Customer Reviews


12 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The things they CAN'T teach you at Harvard Business School
Mark McCormack is Founder, Chairman and CEO of sports marketing company International Management Group (IMG). He was named 'the most powerful man in sports' by Sports Illustrated.
In this book McCormack does not so much criticize Harvard Business School as the title suggests, but complements the traditional business school-education with 'street smarts' - "the...
Published on 3 Nov 2002 by Gerard Kroese

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Revisit
Having read this some years ago I wished to update; it is a useful reminder that sales is a human led process and computer led marketing leaves a lot out. A little dated and a little smug, as a successful entrepreneur who had studied belatedly at harvard on being asked what he had learnt there replied: "Nothing, excpet that I would have not known that if I had been...
Published on 8 Feb 2012 by MacGregor


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The things they CAN'T teach you at Harvard Business School, 3 Nov 2002
By 
Gerard Kroese (The Netherlands) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: What They Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School (Paperback)
Mark McCormack is Founder, Chairman and CEO of sports marketing company International Management Group (IMG). He was named 'the most powerful man in sports' by Sports Illustrated.
In this book McCormack does not so much criticize Harvard Business School as the title suggests, but complements the traditional business school-education with 'street smarts' - "the ability to make active, positive use of your instincts, insights, and perceptions." (Funnily enough, McCormack did not even attend the HBS, he has a law degree from Yale.) "My main purpose in writing this book is to fill in many of the gaps - the gaps between a business school education and the street knowledge that comes from day-to-day experience of running a business and managing people." He splits the 'street smarts' and this book up into three parts: People, sales and negotiation, and running a business. With each part consisting of 4-to-6 chapters.
In the first part McCormack discusses matters related to people, such as reading people, creating impressions, preparation for business situations, and improving your career. "Business situations always come down to people situations. And the more - and the sooner - I know about the person I am dealing with, the more effective I'm going to be." In the second part of the book - Sales and Negotiation - the author dicusses sales, negotiations and marketing. Sales and negotiations are probably the strongest point of both the book and McCormack, he really excels here. ...The third part of the book - Running a Business - is probably the weakest part of the book. Although there are some great one-liners, it is clear that the author is not that much at ease with writing about organization structures, policies and procedures. In fact, it looks like he despises most of these subjects. However, in the final chapter he provides some good advice for entrepreneurs and people thinking about starting their own business.
Yes, I do like this book. It is somewhat unconventional and is not really a business/management book. The examples from his experiences in sports marketing are exceptional and extremely useful, although the author comes across somewhat arrogant. And yes, it is a great complement to the traditional business school-education (although they are now covering some of the subjects McCormack discusses). It is very simple to read and relatively short (250 pages). Recommended to managers and, yes also, MBA-students.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars IF you buy no other book on sales this is the one to get., 4 Aug 2006
This review is from: What They Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School (Paperback)
I bought this book when it 1st came out, and here we are 11 years later, I'm a little older and hopefully a little wiser, my sales career has flourished in the interim, and a large part of that success is due to the principles and values laid out in this book.

Most of us know what the right things are to do in life, and some times we do them, because they feel right to us, and what the training and knowledge givers do ( like Mark McCormack ) is endorse that we are doing the right things " right '

A lot of this book is common sense, and it teaches you a lot, about how to bring the best out of the people you will work with, customers, suppliers, colleagues etc.

Don't let the fact that the last review of this book was in 2002, or the fact that it has been around a while, my library contains over 200 books on the discipline of selling, marketing and human behaviour.

What prompted me to write this review, is I'm now working with a lot of young men and woman who are entering the profession of sales, for the 1st time, and when they ask me for advice and guidance, based on my 20+years experience, I tell them if you only ever invest in one book, this is the one to buy, it encompasses, all the lessons I have learnt 1st hand on my journey in my chosen profession of sales.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book full of something you can't be coached in -experience, 21 Mar 1999
By A Customer
An easy-to-read book by a very successful man. At first it appaears that Mr McCormack could be on a bit of an ego trip when you see the amount of name-dropping. However, when you realise that he is simply talking about about real situations involving real people, then the contextof the book becomes more apparent. A must for the owner-manager of any SME or anyone embarking on a career in management. This book talks about the more practical issues of running a successful business which are, unfortunately, still a mystery to many people who are struggling at 'the sharp end'. Well worth reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A little too detailed, 17 Jan 2009
By 
Martin Schröder (Stockholm, Sweden) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
According to this book, what they don't teach you at Harward Business School is common sense. Common sense is not easily teachable so this book attempts to fulfill that void by presenting many short examples on how the author usually handles different situations. How do you say no? How do you effectively schedule a bunch of calls? What's the importance of timing in a conversation?

I personally felt that some of the advice was way too specific to be applied outside of Mr. McCormack's own life. His style of writing involves focusing on details more than describing things abstractly. He almost goes as far as specifying the exact number of seconds that you should dedicate to taking a deep breath before making an important call.

At the same time, even though he writes with great detail, often he seems to rely a lot on implicit meaning, avoiding the details that are actually necessary. The result is that sometimes it's not clear enough weather he says that you should do something or advises you not to do it. It all depends on how you interpreted his wit.

