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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars psychology for the man or woman in the street
This book outlines the origins and principles behind the Human Givens theory and philosophy. I found the first half of the book rather uninspiring to read but it's well worth keeping going because a light really does seem to come on about half way through. Joe Griffin discovered a few years ago that our dreams are the outworking of unexpressed emotions from the previous...
Published on 21 April 2007 by H Crittenden

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dreaming Reality
I was a bit disappointed by this book. I thought it was going to show how dreams
I'mpact on mental health but it doesn't. The interpretations of the metaphorical dream process is explained in a rather complex and theoretical way which is not easy to understand. I became bored by the language that indicated the obvious references to what had occurred during waking...
Published 16 months ago by Ash


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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars psychology for the man or woman in the street, 21 April 2007
By 
H Crittenden "nell overland" (Kent, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dreaming Reality: How Dreaming Keeps Us Sane, or Can Drive Us Mad (Paperback)
This book outlines the origins and principles behind the Human Givens theory and philosophy. I found the first half of the book rather uninspiring to read but it's well worth keeping going because a light really does seem to come on about half way through. Joe Griffin discovered a few years ago that our dreams are the outworking of unexpressed emotions from the previous waking day and as such the brain's "recovery time". If there are too many unexpressed emotions we spend too much of our sleep time in dreaming and not enough time in non-dream sleep which is when the body achieves the physical restoration needed for good health. Simplistically put, this in turn leads to depression and increased worrying (which is an unexpressed or unfulfilled emotion in itself) and potentially other more serious mental health problems. The book also summarises the Human Givens principle in that as humans we all have a number of resources and needs ('givens') that need to be met in order to achieve positive mental and physical health. This is psychology that the man and woman in the street can understand.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Give the man a medal!, 5 Aug 2004
By A Customer
I've just finished this book and found myself yelling, 'Yes!' It's the first book about the mind I've read in ages that really has something new and profound to say.
Since I was a child I have wanted to know why we dream and whether my dreams are as significant as they often feel. I've read Jung, Freud, Jouvet, Hobson and I've looked at dream symbol dictionaries to try and make sense of dreams. But they never got close. So 'Dreaming Reality' was a revelation. Not only do my dreams now make sense to me, it also shows how dreaming takes place in the REM state, but is separate from it. It explains the role the REM state plays in constructing our internal model of reality and why our dreams are so often weird and surreal. (This is because every element in a dream has to be a metaphor.)
I think Joe Griffin really has done what someone wrote on the cover and made "one of the most important scientific breakthroughs of the last hundred years." But what really surprised me was the authors' findings about the workaday role dreams play in keeping us sane. For example, they offer the first clear explanation for the symptoms of psychosis, something I have not found yet in the many other books I've read about the subject.
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Revolutionary light on dreaming, 11 July 2004
For anyone who has speculated on the meaning and purpose of dreaming, Griffin and Tyrrell's astounding insights light up the dark corners of the mind. Not since 1964 when Carl Jung's book Man and his Symbols was published has anyone set out to write so conclusively on dreaming for a wide audience.
Jung proposed a compensatory role for dreams to re-establish 'the total psychic equilibrium'. Griffin and Tyrrell leap ahead of this to the notion that dreaming functions to cleanse the undischarged emotional arousals of the day and they explain how this happens through metaphorical pattern-matching. From this one sets off on the journey to understanding the true causes (and routes to healing) of depression.
In a moment which ranks with the most stunning in scientific discovery, they observed a patient undergoing a psychotic episode. Their linking of this to the REM state will undoubtedly provide the breakthrough to real understanding and lasting healing of psychoses.

This book is revolutionary in thought, revelatory in content and will be established as the most important twenty-first century milestone on the road to accessible mental health treatment for all. It's a must for all who live with mental illness or work for its relief.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Possibly the best and most comprehensive explanation on the nature of dreams, 16 Oct 2014
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This review is from: Dreaming Reality: How Dreaming Keeps Us Sane, or Can Drive Us Mad (Paperback)
This book offers possibly the best and most comprehensive explanation on the nature of dreams available, in a clear, approachable and entertaining prose. If you have ever felt puzzled by why we dream, or experienced an intriguing, haunting or seemingly premonitory dream, then this book can certainly help you address some of the questions about what dreams mean, why we generally forget them and the role they play in maintaining a healthy psychological balance. It also reviews the most important ideas about dreaming our culture has produced, from ancient history, through contemporary Freudian and Jungian concepts, to modern scientific theories.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars UNPUTDOWNABLE!, 3 Jan 2007
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This review is from: Dreaming Reality: How Dreaming Keeps Us Sane, or Can Drive Us Mad (Paperback)
If you are interested in psychology read this beautifully written book. It will do more than fill you with wonder at how cleverly nature solved the problem of dearousing emotions. Dreaming Reality shows why psychology is an exciting science operating at the frontier of knowledge. As well as explaining why we evolved to dream it describes several new insights about mental health, perhaps the most remarkable being about what causes schizophrenia. In a word, for the curious person, unputdownable!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 24 Nov 2014
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fabulous!
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dreaming Reality, 29 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Dreaming Reality: How Dreaming Keeps Us Sane, or Can Drive Us Mad (Paperback)
I was a bit disappointed by this book. I thought it was going to show how dreams
I'mpact on mental health but it doesn't. The interpretations of the metaphorical dream process is explained in a rather complex and theoretical way which is not easy to understand. I became bored by the language that indicated the obvious references to what had occurred during waking hours to the dreams and I could not see the referece at all.
I guess you just had to be there or dream it!
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