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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amusing and informative
Writing in the style of short biographical tale, Alan Ward chronicles the experiences of a traditional manufacturing company - controlled by the `process police' -as they became aware of, and finally adopted, Lean Thinking. As the story unfolds the difference between traditional and lean thinking is highlighted, and each chapter includes a commentary explaining how TOYOTA...
Published on 11 Jan 2007 by Mr. Philip G. Stunell

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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible writing style and no mention of Toyota
I managed to read 80 pages before giving up. The book is written in the style of a bad novel about what your nan would call "people in business". It contains all the cliches, right down to the guy pulled out of retirement to save the day and the lovably stroppy secretary. Awful.

At the end of each chapter there are a few pages patronisingly entitled...
Published on 10 April 2008 by M. Ashford


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amusing and informative, 11 Jan 2007
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This review is from: Product Development for the Lean Enterprise: Why Toyota's System Is Four Times More Productive and How You Can Implement It (Paperback)
Writing in the style of short biographical tale, Alan Ward chronicles the experiences of a traditional manufacturing company - controlled by the `process police' -as they became aware of, and finally adopted, Lean Thinking. As the story unfolds the difference between traditional and lean thinking is highlighted, and each chapter includes a commentary explaining how TOYOTA and other lean organisations have gained a competitive advantage through the application of lean thinking

By combining the theoretical analysis of lean management techniques with the story of one company going through the process of `awakening' he presents a unique insight into the cultural barriers to change - and provides lots of food for thought. A book that will appeal to anybody interested in lean management and an excellent introduction for those who do not work in an engineering environment.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Want to transform Product Development in your organisation?, 11 July 2008
This review is from: Product Development for the Lean Enterprise: Why Toyota's System Is Four Times More Productive and How You Can Implement It (Paperback)
If you're unhappy with the way your organisation approaches product development, then this book is a must-read. Toyota has one of the most atypical product development approaches of any major organisation, yet outperforms its competitors *at developing new products* by a factor or four or more. Michael Kennedy tells us how they do it - and even better than that he also describes in detail how your own organisation can achieve similar outstanding results too. Highly recommended.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible writing style and no mention of Toyota, 10 April 2008
By 
M. Ashford "Mashford" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Product Development for the Lean Enterprise: Why Toyota's System Is Four Times More Productive and How You Can Implement It (Paperback)
I managed to read 80 pages before giving up. The book is written in the style of a bad novel about what your nan would call "people in business". It contains all the cliches, right down to the guy pulled out of retirement to save the day and the lovably stroppy secretary. Awful.

At the end of each chapter there are a few pages patronisingly entitled "Discussion". The trite headings say it all - "People need to believe in the change", "Managers must be strong." Oh dear.

I'd learned nothing about Toyota's best practice by the time I binned this book...the author appears to be shamelessly freeloading on a success story into which he has no insight. Avoid.
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