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43 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb for any age !
Wonderful for anybody that wants to know the answers to life's sometimes baffling questions (especially if you have children that want the answers to questions that sometimes you even have doubts about). This book is almost certainly for you (look really clever in front of the childern, no more ask the teacher the answer to that one). Boys will love the question on...
Published on 23 Feb 2007 by Alessi Lover

versus
29 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars enjoyable
I enjoyed both books equally; the questions were simple enough the answers even simpler in some instances. Now I know why the penguin's feet don't stick and who or not eats wasps, couldn't get through the day without the answers. Enjoyable read
Published on 6 Nov 2006 by S. Wallace


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91 of 106 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars So so., 28 Nov 2006
By 
M. G. Chisholm "chiefengineer3" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions (Paperback)
Now here is a thing. This book actually doesn't tell you the answers in many cases to the questions posed. In fact the questions are generally much better than the answers. The problem is that the questions are not dealt with by the authors or experts in the field of the particular question. They are answered by Joe Public who reads the New Scientist, which is all well and good if the person is Prof of that discipline relevant to the poser, but this is not normally the case. Also the questions are often answered by more than one person and often with differing results. My feeling is that whilst clearly some people are worth listening to, the fact that any old Tom, Dick or Harry with a plausible and possibly right or wrong answer means that you just can't actually feel that you know the correct answer. Sort of defeats the role of the book to be honest.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No, it's not because they wear a tuxedo, 23 Nov 2007
By 
Bellhop Bob (Gloucestershire and environs) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions (Paperback)
I wasn't sure about this book, but then I bought DO ANTS HAVE ARSEHOLES? And laughed myself silly. This book is on the same scale.

The book contains questions we've all wondered about, but were afraid to ask. And here they are. With the answers. The great thing about WHY DON'T PENGUINS' FEET FREEZE is that it can be read by adults and children. PG rating. The ideas range from history to physics, to chemistry and strophysics, so you won't be bored, but neither will you be overwhelmed. For other great books, I'd reommend DON'T STOP ME NOW and the book DRESS YOUR FAMILY IN CORDUORY by David Sedaris.
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60 of 70 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Great Read, 5 Dec 2006
This review is from: Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions (Paperback)
Someone got me "Does Anything Eat Wasps?" last year for Christmas, so I picked up a copy of Penguins to return the favour. Thinking I'd just flick through the book and see if it was as good was a bad idea, as I ended up reading the whole thing just to find out the answers to all of life's little mysteries. Great fun to read, just pick it up and dive in. Looks like I'll have to get another copy now as this one is staying with me over christmas...
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Quite dissapointing, 19 Sep 2007
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This review is from: Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions (Paperback)
I've been a big fan of New Scientist for a number of years, and was so excited to see this book, and "Does anything eat wasps?". I decided to buy this one over the first one, for a reason unbeknown to me, and I was quite dissapointed with the content and replies to the questions.

I was expecting set-in-stone scientific reasons for each question, and much of the time it is simply a persons opinion, and there may even be 3 or 4 answers to the same question each saying something different, which then makes me beg the question..What's the point? I'm still non the wiser!

I thought this book would appeal to me much more than it actually does, it seemed like a book full of answers to questions I reguarly annoy friends and family with, but many of the questions seem like they were asked for the sake of asking, and that New Scientist were clutching at straws to get enough content to fill the book.

There are some interesting facts which can be taken, but nothing which can't be found on the internet.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ever Wondered...?, 20 Oct 2009
This review is from: Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions (Paperback)
The 'New Scientist' is a weekly magazine, first published in 1956, that covers the recent happenings in the scientific world. In 1994, the magazine launched a new column called "The Last Word" in which its driven by its readers - not all of whom are geeks in white coats. Here, they could not only pose a science-related question, but also provide the answers. In 2005, a selection of the questions asked and answered were gathered together for "Does Anything Eat Wasps ?" - a book that elbowed its way to the upper ends of the UK's bestseller's list. Unsurprisingly, with a great deal of material still available, New Scientist decided to follow it up with "Why Don't Penguin's Feet Freeze ?".

The book is divided into chapters, depending on the focus of the questions selected - our bodies, plants and animals, and weird weather for example. While the book is informative, it is equally as likely to raise a smile - the overall tone is not that of a difficult, highbrow scientific paper. Some of the questions that are dealt with include : "Why do birds never fall off their perches when sleeping ?", "Fish don't fart, why is this ?", "Why doesn't superglue stick to the inside of the tube ?", "What time is it at the North Pole ?" and - from a nine year old boy - "Is it a coincidence that a human finger fits exactly into a human nostril ?"

