Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 50% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle  Learn more Countdown to Prime Day Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars16
4.1 out of 5 stars
Format: Paperback|Change
Price:£9.95+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 24 February 2008
For those bikers who lived through the sixties this is a book that will bring back many a memory. I was there as an impoverished apprentice and drooled over the bikes that are depicted within these pages. The author obviously shared the same dreams (and maybe realised them) as the book has been compiled with loving care. Those who came to the scene later will have a true slice of history in this book. Excellent.
0Comment|8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 7 October 2012
Being 'my' era (+the 70's), I could review this with an informed eye. I expected Mick's work to be almost perfect, and it was. Well researched with many good pictures, he puts across the sense and feeling of the times. The 60's were when motorcycling was on one of it's cyclical wanes. Despite the highest ever 2 wheel registrations of the 20th Century in 1959, and with masses of cheap motorcycles being around, the arrival of Sir Alec Issigonis's Mini and it's many copies, (Riley Elf, etc.,) really knocked the ground out of the Motorcycle world. Suddenly Dad could afford a decent car, so the old sidevalve single and Canterbury Carmobile sidecar were out. The better off bought little Johnny a 'nice little car' instead of "one of those dirty, smelly, dangerous motorbikes". (Similar to today, with the Chav and his beaten up hatchback).
So, those who rode motorcycles in the 60's were either too poor, or too anti-social to drive a car. Thus the rise of the 'Rocker'. These people, quite naturally, wanted the best. If the manufacturers wouldn't or couldn't make it, then construct it yourself. The Triton or Norvin being the top hybrids. A DBD34GS Gold Star, esp a Taylor Dow one, being the top production bike. Can't afford one? Buy a £30 B33 and call it an 'iron barelled Goldie'..... many did!
So, here was a world ripe for home grown realisations of teenage dreams. There were some awful concoctions, but, like Dave Degen's/Paul Dunstall's machines, many were mechanical works of art.
This book explains why and how, and is a must to any serious motorcyclist, (as are any of Mick's other books!). 10 out of 10!
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 29 January 2014
For us of a certain age this book is a nostalgic look back to the times when British motorcycles ruled the streets. There are some great photos in here and some lovely bikes. What I also particularly liked about this book is that it shows some of the people too making this an interesting book from the social history side aswell. The author is right too to mention that the riders were not the rebels they were portrayed to be in the media most of them were ordinary people like you and me, united in their love of bikes.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 July 2010
It`s a great collection of photographs from a time when most riders wouldn`t of thought of taking pictures of themselves and their friends-pre digital so cost too much to bother with.most of the machinery is immaculate, far different from the norm at the time.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 31 August 2009
Nostalgia is what we are into and this book really took me back.
The comradeship and generosity that was around in the 60's as bikers came together
All sorts of memories come flooding back as you read this book....so enjoy
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 26 August 2010
An interesting read, if a little short but the images used are not reproduced very well. This may be down to the originals not being very good or the reproduction is poor... not too bad for the price though!
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 18 January 2013
Really lovely photos of bikes, brought back memories of the 60s for me, which I bought as a gift for daughter's boyfriend who really likes his bikes. It was much appreciated by him.
0Comment|2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 July 2011
I found this book very weak on content from the era of the 'Ton-up Boys', 'Coffee Bar Cowboys' or 'Rocker'. There is a lot of rubbish printed whithin its covers ...for example; 'The Ace Cafe' is depicted as being in some town centre somewhere, which I have no doubt the one pictured is - the problem is it's not 'THE' Ace Cafe which is still to this day on the London North Circular Road. Also most of the bikes shown in the book we maybe would have dreamed of owning ...but couldn't afford on apprentice wages. Yes, I was a Coffee Bar Cowboy or Ton-up Boy all the way through the sixties and enjoyed every second of it ...but I sadly don't see much of it in this book - sorry.
0Comment|5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 5 January 2015
Takes me back to the good old days of being a rocker .Now i just sit in the kitchen by my jukebox and dream of the past I had a bad crash in 1983 so cannot ride anymore . Happy Days/
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 3 January 2014
Nice book ,some mistakes ,good pictures ,can get a sense of what rockers were trying to do with there bikes
0Comment|One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)