be warm, yet there’s nobody there? How can the broken jar suddenly be back on the shelf in the larder again? When the servants appear, and seem to accept that the Doctor and Charley have a place in the house from ‘upstairs’, both the time travellers feel distinctly uneasy. Where are they? And why are people being murdered?

This is a really good story, written by Robert Shearman. There is a real atmosphere in this story; the old house, with the fire crackling, the creaking doors, the servants who seem so accepting of their places. But the listener knows fairly soon that something is just not right; and can the Doctor find out how to get out before it’s too late? I thought the Eighth Doctor, as played by Paul McGann, and Charley Pollard, played by India Fisher were just great in this story. They have a real rapport and have been very well written here.

The supporting cast were fantastic; with Louise Rolfe as Edith, Lennox Greaves as Shaugnessy, Sue Wallace as Mrs Baddeley, Robert Curbishley as Frederick and Juliet Warner as Mary. A small cast, but every one of them is vital to the successful telling of the story, as the nuances of their characters are very much shown to us in their performances. There are subtleties in the story which really send a chill down your spine. I felt there was only a slight falling off in the final resolution of the story, where the protagonist’s abilities were never really explained in a fully satisfactory way for me. But it’s a story that you could quite happily listen to again, and enjoy anew each time.
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on 4 September 2015
The reason behind the success of Chimes at Midnight is that is seamlessly blends surrealism and humour in to a well thought out and tightly written murder mystery.

The Doctor and Charlie arrive in an early 20th century house and find themselves unable to interact with events due to a mysterious force. Meanwhile a murder is taking place. One free from the grip of the mysterious force the residents stumble upon the Doctor and Charley mistaking them for detectives set them the challenge of solving the murder. They soon find time speeding and slowing down with the mystery reset every time they reach midnight, can they defeat the mysterious force and free themselves from its grip?

It’s fantastic and unique with shades of 'enlightenment', the last episode is explosive. Rob Shearman excels at spooky surrealism and somehow manages to blend in wonderful humour without it clashing tonally. 'Jubilee', 'Deadline' and 'Chimes of Midnight' are all darkly delicious masterpieces, each and every single one.
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on 3 May 2016
Recently voted the best ever big finish doctor who. It would certainly be difficult to disagree. One of those very rare audio adventures that you just can't get to the end quick enough. Atmospheric, original and very well acted - The chimes of midnight helps cement Paul mcgann's legacy as one of the very best doctors despite his lack of tv action.
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on 7 March 2016
Wow, wow, wow, wow, wow. I cannot believe how good this play is. I should really have expected this from the high praise it has got but it still blew me away. Rob Shearman has crafted the perfect Doctor Who episode with everything sprinklers in it: comedy, dark material, sadness and drama. McGann and Fisher are on top form here and the supporting cast are absolutely fantastic. I'm not going to say much more as that would spoil the experience but all I can say is buy it now!
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on 5 October 2011
A full cast audio adventure of the 8th Doctor.

One of those stories that superlatives are not enough for. The Doctor and his companion Charly arrive at an early 20th century house in time for Christmas. And then like an Agatha Christie someone dies. and then..

To give more away would ruin the plot, but all the other reviews of this must give some idea of how strong this is as a production. Would stand well with the rest of the Doctor Who universe and beyond.
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on 23 January 2014
My first Doctor was Christopher Eccelston and I have followed every Nu-Who story since. Last year for the 50th I've watched the "Greatest Hits" from the classic series, at least 4 stories from each Doctor (accept Colin Baker). So it is with some weight behind my words when I say 'The Chimes of Midnight' is one of the best and certainly the scariest Doctor Who stories I have ever experienced. It is dark, mature, emotional and thematically very rich. It's also the best narrative for a companion I have come across. Despite only listening to three Charlie stories prior to this one she has shot up in my appreciation, the writing and performance are so strong here. McGann is great as always, having invaded my top 3 Doctors list (Tennant, Troughton, McGann) and the supporting cast are suitably creepy too. I recommend you purchase this and watch it in a dark room, allowing yourself to legitimately experience one of the only Doctor Who stories scary enough for adults.
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on 13 February 2015
Excellent audio adventure
of all the big finish audios I have listened to and I've listened to quite a few this is by far the best one the atmosphere is excellent the acting is superb and it was genuinely quite creepy this is one of paul mcgann and india fishers best performancees
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on 19 March 2011
My favourite Big Finish so far, this is a truly creepy+funny+weird story. McGann is excellent and the whole "noone goes upstairs when they are not called is kind of scary...
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