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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Detailed development history, very informative, excellent artwork and photographs, definitively worth buying, 24 Feb 2009
This review is from: Junkers Ju 287: Germany's Forward Swept Wing Bomber (Hardcover)
Excellent book, very detailed information about the type's origin and development history, including the post-war development period in the USSR.
The printing quality is excellent, as well as the photographs, drawings and artwork.
It could've used some more colour profiles, but i'm being picky, it's hard to find defects in this book.
Excellent value.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Will that odd-looking bird really fly with those beautiful wings?' - Herman Goering, May 1944, 1 Feb 2009
By 
Howard Mitchell (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Junkers Ju 287: Germany's Forward Swept Wing Bomber (Hardcover)
This volume continues Classic's series looking at various German aircraft and covers one of the most unusual of them all - the Ju 287, and the concept of the swept forward wing.

Chapter one looks at swept forward wing aircraft development from 1857 to 1935. Nineteenth and early twentieth century aircraft designers often seem to have copied from nature and several early aircraft designs featured swept forward wings, and by the 1920s Germany was producing gliders with them. Chapter two looks at developments up to 1945. German research into high speed flight is discussed in sometimes quite technical detail. Junkers' own research began in 1943 and after consideration of both swept forward and swept back wings the company decided on the former.

Chapter three briefly describes the little known Junkers EF 116 concept, a comparatively small twin-engined jet and then the much larger EF 122 which became the Ju 287. While the basic shape of the aircraft seems to have been settled quickly the number and location of its engines varied wildly, as the type and characteristics of jet engines were evolving very rapidly at this time. This section is very well illustrated with photographs of the numerous models used for wind tunnel tests.

Chapter four, the largest in the book at 47 pages, covers the plans to produce Ju 287s and the construction, testing and final fate of the only two aircraft actually delivered, both pre-prototype 'flying mock-ups'. Transcripts of meetings discussing the Ju 287 are given as well as the over-optimistic plans to put the design into series production. The two pre-prototypes themselves were fascinating aircraft, stitched together from a bizarre collection of parts old and new, even including the wheels from an American B-24 bomber. The few flights made are described with lengthy accounts by the test pilots. Again this chapter is profusely illustrated with photographs ranging from mock-ups of the nose section, overall and detailed views of the pre-prototypes, blurred pictures of the first in flight, and finally the destroyed wreckage of both at the war's end. Clear plans and a few colour paintings supplement these.

Chapter five discusses a minor puzzle - over a month before work began constructing the first Ju 287, Allied reconnaissance aircraft had photographed a forward swept wing aircraft at Rechlin, and the authors consider the possibilities of what this aircraft actually was.

The story of the Ju 287 might have ended with the defeat of Germany in 1945, an unusual design briefly tried on the boundary of the transition to the jet age which never progressed beyond a few flights by a pre-prototype. But there is a twist in the plot. Soviet specialists investigated many aspects of German wartime technology and decided that the Ju 287 design showed sufficient promise that it should be continued. Eventually, through a combination of offers of employment in very hard times and blatant, almost comical deception, the Soviets transplanted many German aircraft designers and engineers to work in the USSR. This ultimately resulted in the sleek EF 140, effectively a Soviet-built Ju 287, being constructed and flown. On its first flight the Soviets made sure it had insufficient fuel for its German crew to try and escape in it, and included a burly Soviet engineer who was also a member of the national rugby team to keep an eye on them! Chapter six describes the whole story in fascinating detail and again is well illustrated.

The brief chapter seven looks at swept forward wing designs post-war, and the volume is finished off by five short appendices, detailed references for sources, abbreviations and an index. As with other recent Classic titles the physical quality of the book is very high. Photographs, both black and white and colour, are reproduced crisply and informatively captioned, and diagrams are very clear.

The Ju 287 never became a combat aircraft, but its history is a fascinating one. This is a detailed but readable account of an extraordinary aircraft and the wider idea of swept forward wings it embodied. I strongly recommended it for anyone interested in the design and history of such unusual aircraft.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book but slightly missleading title, 24 July 2013
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This review is from: Junkers Ju 287: Germany's Forward Swept Wing Bomber (Hardcover)
This book is mostly about the Ju 287, BUT it also cower a lot of other forwards swept wing design, both older and newer then the Ju 287. But the cover of the Ju 287 is as deep as possible i think.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An aircraft I was aware of., 30 Dec 2012
By 
R. Stewart (U.K.) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Junkers Ju 287: Germany's Forward Swept Wing Bomber (Hardcover)
I bought this book knowing very little of the 287, saw the occasional photo that was all, it was a footnote in history no more.
This book does much more it shows the reader what was up and coming and what might well have been over GB had the war lasted another year or German research been progressed earlier..
In many ways "what if" but this aside you get a lot from this book not least the interest taken but the major powers in taking up on these advances and using those who had taken them thus far.
Hard to fault this book another nice edition to what is a good series.
just wish the publishers would do a re run on books one and two.
For the money a good buy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars All you need to know about the Ju287!, 25 Oct 2014
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This review is from: Junkers Ju 287: Germany's Forward Swept Wing Bomber (Hardcover)
Great book about one of worlds early jets!
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Junkers Ju 287: Germany's Forward Swept Wing Bomber
Junkers Ju 287: Germany's Forward Swept Wing Bomber by Stephen Ransom (Hardcover - 6 Nov 2008)
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