Customer Reviews

50
4.7 out of 5 stars
The Collected Stories Of Arthur C. Clarke (GOLLANCZ S.F.)
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£16.54+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on 27 February 2012
I've recently gotten into SciFi and picked this up along with a few other kindle books.
This contains over 100 stories and while I've only made it about 50% through I have been astounded by the foresight of a writer whose stories seem timeless. I haven't found any the felt particularly dated and some seem able to predict the future.

I am an avid reader and the best thing about this collection is that there are so many great stories collected together, it's kept me busy for weeks and I normally finish books in a day.

The Collected Stories of Arthur C. Clarke

"Travel by Wire!"
"How We Went to Mars"
"Retreat from Earth"
"Reverie"
"The Awakening"
"Whacky"
"Loophole"
"Rescue Party"
"Technical Error"
"Castaway"
"The Fires Within"
"Inheritance"
"Nightfall"
"History Lesson"
"Transience"
"The Wall of Darkness"
"The Lion of Comarre"
"The Forgotten Enemy"
"Hide-and-Seek"
"Breaking Strain"
"Nemesis"
"Guardian Angel"
"Time's Arrow"
"A Walk in the Dark"
"Silence Please"
"Trouble with the Natives"
"The Road to the Sea"
"The Sentinel"
"Holiday On the Moon"
"Earthlight"
"Second Dawn"
"Superiority"
"If I Forget Thee, Oh Earth"
"All The Time in the World"
"The Nine Billion Names of God" referenced in "godfellas"- futurama

I'm this far in,

"The Possessed"
"The Parasite"
"Jupiter Five"
"Encounter in the Dawn"
"The Other Tiger"
"Publicity Campaign"
"Armaments Race"
"The Deep Range"
"No Morning After"
"Big Game Hunt"
"Patent Pending"
"Refugee"
"The Star"
"What Goes Up"
"Venture to the Moon" (six individual connected stories)
"The Starting Line"
"Robin Hood, F.R.S."
"Green Fingers"
"All that Glitters"
"Watch this Space"
"A Question of Residence"
"The Pacifist"
"The Reluctant Orchid"
"Moving Spirit"
"The Defenestration of Ermintrude Inch"
"The Ultimate Melody"
"The Next Tenants"
"Cold War"
"Sleeping Beauty"
"Security Check"
"The Man Who Ploughed the Sea"
"Critical Mass"
"The Other Side of the Sky" (six individual connected stories)
"Special Delivery"
"Feathered Friends"
"Take a Deep Breath"
"Freedom of Space"
"Passer-by"
"The Call of the Stars"
"Let There Be Light"
"Out of the Sun"
"Cosmic Casanova"
"The Songs of Distant Earth"
"A Slight Case of Sunstroke"
"Who's There?"
"Out of the Cradle, Endlessly Orbiting..."
"I Remember Babylon"
"Trouble with Time"
"Into the Comet"
"Summertime on Icarus"
"Saturn Rising"
"Death and the Senator"
"Before Eden"
"Hate"
"Love That Universe"
"Dog Star"
"Maelstrom II"
"An Ape About the House"
"The Shining Ones"
"The Secret"
"Dial F for Frankenstein"
"The Wind from the Sun"
"The Food of the Gods"
"The Last Command"
"Light of Darkness"
"The Longest Science-fiction Story Ever Told"
"Playback"
"The Cruel Sky"
"Herbert George Morley Roberts Wells, Esq."
"Crusade"
"Neutron Tide"
"Reunion"
"Transit of Earth"
"A Meeting with Medusa"
"Quarantine"
"'siseneG': 'Genesis' spelled backwards"
"The Steam-powered Word Processor"
"On Golden Seas"
"The Hammer of God"
"The Wire Continuum" (with Stephen Baxter)
"Improving the Neighbourhood"
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
THE STORY:
Well, there's 104 actually. Ranging from Clarke's first ever published story, 1937's 'Travel By Wire!', right up to 'Improving The Neighbourhood', published in 1999.
WHAT'S GOOD:
Clarke's genius is clearly shown here as we read stories about various things that actually came true years later. For instance, in reading 'The Sentinel' (upon which '2001: A Space Odyssey' was based) his description of the moon's surface is so good that it's hard to believe it was written more that two decades before Armstrong actually got there. In this collection we also see Clarke's creation of what are now common, essential and taken for granted, commercial communications satellites. There's also a great many Harry Purvis stories, in which that colourful character tells stories of his own to argue a point, educate his friends or simply for entertainment. Fans of Clarke's works will also be interested in reading the short stories which went on to become some of the best loved full-length science fiction novels of all time; as I say above 'The Sentinel', 'The Songs Of Distant Earth' and 'The Hammer Of God' among a few others. There's also quite a few brief editorial notes by the man himself, giving anecdotes and the like, which adds a personal touch to the book.
WHAT'S BAD:
In an anthology of more than one hundred stories, there are bound to be some bad ones. On occasion the stories here are either boring or outdated, but I'd say they're still worth reading.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
I've owned this book in a variety of formats over the years. I love short stories, particularly those of Arthur C Clarke, Stephen King and Roald Dahl. Of those three greats, Clarke is definitely the one that makes me think the most; his stories aren't just entertaining and engaging, they're witty, way ahead of their time, and often motivate me to read further into the science behind the narrative.

