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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars interesting Book which considers British War Films And Their production
This book considers the production of war films,including features and shorts during World War 2.The author gives us an insight as to the propaganda apparatus and a view on how well or badly it functioned.The book stictks strictly to its aim to cover only war films and does it in an informative and interesting manner.Only in the conclusion at the end does it lapse in to...
Published on 16 Sept. 2011 by Wingate

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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing analyses, full of commonplace views
There is ultimately a disappointing work with a very conventional viewpoint. There is surely much more to be said about British cinema of WW2 than this. Surely comedy played an important role in British films during the war: Let George Do It and such films were as important as Henry V. Much better to find a copy Raymond Durgnat's inspired A Mirror for England in a...
Published on 24 April 2001


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars interesting Book which considers British War Films And Their production, 16 Sept. 2011
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This review is from: The British at War: Cinema, State and Propaganda, 1939-45 (Cinema and Society) (Paperback)
This book considers the production of war films,including features and shorts during World War 2.The author gives us an insight as to the propaganda apparatus and a view on how well or badly it functioned.The book stictks strictly to its aim to cover only war films and does it in an informative and interesting manner.Only in the conclusion at the end does it lapse in to that dreadful acadamese beloved of those who dwell in higher learning.
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing analyses, full of commonplace views, 24 April 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The British at War: Cinema, State and Propaganda, 1939-45 (Cinema and Society) (Paperback)
There is ultimately a disappointing work with a very conventional viewpoint. There is surely much more to be said about British cinema of WW2 than this. Surely comedy played an important role in British films during the war: Let George Do It and such films were as important as Henry V. Much better to find a copy Raymond Durgnat's inspired A Mirror for England in a second-hand bookstore. Three stars top.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent debate of cinema, propaganda and war, 20 Nov. 2000
By A Customer
James Chapman manages to balance the role of cinema and propaganda in the overall context of the Second World War and the home front.
The debate between the feature film and documentary film provide an excellent backdrop to discussion and analysis of the films produced in that era.
A fascinating insight to how cinema and propaganda developed as the Second World War progressed. A very comprehensive piece of work.
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The British at War: Cinema, State and Propaganda, 1939-45 (Cinema and Society)
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