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45 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Impeccable literary quality allied to serious social comment
I read this book without having seen any of the reviews here on Amazon. As a lover of good literature I have to say that Jean Raspail is a writer whose works I will seek out, as the standard is of the highest. I think this book will become a classic for two reasons. In the first place the writing itself is of exceptional quality. Secondly, one hopes that the warning...
Published on 25 July 2003 by Capt I. McRae

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5 of 36 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting issues but premise exaggerated
This thought-provoking book presents a hysterical nightmare image of third world immigration. Suppose France did have to accept a million Indian immigrants? In spite of that massive number, would it really be TEOTWAKI for several hundred million Western Europeans, or even 45 million Frenchmen? I doubt it. I find the prose somewhat turgid and can't exactly tell...
Published on 7 Jun 1999


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45 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Impeccable literary quality allied to serious social comment, 25 July 2003
By 
Capt I. McRae "The Ancient Mariner" (Angus, Scotland.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Camp of the Saints (Paperback)
I read this book without having seen any of the reviews here on Amazon. As a lover of good literature I have to say that Jean Raspail is a writer whose works I will seek out, as the standard is of the highest. I think this book will become a classic for two reasons. In the first place the writing itself is of exceptional quality. Secondly, one hopes that the warning he gives to European society and culture goes heeded. If so, he will be remembered through history not only for his literary quality, but also for his courage in taking a non-politically correct subject and tastefully dealing with it in such a way that one is left in no doubt as to the seriousness of the situation. As usual the liberal left have demonised Raspail, calling him names and abusing him without giving any answer to the issues he raises. This is because they have no logical argument to put forth. READ THIS BOOK. IT IS PROBABLY ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT BOOKS OF OUR TIMES.
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39 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Raspail's nightmare is a GOAL for the "Diversity" mongers, 24 April 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Camp of the Saints (Paperback)
This is a book that will get 4/5 stars or 1: total polarization. Raspail wrote it was a WARNING; for the P-C "Diversity" mongers, it's a GOAL! He exposes the inner ROT of the West, the vectors of that Spiritual AIDS called "Multi-Culturalism." One must remember that Raspail, like Gobineau before him, lived in these 3rd-world hell-holes. "Welcome our brothers from the Ganges!" cry the French P-C "Mongrolians," as a tiny group of Defenders of the West prepare to make a stand like the Spartans at Thermopylae. If you DON'T think it a warning, take a tour of CA, AZ, or TX, where "La Reconquista" is running full steam, as the lemmings pour through the joke of a border.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A vision of the end of the West (spoilers), 29 April 2012
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This review is from: The Camp of the Saints (Paperback)
First, I have to say that this would probably be easier to read in the original French rather than the translation; it's a bit disjointed in parts. This book condenses into about 7 weeks the destruction of the entire Western civilisation and its people and as such is a metaphor for what is taking much longer but which seems to be as inevitable. As a "Westerner", I had to put the book down for a while about halfway through because the sense of impending doom really got to me - the dread of what we know was going to happen. And it did. There was a bit of tearful humour at the end - although it would depend on your political bent whether you found it worthy of tears. I did. The whole book is worthy of tears: the West, having been industrious, inventive and latterly trying really hard to bend over backwards to deem every society equally worthy finds itself overrun by barbarians with no concept of self-sufficiency, birth control or even self control. It begs the question: why are Middle Eastern and African nations so backward?

It is heartbreaking: it showcases the LibLefty view that every country in the world has the right to exist except the Western countries; it showcases Political Correctness three decades before it became reality. It shows how the West became so spineless that it could not/would not protect itself against invasion: liberally inculcated soldiers refuse to fight... even the last bastion in Europe (the Swiss, who are armed - a privilege denied the rest of us) fall in the end.

