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38
4.8 out of 5 stars
Mossflower (Redwall)
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on 16 September 1999
The thief and the warrior, what a combination! A must read for any hidden warrior spirits.
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on 4 December 1998
Mask shouldn't have died. Now two words, READ MOSSFLOWER
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Despite being two years younger, Mossflower shows it's age much more than Redwall does. Why is that? I'm not sure myself, but whereas Redwall gleams gold with it's age, Mossflower sports a glimmer of rust to it's edges.
It might be because Mossflower isn't the first in the Redwall series, and if you've read Redwall, it treads very familiar ground, to the point where you could substitute characters and scenes from one book and fit them snugly into the other, needing nothing more than a few name changes.

Plus, whereas I hated Cluny in Redwall, Tsarmina is probably the best character in Mossflower. The good guys, such as Skipper, Lady Amber, Bella and the four travellers (Martin, Gonff, Dinny and Log-a-Log) come off as supremely arrogant, self-satsified and downright mean at times, and I actually felt sorry for Tsarmina and her Kotir crew most of the time. Nothing ever goes right for them, which makes victory for the 'good' guys ultimately hollow. Tsarmina's anarchic, charismatic wild attitude brought the pages to life whenever she strutted across them, and evil or not, I rooted for her. Is this a fault of Mr. Jacques' storytelling, or a strength? I don't know, but it did mean that, unlike Redwall where the ending satisfied me, Mossflower left me feeling rather hollow.
It throws a lot at you: there are so many characters, most of which aren't important (the revolving door of Captains at Kotir is plain ridiculous), a whirlwind of viewpoint-switching throughout every chapter, and many varied locations. The result is certainly epic and impressive, but it failed to grab me as well as Redwall's tight locales did.
That said, there is loads of fun to be had from the madcap chaos, if you're willing to go with the flow, and it expands the lore and legend of Redwall briiliantly. It is also laugh-out-loud funny in plenty of places. All in all, despite all I've said, Mossflower is probably the better book of the two when compared side by side. If you've read neither, you may find this to be a better start. It just doesn't help that this doesn't bring much new to the table, and sports good guys who are less likeable than the bad guys.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 8 December 2006
This essentially tells the first tale of the renowned Martin the Warrior as he helps the 'woodlanders' of Mossflower rise up against the evil Tsarmina and her minions in the fortress of Kotir. To do this Martin must venture to Salamandastron to return Boar the fighter to help with their uprising. Meanwhile the woodlandes employ a spy, and a master of disguise in order to break out their prisoners, while the stoats etc launch reprisal attacks etc.

If you have ever read a Brian Jaques book before, this is exactly the same, and I mean EXACTLY. Every book seems to have the band of evil creatures holed up, trying to rule the innocent hedgehogs, squirrels etc. There are a few skirmishes, a quest, numerous plans and strategies on both sides, and a thoroughly nasty evildoer.

If you have read one, you have read them all. I have also read 'Martin the Warrior' and 'Marlfox' which stick to exactly the same pattern. The bad guys make stupid plans, those on the side of good are annoying, and in order to enforce some element of characterisation all he has done is make each race have a peculiarity with their speech (e.g the bats repeat the last few words that they speak).

Perhaps children may like this, and I would certainly encourage them to read rather than waste their lives in front of television, but there are so many better books out there than this. I would certainly not recommend reading more than one of this series, unless you want to read a virtually identical book with different named characters.
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on 6 February 2015
Really exciting and interesting
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 December 2000
I have just read Mossflower by Brian Jacques and I think it is an amazing book. It is the second book in the Redwall series, which is about animals fighting. All the books in the series have the same idea behind them - a castle or fort with a bad animal with troops inside and a good animal with heroic friends outside which try to overcome the evil creature inside. At first, I thought that a book with animals fighting would be babyish but I was proved wrong, as the book is full of battles, military strategies and struggles between good and evil. The main character in Mossflower is a young mouse called Martin who is a brave warrior. He loses the sword blade in a bloody battle and carries the hilt of the sword around his neck as a talisman. Later in the book a new sword is made for him in the Fire Mountain, Salamandastron. With this new weapon he goes on to kill Tsarmina in a one-on-one fight...The book is a gripping read and I recommend it to an 8-16 year old who likes a lot of action.
Anna Comboni Age 8
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on 22 September 2014
Excellent service and book
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on 11 June 2015
A very good read.
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