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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Very Gutsy Book
Windschuttle's book is a courageous effort to engage the forces of theory and post-structuralism that are destroying history as an area of interest to those outside academia's ivory tower / padded cell.
Besides taking on those who would deny the value of empirical history, Windschuttle deconstructs the decontsructionists.

Whilst the work of any human is...
Published on 9 Oct. 1997

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A point missed
Windschuttle starts by being no more than half a degree off, but that means that by the end he's miles away from his target. Making 'accurate descriptive statements about events in the past' is all well and good as a goal, but if we do not understand the thought-processes and the epistemology by which we are making such 'accurate' and 'descriptive' statements, we might as...
Published 10 months ago by Bookseeker Agency


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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Very Gutsy Book, 9 Oct. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: The Killing of History (Hardcover)
Windschuttle's book is a courageous effort to engage the forces of theory and post-structuralism that are destroying history as an area of interest to those outside academia's ivory tower / padded cell.
Besides taking on those who would deny the value of empirical history, Windschuttle deconstructs the decontsructionists.

Whilst the work of any human is always open to improvement, Keith Windschuttlle deserves the garlands and praise of students throughout the world - students who have had to bite their lips whilst the noble pursuit of historical truth has been perverted into yet another turgid, theoretical social science.

Great Stuff.

G A F Connolly
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A point missed, 25 April 2014
This review is from: The Killing of History: How Literary Critics and Social Theorists are Murdering Our Past (Paperback)
Windschuttle starts by being no more than half a degree off, but that means that by the end he's miles away from his target. Making 'accurate descriptive statements about events in the past' is all well and good as a goal, but if we do not understand the thought-processes and the epistemology by which we are making such 'accurate' and 'descriptive' statements, we might as well not bother. If Windschuttle has made anything more than an irritating dent in the armour of the likes of Michel Foucault, then I would be very surprised.
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8 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars It could have been better, 11 May 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Killing of History (Hardcover)
The killing of History first impresses the reader by the erudition of its author. Numerous and various researches are quoted, philosophical works resumed, schools of thoughts presented. Conducting his plea, the author first reviews in each chapter a major research belonging to the perspective he aims at criticising. His review appears frequently "objective" and the author seems to have had the ambition (at least for most of the chapters) to review the object of his critics adopting a neutral perspective. Then he proposes his comments trying to convince the reader that the traditional understanding of history or science has nothing to learn from the recent developments in philosophy of science. Windschuttle regularly fails in his attempt to rally all readers to his cause, mainly by the fact that he does not adopt the arguments of his opponents in order to criticise them (from the inside), in order to provide deconstructive critics. To that extent, Windschuttle does not further the debate, does not radically change it but rather offers more arguments to support his position, without breaking the legitimacy of his opponents. The killing of History may not further the debate, however, it is an impressive review of the various tendencies influencing not only history but the current reflection on knowledge and the scientific discourse in diverse disciplines.
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