A good book. Extremely depressing though.
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41 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most Important Literary Work This Century, 1 Aug 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Camp of the Saints (Paperback)
In simple prose and shockingly honest frank descriptions of his characters, Jean Raspail travels in the company of writers as great as Dostoyevsky and Chekov concerning a subject matter so sensitive it is forbidden to even discuss in public today. I feel the book makes an eloquent case for a conclusion so obvious that few of us can afford to ignore it like the Emperor's Clothes for much longer : given differentials in birth rates and immigration, the complete elimination of whites as a race is inevitable within a single century from now. Reading the book will make you understand why white people are treated as different by all the other races of the world and why they are considered as too dangerous to be permitted to develop the same racial cohesion and consciousness that is taken for granted by everyone else. Forget about political correctness ... this book will curl your toes inside of the first three chapters with startling insights and you'll recognize a lot of the personalities caricatured in the book in both the mainstream media and in the entertainment industries. At the turn of the century, white people were a mere 22% of the world population. Today, they are 8% and rapidly declining. For those interested in protecting endangered species, look no further than this astonishing literary classic, excellently translated from the original french by Norman Shapiro. If you read one book this year, make it "The Camp of the Saints."
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nostradamus 2.0, 7 Feb 2012
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This review is from: The Camp of the Saints (Paperback)
During the 2003 march against the Iraq war, many marches yelled "We Are All Hamas Now"! In the Camp of Saints, many marches yell "We Are All from the Ganges Now"! Now that is spooky. How did the author, Jean Raspail, know what people would be saying 30 years in to the future? There are many premonitions in The Camp of Saint. This is amazing and I can only think of two other books that can do this. This is why I rate this book with Orwell's and Huxley's. These guys predicted the future, not because of some weird magic powers or a membership in the illuminate, but if you have the gift of psychology, like Orwell and Huxley and the daddy of them all, Friedrich Nietzsche, did, then you too can see through the rubbish regurgitating out of the udders of the system, and see how things really are.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book, 21 July 2010
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This review is from: The Camp of the Saints (Paperback)
Brilliant book - a must read like 1984 or Animal Farm.
I also reccomend Muslim Mafia.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exceptional Book, 3 Aug 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: The Camp of the Saints (Paperback)
Though fictional, this book reflects the
desperation and fears present today. The fears
of those who seek a better life and the fears
of those that want to maintain their way of life.
This book presents one possible future of
the world. One in which many aspects are seen
in the daily news. Politically incorrect yes, but
reading worthwhile.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A horrifying tale of the Death of the West., 13 Jun 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: The Camp of the Saints (Paperback)
This novel deals with the issue of immigration from the Third World into the First World. Essentially, the author extrapolates from current immigration trends and simply has the next few decades of social "progress" occur in the course of a few months. That isn't realistic, of course, but you'll have a hard time noticing that fact as you read this extremely perceptive and insightful novel of apocalyptic doom. This is one of those politically incorrect novels that the American political & media establishments would just as soon you not read. Defy them! When the freighter "Golden Venture" grounded at New York City with hundreds of smuggled illegal aliens from China, those people who proposed enforcing the law and deporting these lawbreakers were ridiculed as having "a Camp-of-the-Saints mentality."
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An unparalleled grasp of race politics and the liberal mindset, 8 May 2010
By 
Passerby (Plymouth, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Camp of the Saints (Paperback)
Condensing the slow-boil reality of Western population replacement into one event, Raspail crystallises the hard-truth of the end-game of Western civilisation's current predicament. What a well-written book too! Great characters, a myriad of sub-plots, incredibly astute observations and a few exaggerations to drive the point home keep the reader mesmerised from start to finish. Whilst Raspail's characters are fictional they really are archetypes for those we've come to love or hate in real-life. From the naivety and poverty of 'universal brotherly love' to the motivations of the poverty-stricken masses, Camp of the Saints hammers in one nail after another. And, from Live Aid to New Labour, Raspail must have felt like Nostradamus!

A must read.
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30 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book that cannot be ignored, 10 Feb 2004
By 
Kurt A. Johnson (Marseilles, IL USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Camp of the Saints (Paperback)
During my long-ago youth, I remember people discussing a coming war of the Haves against the Have-nots. Well, what if the Have-nots launched their invasion armed not with pathetically out-of-date weapons, but with empty, out-stretched hands? In this book, author Jean Raspail examines just such an eventuality.
When the termination of a Belgian project of adopting babies from Third World nations is announced, a wave of despair sweeps through the poorest of the poor in Calcutta, India. A crazed prophet announces that the West has forfeited its land, and leads a million of these impoverished people on a "last chance armada" towards France. The whole world holds its breath, as millions of others of the world's poor wait to see how the French (and as such the West) will react. But, sapped by a political-correctness that has preached self-hatred and self-sacrifice, can France fight a war against a group of poor, unarmed, emaciated souls, even if the cost is the loss of a thousand years of Western civilization?
In a word - No.
I first read about this book in the December 1994 issue of the Atlantic Monthly, and was quite glad when a copy recently fell into my hands. This book racks the political Left over the coals, up one side and down the other, while at the same time trampling Christianity and its gospel of self-sacrifice and brotherhood under foot. It is Jean Raspail's belief that the West has lost its will to power, and that with declining birthrates, the West is doomed to extinction; submerged beneath a wave of invaders. "Many a civilization, victim of the selfsame fate, sits tucked in our museums, under glass, nearly labeled."
If you are looking for an uplifting book of a hope-filling future, then you will have to look elsewhere. But in this world, where explosive population growth is coupled with drastically unbalanced wealth, this is a book that cannot be ignored. Mass population movement from the Third World to the First is a fact of today, and the West is beginning to realize the significance.
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The Camp of the Saints
The Camp of the Saints by Norman R. Shapiro (Paperback - Dec 1994)
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