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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 25 December 2000
A great story evolving in a believable future world. You really feel for the characters he creates. It is the best SF book I have read. Its perfect. At times, especially in the first half of the book, it does demand a lot af reader. However, once you realize what he has so wonderfully created, you would want it no other way. Some have mentioned Iain M. banks books resemble this one. I really wish they did come even close, but they do not :(. This book is 2 stars better than anything he has produced. I seriously doubt the next book he is currently writing (chasm city due summer 2001, I think) can possibly surpass this one. I will buy it the minute it is published to find out.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 19 September 2007
Revelation Space was recommended to me by a colleague who watches the same types of TV reads some similar books etc and I enjoyed it. The interlinked stories had enough complexity to keep me interested and the ideas are grounded enough to make sense taking human nature into account. It isn't a great work of literature, but the writing is good enough to allow the story to flow and I like kick ass women so having Khouri and Volyova centre stage who can both think and fire a big gun worked for me.

Good enough for me to have ordered the other parts of the trilogy, and Chasm City as follow up reads.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 27 August 2010
Loved the imagery, terminology, variety of multiple human factions and general feel of decay in the revelation space universe. The first half of the book introducing the characters is definitely stronger, but as they all travel faster than light the notion of the dates on chapters is both irrelevant and initially confusing. Once all the disparate character story threads start to tie up though it slows down and loses direction leading up to an ending that was ultimately a bit disappointing. Definitely not a book to start with if you're new to SF.
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on 25 June 2015
very happy thanks
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 23 February 2004
'Revelation Space' by Alistair Reynolds, is a superb sci-fi story, full of well thought of characters and an interesting plot that demands you keep those pages turning.
Set in the mid twenty-sixth century, it begins on the planet Resurgam, where Dan Sylveste, a scientist and archeologist, is studing what wiped out the Amaritan, a alien bird race which lived on Resurgam until something called The Event made them extinct. However, a rebellion happens on the colony, and Sylveste is arrested.
The book then jumps to the 'Nostalgia Of Infinity', a lighthugger, (gigantic ship), piloted by a crew of Ultras, (humans who have become cybernetic lifeforms), a their Captain, who has caught a highly contagious plague which is slowly assimilating him and the ship for its own purposes. The main character here is Voyvola who is trying to hind the murder of the gunner officer, a man who had gone insane.
Next, Khori is introduced, an ex-soldier turned assasin, during one assignment she meets the Madamoselle, a powerful woman who hires Khori promising to reunite her with her husband.
Her assignment; get aboard the lighthugger 'Nostaligia Of Infinity', get to Resurgam, kill Sylveste.
Meanwhile, Sylveste has vistited Lacille, the only man to have gone to an alien space construction know as a Shroud and survived, and has learned ancient secrets.
Each of these plot threads will lead the characters to meet each other, and learn the truth of what happened to the Amaratin, before it happens to them.
The story is superb. Then why not 5/5? Well, several paragraphs which drag on become serveral chapters, especially when they reach Cerberus. The creature known as 'Sun Stealer' is built up well, but when he does make an appearence, he is dissapointing.
The ending was sudden and abrupt, and looks like that was Reynold's biggest problem, after I'd finished reading it, I was left thinking 'What just happened?' It's like someone has taken the ending from 'Doom: Endgame' and tried to make it better.
Even though, can't wait to get me hands on the sequel!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 8 July 2012
This book simply blew me away (metaphorically). More accessible than the ramblings of Banks, more concise than Peter F Hamilton, yet no less amazing in scope, technology, plausibility and sheer story telling skill. LOved the characters, connected with the 'goodies', disliked the 'baddies' and ultimately cared about what was happening to them all in the story. Brilliant, brilliant, brilliant. Will be reading much more of his work.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 18 March 2003
I've been a big fan of Iain M Banks for years and having read all his books was looking to find something to tide me over till the next one. AND BOY WHAT A TIDE!!!!
Revelation Space had me hooked from the first page and left me gagging for more at the last.
My biggest problem with the book is that I got so immersed in Alistair's amazingly crafted worlds that reality seems somewhat of a let down.
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11 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on 18 June 2007
Perhaps I'd been spoiled by reading China Mieville and Iain M Banks before this, but I found the dialogue and character development to be very poor, the plot chronology confusingly explained (especially initially) and the general atmosphere and scene descriptions to be dull and uninspired. After a few hundred pages I was still waiting to be grabbed by the story but persevered, in fact it was probably a good 2/3 of the way through before I actually started to care about any of the characters, and then only in the most passing sense and it was only really a curiosity of where all this meandering was going that kept me reading. It's not that it's a bad tale and there are some nice ideas in there, but it's really poorly written and lacking in any warmth. Overall, pretty disappointing. I picked this up on the cheap along with the more recent 'Century Rain' - I'll give that a bash to see if the author has improved over time, but my hopes are not high.
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22 of 39 people found the following review helpful
on 10 July 2001
Why this book has created such fuss is totally beyond me. I have seldom been so disappointed by what purports to be high-concept space opera, when it is in fact pure pulp. Not very good pulp at that.....
While the overall plot was of enough interest to keep me reading, the book is peppered with cardboard cutout characters, with unbelievable motivations, stumbling slap-dash from one derivative set-piece to the next. While the author has clearly been "inspired" by various sources (e.g. frozen captain - Dark Star, planet-sized computers - Hitch-Hiker's, even a throw-away chest-bursting scene straight out of Alien), what is particularly irksome is that so much is uncannily like Iain M. Banks' work, even down to quirky names for the ships.
However, the true let down of the book is that the author often resorts to deus ex machina solutions or scenarios to keep the story moving. Eg to give two of the characters a chance to escape, they are conveniently out of the weapons range of the ship they have just escaped - the same ship that a couple of chapters before had nearly attacked a planet from outside it's star system! Coupled with heavy, implausible dialogues and passages in which the "revelations" are contained, this really does fall down on maintaining the consistent "suspension of disbelief" that is essential to good SF.
Do yourself a favour - go re-read a Banks instead.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 29 July 2009
Alastair counts as a new author to me, having cut down on my reading in the last 10 years. Some good ideas but overall I found it a little slow paced at times. A 3* from me means I found it readable and based on this will read other Reynolds if nothing from one of my preferred authors (e.g. Ian M Banks) is around.
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