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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 23 February 2013
Another great book from Civitas!!

This book outlines the arguements against political correctness as another form of discrimination and as a means of taking and using power for groups by giving them 'victim' status. It then goes on to show how these 'victims' become the abusers and justify acting in the manner they were alleged victims of in the first place.
It highlights the deceptions and false truths of political correctness.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 14 January 2015
This is an important book. Sadly its readers will most likely be few. Arguably, there is no more important issue facing us than the ever-expanding menace of political correctness. What may well have begun as a liberal response to injustice has become a dangerous threat to our traditional regard for liberal principles and individual freedom, most importantly the freedom to say what may be unpalatable to other people. Shaw's famous statement that he may hate what someone says but would defend to the death his right to say it, is no longer guaranteed to command general assent. Indeed, far from it. We are now in the world of thought crime.

In this book David Green gives a carefully reasoned account of how one particular aspect of political correctness - victim groups - is responsible for blocking our fundamental freedoms. The tone is restrained; the arguments are carefully thought out and worded, and fully substantiated with particularities. Unlike those he opposes, Mr Green, avoids any attempt to slip into hysterical emotionalism. If there is any criticism to be made of the book, it is that so careful is Mr Green to show reasoned restraint that perhaps he understates his case, or rather fails to communicate the urgency of the situation. As an analyst he is first rate; as a publicist for his cause he may be less effective.

Nonetheless, for those who register the full implications of what the book has to say on such matters as "hate crime", the conditioning of senior police attitudes, the threats to the legal system and far from least the conscious conditioning of our children in primary schools and beyond, the impact is shocking, however gently worded.

The respect for reason that was the greatest gift of the eighteenth century enlightenment has never been under such threat. The cornerstone of democracy is freedom of speech. Rather than emerging into the clear daylight of a secular society in which reason replaces intolerant bigotry and self-righteousness, we are plunged back into a vortex of medieval superstition and sanctimonious certainties from those so sure of what constitutes the right and the good. I write this in the shadow of the unspeakable atrocities that have racked France and the civilised world, but whose lessons will never penetrate the wilfully blind and the intellectually dishonest.

We should be grateful to David Green for articulating these key issues. To conclude I would recommend two other important books that illuminate with rather more vigour these and other important aspects of the debate: "The Retreat of Reason" by Anthony Browne and "Feel Free to Say it" by Philip Johnston.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 21 August 2011
This book is presented simply and without opinionated comment as it lets the terrifying facts and anecdotes speak for themselves. It shows how desperately our democracy in the UK is damaged and how unaware we are of how silently the socialist agenda has damaged our police force. Apparently, the law states that if a minority group finds something to be racist (be it a glance or even wording from police), it must be investigated as a "race crime" because the guidelines state that racism is not what is done or said but merely the feelings of the recipient. If this sounds worrying to you, you should get this book which is refreshingly free of bigotry and gives straight facts. We should all be aware of the subtle ways in which the country is changing for the worse.
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