An enjoyable and informative book - it's one I tend to dip into once in a while, rather than reading it from cover to cover.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!, 20 Dec 2007
By 
R. Campbell (UK) - See all my reviews
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Preceding reviewer clearly has no imagination: this book is lovely.
There are range of questions: Some are those where you feel you ought to know the answer but don't (such as "why only fingers and toes wrinkle in the bath" or "why mirrors invert left/right but not up/down"), others are things you've noticed but never thought about: "Why does the escalator hand-rail often travel at a different speed to the stairs?"

The answers are universally clear and well written. They are interesting for a wide audience and not patronizing. It's definitely an easy read and fun to pick up and leaf through at random.

Highly recommended!
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25 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Really Funny Read, 22 Nov 2006
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions (Paperback)
Well over a hundred questions that you have always wanted to know the answers to. If you can remember the answers to all of these questions, you could end up being a genius and one of Mensa's all time greats. Alternatively it could send you over the edge and they'll end up sending for the men in white coats. Not for you, but the people you keep telling the answers to.

Joking apart this is a compilation of questions that no one has ever thought ask, and if they did want to ask, where on earth would they find the answers to such bizarre questions. If the questions are bizarre, some of the answers are even more so. Some scientific, some funny and some so simple you wonder why you did not think of it yourself.

A good book to relax with on Boxing Day when all the relatives have gone home and you can get some peace and quiet. That would be a good question: "How do I get some peace and quiet?" Even this book hasn't got the answer to that one.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Quirky but fun, 12 Dec 2006
By 
Wendy Jones "wjones7423" (Dundee, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions (Paperback)
As I say in the title, this is a quirky little book, but fun never-the-less. I like the way it is set out with several people giving replies on the topic. Despite the fact I am not a scientist, I found it easy to read and full of interest. It is the sort of book you could give to most people as a present, and could pull out at family christmas parties. There is enough interest there for anyone. I liked this book, not just because I am a penguin fan, you will have to read it to find out "why" penguins feet don't freeze. Buy it and enjoy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Don't fire your gun into the air..., 13 Feb 2013
By 
Eileen Shaw "Kokoschka's_cat" (Leeds, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions (Paperback)
The Great Wall of China commonly thought to be the only non-natural object visible from space, but the claim is incorrect. It's an urban legend comparable to the one about mass suicide by lemmings. Some of these questions, all sent in by ordinary people interested in science and sometimes other matters, which I will come to, and answered by other ordinary people with an insight in their field. I have often wondered why the sky is blue, and the answer is set out by Rick Eraho of Cleckheaton. Apparently it's all down to something called Rayleigh scattering. Blue light, which has a high frequency is scattered ten times more than red light and this same process also explains the red colours we see when the sun is low on the horizon. All light has to travel huge distances to reach us and during the trip the blue light is scattered away, but red light, which is less susceptible to scattering can continue on a direct path to our eyes.

This book also answered another question I'd often wondered about. Why is it that excited soldiers in Iraq and other war sites shoot their guns up into the air without being injured when the bullets return to earth. The answer is, they don't always escape their foolish actions at all and the practice causes injuries with disproportionate fatalities.

On a more prosaic note, what should one do when out shopping with someone else in a large supermarket and they've disappeared on a forage of their own? Is it best to stay still and hope they'll find you, or go on your own search for them? The best strategy may be to wait at the exit of the store on the grounds that the other person may eventually conclude you've gone home and do likewise. The maximum waiting time could extend to be from the time you lost each other until the store closes. A strategy of staying still only works if just one person stays still, then the waiting time is either infinite, if you get locked in, or again, until the store closes. The waiting time, in my experience, is lessened if you have some idea of which aisles will most attract your companion. Easier, I tend to feel, with teenagers, who will gravitate to films, fizzy drinks, or clothes. First, use your intuition.

This is an entertaining and enlightening little book, well worth a look through.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars unscientific, but ok, 2 Jan 2011
Some of the questions and answers are quite interesting. However, with a lot of the answers it is obvious that that it is their own opinion, that they have just made assumptions about life. This is very unscientific. It could have been made more interesting, and possibly more entertaining if the people at new scientist tested the theories sent into them, even the silly ones.

It's interesting, and a bit fun, but you won't gain anything from reading this, just others opinions.
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Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions
Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze?: And 114 Other Questions by New Scientist (Paperback - 5 Oct 2006)
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