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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Introduction to Chomsky, 6 Nov. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Chomsky Trilogy: "Secrets, Lies and Democracy", "Prosperous Few and the Restless Many", "What Uncle Sam Really Wants" (Real Story) (Paperback)
I read this trilogy a couple months ago. I had never read Chomsky for fear that he was too difficult. But these books are compilations of his lectures and interviews, where he is most accessible. These books brought up some things I had never heard about, particularly our anti-democratic interventions in South America for the sake of American corporations. (That and the Media. It too is easy to understand and presents a rough sketch of his ideas of media control. I recommend it to any fans of these books.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The book Uncle Sam doesn't want you to read!, 20 July 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Chomsky Trilogy: "Secrets, Lies and Democracy", "Prosperous Few and the Restless Many", "What Uncle Sam Really Wants" (Real Story) (Paperback)
If you ever asked yourself whether the world is exactly how it is portrayed in the media and by the Americans, then you MUST read this. It will open your eyes and you will never believe anything they tell you ever again. "What Uncle Sam Really Wants" is a master-piece, and in another world, Chomsky would have been a Nobel Prize winner...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Towards greater inequalities, 15 April 2007
By 
Luc REYNAERT (Beernem, Belgium) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Chomsky Trilogy: "Secrets, Lies and Democracy", "Prosperous Few and the Restless Many", "What Uncle Sam Really Wants" (Real Story) (Paperback)
This trilogy gives a fair view of N. Chomsky's clinical vision on the US and the world.

He rightly sees the US as a business-run society, where the political parties reflect the interests of big corporations. The main aim of those corporations is higher market share and profits, not job creation or a better life for workers. An important factor in business profitability is the Pentagon and its military budget.

The powerful, the owners of those corporations, don't want to be subjected to democracy. They want an obedient, passive population of consumers and political spectators. This policy is successfully implemented through control of the media (`the general population doesn't know what's happening, and it doesn't know that it doesn't know').

The aim of US foreign policy was not to impose a democracy or respect for human rights or to increase living standards (a cardinal factor for the control of demographic tendencies). On the contrary, the US consistently opposed democracy if the results couldn't be controlled. Through covert (intelligence agencies) or military intervention the US (tried to) crush independent and popular forces that might bring about meaningful democracy (for those in power, `a virus' that would infect other countries and regions). Chomsky mentions interventions in Laos, Vietnam, Indonesia, the Philippines, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Chili, Panama, Grenada, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Iraq, Iran, Yugoslavia, Greece and Italy.

In the US and worldwide, he sees considerable increases in inequality. In the US, real wages are declining since the 1960s and working conditions are worsening.

However, this book contains also some inaccuracies. N. Chomsky underestimated the democratic importance of internet and also its business impact (skilled information workers don't have to emigrate). He thought that biotechnology and genetic engineering would become the major investment focuses of the future, not military expenditures (today 50 % of the total US budget).

His analysis of the oil price hike in the 1970s is not correct (see W. Engdahl) and the main aim of speculative capital is quick gains (results are published every three months).

It is evident that in three small books one cannot fully evaluate international institutions or dismember philosophical problems. For criticism of GATT, IMF and World Bank I recommend the books of J. Stiglitz, and for a study of human nature and the roots of racism the works of R. Dawkins.

Ultimately, what can ordinary people do in order to influence the political process: first of all, vote (elections matter), also demonstrate (cause of the end of the Vietnam War) and divulge your opinion.

These books are written by a superbly free mind. We need Chomsky's voice. Highly recommended.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars concise and informative intro to the business of politics, 1 Jun. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Chomsky Trilogy: "Secrets, Lies and Democracy", "Prosperous Few and the Restless Many", "What Uncle Sam Really Wants" (Real Story) (Paperback)
Who knew you could learn a lot from a highly decorated MIT professor? If you need some info behind your cynicim of politics, this book is for you. Another plus, it never made oprah's book of the month club.
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