I would recommend reading "Thick Face Black Heart" by Chin-Ning Chu to anyone who finds this book interesting. Chin-Ning Chu gives a lot of similar advice but in a much more abstract and universal form.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very insightful..., 17 May 2012
I love this book. Using your gut feelings and many more insights...
Do not expect an a, b, c type of lecture. He tells his business stories to get the point across.
Life would be too simple if everything was written in text books or if it was just 2x2=4. We also have to integrate our insight in all areas of life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Book from the Original Ari Gold, 1 April 2013
This review is from: What They Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School (Paperback)
Mark McCormack was the lawyer and sports agent who founded IMG in 1960, signing Arnold Palmer as his first client. He and his firm revolutionised sports management, broadening the approach of athlete management beyond appearance fees and sponsorships into media, and true partnerships and areas like course design.

In addition to being pretty lucrative for his athletes, McCormack did OK himself, making it into the Forbes 400.

He wrote about a dozen books too, the most famous of which is "What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School".

It's an outstandingly, insightful book with sections on People (how to read them, how to listen aggressively, the positives of ego), Taking the Edge in business, Sales & Negotiation, Running a Business, and being an Entrepreneur.

The Entrepreneur piece has some sharp observations in it about taking on partners, minority equity and what makes success.

The quotes that stuck with me:
"Smart people judge you by three criteria - and even if they don't, in time, it will determine how they think of you:
1. Commitment
2. Attention to detail
3. Immediate follow-up"

"What you can learn from working in the mailroom: you won't learn humility, you won't learn respect, and you won't learn the company inside out or bottom up. What you will learn is something very important, and perhaps frightening about yourself.
The people who get ahead have a need, are driven to perform a task well, no matter what the task or how mundane it may actually be. They bring to any job an attitude which actually transforms the job into something greater."

"Business is a competition, and any high-level, sophisticated competition is almost exclusively a head game. I have observed three attitudinal characteristics which are common to every champion I've known. The first is the champion's profound sense of dissatisfaction with his own accomplishments. Any goal that is attained immediately becomes just a step to a greater, more unreachable goal.
The second is an ability to peak their performances, to get themselves up for major situations, tournaments and events. No one can operate consistently as his or her highest level, but the legends always seem to perform when the stakes are greatest, and it's why the major tournaments have always been dominated by a limited number of
participants.
Finally it is their killer instinct - their ability to put their opponents away. In the champion's mind, he is never ahead;he never believes he is performing as well as he actually is."

Terrific book, very easy read... it gets the competitive fires burning. No Kindle version, paperback only:
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Revisit, 8 Feb 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having read this some years ago I wished to update; it is a useful reminder that sales is a human led process and computer led marketing leaves a lot out. A little dated and a little smug, as a successful entrepreneur who had studied belatedly at harvard on being asked what he had learnt there replied: "Nothing, excpet that I would have not known that if I had been there".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars THIS LITTLE BOOK WILL TEACH YOU MORE THAN ANY BUSINESS COLLEGE, 16 Nov 2009
This review is from: What They Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School (Paperback)
I FIRST READ THIS BOOK TWENTY YEARS AGO - BEFORE I WENT TO UNIVERSITY. IT DOES EXACTLY WHAT THE TITLE SAYS. IT GIVES CLEAR AND PRACTICAL ADVICE ON RUNNING ANY ENTERPRISE. FAR MORE THAN YOU WILL LEARN IN SCHOOL.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Unfortunately, the title is better than the contents., 24 Nov 2009
This review is from: What They Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School (Paperback)
I can't help feeling that whilst the book's title over-promises, the book itself under-delivers. It doesn't really give you the cutting edge insights and secrets that you might expect from the cover. Plenty of good advice, yes, but a bit random and all over the place for my liking. I rather wonder whether, in the many years since this book was written, they are now teaching a lot of this at Harvard anyway. Perhaps that's because this book is starting to show its age now - it feels a bit like the memoirs of a smart guy who did well in an age when business people just weren't particularly professional. A lot of the content is far less surprising nowadays than it was when it was authored. That said, I would still recommend it as one of those books that you should read if you're in business. It's a classic. And you'll enjoy it far more if you treat it as precisely that.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars or at Law School, 14 Oct 2013
This review is from: What They Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School (Paperback)
There are literally tens of thousands of self-help books available for purchase on Amazon; successful people have never read them. Most are rather longer and more expensive versions of reading your Stars in the daily paper, where you should relax or perhaps try to please those higher-up than oneself. The advice in those books - very hand-me-down stuff - is, after the buzz it generates, forgotten within minutes.

I read this book longer ago than I would care to remember and is the closest I have come to reading a self-help book. I was starting a small business myself and was looking for tips; I carefully read a page a day. The only parts I can recall, as is always the case with memory, are those pieces of advice which are seriously mistaken or ill-advised. The rest was unexceptionable and doubtless wise, but all the reading in the world will not make you an entrepeneur any more than it will make you a great athlete or a great lover. Despite the author's advice my project failed (within a few years); the author has now sadly left his corporate cubicle.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

What They Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School
What They Don't Teach You At Harvard Business School by Mark McCormack (Paperback - 13 Jun 1994)
£7.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews