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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A joy to read
In a readable and personable style, David Pawson builds a clear case from Scripture, that "Israel has a future in God's purposes; that He has not finished with Israel; that neither the people nor the place have been left behind in God's purposes."

The book is divided into five chapters focusing on Matthew, Acts, Romans, Hebrews and Revelation. If you are...
Published 17 months ago by pilgrim0795

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1 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A deeply flawed book
The essence of this book is David Pawson's attempt to take individual references to `Israel' in the NT, particularly the Letter to the Romans, and to use these to prove that God has a separate plan for the Jewish people apart from the Church.

This `salami-slicing' approach to the Bible is very quickly evident in the early chapter on Matthew, where Pawson...
Published on 28 Feb. 2012 by Anorak44


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A joy to read, 15 Nov. 2013
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This review is from: Israel in the New Testament (Paperback)
In a readable and personable style, David Pawson builds a clear case from Scripture, that "Israel has a future in God's purposes; that He has not finished with Israel; that neither the people nor the place have been left behind in God's purposes."

The book is divided into five chapters focusing on Matthew, Acts, Romans, Hebrews and Revelation. If you are searching for a clear and careful refutation of replacement theology - so called, then this book is a great introduction.

"I say then, Hath God cast away His people? God forbid...God hath not cast away His people which He foreknew..." Romans 11:1,2
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book., 24 Jun. 2013
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P. Hunt "Phil H" (Croydon, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Israel in the New Testament (Paperback)
As usual with David Pawson this is an excellent biblical analysis of the role of Israel in current Christianity. I strongly recommend it.
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1 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A deeply flawed book, 28 Feb. 2012
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This review is from: Israel in the New Testament (Paperback)
The essence of this book is David Pawson's attempt to take individual references to `Israel' in the NT, particularly the Letter to the Romans, and to use these to prove that God has a separate plan for the Jewish people apart from the Church.

This `salami-slicing' approach to the Bible is very quickly evident in the early chapter on Matthew, where Pawson alights on one verse (19:28 - "...you who have followed me will also sit on twelve thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel") which, he says (p25), "by itself would be enough to support Christian Zionism".

But invoking individual verses to support a pre-conceived Zionist prejudice is very poor theology indeed! The position of Israel in the New Testament must be seen in the context of all 27 NT books, not just the 72 verses where Israel gets a mention. And what about the verses where the Jews (rather than Israel) are mentioned? Such as Romans 3:9 where Paul makes clear that "that Jews and Gentiles alike are all under sin"? Or Romans 3:29-30, where Paul asks: "Is God the God of Jews only? Is he not the God of Gentiles too?" Or what about 1 Peter 2:9-10 where Peter uses OT terminology ("royal priesthood", "holy nation", "God's people") to describe NT (ie Jewish and Gentile) believers?

If Pawson did step back and take a broader perspective on God's plans as revealed in the NT, he would quickly see that his Zionist conviction that God has a separate plan for the Jewish people is just plain wrong and un-Scriptural.

Pawson's attempt to back-solve from his Christian Zionist position is evident even in the second page of the book. He writes in the introduction (p8) that whenever Israel is mentioned in the NT, it is "always with an ethnic meaning, the Jewish people". He repeats this assertion later (p180): "It [Israel] is used seventy-two times in the NT, and not once does it refer to Gentiles." This is simply incorrect, for most commentators (including John Stott in his commentary on Galatians, and even Martin Luther) see the reference to Israel in Galatians 6:16 as including Gentiles. Pawson disputes this, without offering any substantial evidence to the contrary. There is also Romans 9:6 ("For not all who are descended from Israel are Israel"). So not all references to Israel in the NT are to ethnic Israel.

There are other fantastical claims in the book (eg that the Magi were Jewish, or that the Letter to the Romans was expressly written by Paul to combat replacement theology and anti-Semitism in the early church, or that the references to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in Matthew 8:11 prove that the Abrahamic covenant is still valid and totally unaffected by the universal saving grace offered through Christ Jesus!). These are all highly speculative and in many cases fly against the generally accepted interpretation of Scripture. They illustrate how hard Pawson is trying to stretch Scripture to prove his Zionist pre-conceptions.

But even if one accepts that most references to Israel in the NT are to the ethnic Jewish people, which is the main purpose of this book, it is utterly impossible to infer from this that God has a separate plan for the Jews. For the whole thrust of the NT, and especially Paul's writings, is that the Jews are no different from Gentiles when it comes to their sinfulness (see the quotes from Romans 3 above) and their need for faith in Jesus. This is most eloquently summarised in Ephesians 3:4-6, where Paul describes what he calls "the mystery of Christ":

"...which was not made known to men in other generations as it has now been revealed by the Spirit to God's holy apostles and prophets. This mystery is that through the gospel the Gentiles are heirs together with Israel, members together of one body, and sharers together in the promise in Christ Jesus."

The Messianic Jewish theologian Jacob Jocz put it brilliantly in his famous 1949 book, "The Jewish People and Jesus Christ":

"God is no respecter of persons. Before Him, the Holy One, men stand not as Jews and Gentiles but as sinners who are in need of grace. Jesus the prophet may be speaking to the Gentiles; but Jesus the Son of God speaks to mankind. Jesus the martyr may be appealing to some and not to others; but Jesus the Lamb of God challenges the whole human race. God's word is one word, and God's way is one if it is the way of God."

So yes, Pawson is right, the Jews (ethnic Israel) are not rejected, God still has a plan for them, they are the natural branches of the vine (Romans 11:21), whereas the Gentiles are the wild olive shoots grafted on (Romans 11:17), but it is impossible to conclude from this, or elsewhere in Scripture, that God has a separate plan for the Jews! For this would imply that the Jews had, and continue to have, a special position by dint of their birth, which is a total denial of the NT message of universal salvation to all, Jew or Gentile, who have faith in Christ Jesus (Galatians 3:28).
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Israel in the New Testament
Israel in the New Testament by David Pawson (Paperback - 7 Oct. 2012)
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