I bought the Kindle version of this classic compendium, spanning the author's entire lifetime of short story work, recently, hoping that it'd be a nice way of getting reacquainted with familiar classics that I remembered fondly, as well as enabling me to re-familiarise myself with works that I may have forgotten. I wasn't disappointed. Unlike some other Kindle purchases of classic books I've made, I was delighted to find this particular volume had been expertly-transferred to the Kindle format, with none of the typos, poor formatting, lack of clear fonts and absence of e-book navigational support that some other otherwise worthy classic literary works I've purchased have sadly suffered from.

This book is a great way to pass fifteen minutes before bedtime, a boring train journey, or rainy day. I can't recommend it highly enough.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 11 January 2001
This is one fantastic book. It contains every short story ever published by legendary science fiction writer Sir Arthur C. Clarke, including some that has not been published since the '30s. Arthur C. Clarke has written a brief foreword to almost all of the stories which are presented in order of publication. From 'Travel by wire' (1937) through 'Improving the neighbourhood' (1999) this is a real treasure. In this collection ACC's visions of the future comes to life like never before. Although some of the stories are a bit dated they are no less fun. And don't worry. All your favorite ACC short stories are here. 'The Sentinel' (the inspiration for 2001), 'Second Dawn', and the short stories that would later become the novels 'Childhood's End', 'Earthlight', 'The Songs of Distant Earth' and 'The Hammer of God' are included. At 970 pages this collection will keep you up many a night. Recommended without reservation.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 2 November 2011
This is a fantastic set of essays by a master of science fiction, very worthwhile having, and a great read; I cannot recommend the contents highly enough. The problem comes with this particular paperback edition/printing, which is awful (hence only three stars - the contents are 5 stars): faint, small, words, crammed together, in what seems to be a cheaply bound book - not a good reading experience. So be aware of this and try and get a hardback version if you can.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 11 August 2013
I read the Odessy series by Arthur C Clarke when I was in high school, and he was instantly my favourite author. After reading many of his novels, and a few short stories, I thought I would just go ahead and get the full collection. I am only about 20% of the way through right now and I will add edits later when I am finished, but already, its one of my favourite books.

All the stories take you on a small journey based off of one core idea that you figure out as the story progresses. That is one of the best aspects of these stories - you get your "pay off" pretty soon. However, the characters you encounter are well fleshed out, even though there is not much development simply because of the stories being short. But still, ACC somehow manages to convey the core characters and that makes you invested in them, and thus the pay offs of the stories are genuine. And of course, the sci-fi ideas themselves are classic Clarke. If you like classic sci-fi, the you'll love these stories. They imbue in you the sense of wonder that Clarke is so good at conveying, even in the occasional dystpoic stories.

My favourite stories until now are "Retreat from Earth", "Hide and Seek" and "Rescue Party". Its a perfect book to take with you while travelling, or read on your way to work or simply before going to bed at night.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 24 February 2012
i have read Arthur C Clarke since I left Uni back in 2004, and I have always found the depth of his imagination and the way he scientifically gives credence to his stories, very refreshing. My favorite story of all time is probably The Sentinel, the story Stanley Kubrick based 2001: A Space Odyssey on. I recall Ray Bradbury saying: "I really envy his brains" in regard to Clarke, and I feel the same. He is much missed, and I wish we had an A C Clarke today, as I find most sci-fi too cliched and formulaic.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 20 January 2010
Years ago I read a collection of Arthur C. Clarke's short stories called "Of Time And Stars", which I thoroughly enjoyed.

The snow and ice at the end of last year reminded me of one of the stories, "The Forgotten Enemy", which is based in a snow and ice-bound London. So I searched for a book which included the story and found this collection.

This is a thick paperback (966 pages), absolutely packed with short stories. I rediscovered other old favourites, such as "The Reluctant Orchid" (a homage to H.G. Wells' short story "The Flowering of the Strange Orchid" but with a twist), "Hide-and-Seek" (how a sighting of a squirrel leads to a tale of set in space) and "All The Time In The World" (time can be slowed down so that art treasures can be stolen). I also found lots of stories I hadn't read.

I had forgotten how good these stories are. Considering that many were written in the late 1940s or early 1950s they are still fresh and thought-provoking.

I thoroughly recommend this book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 27 May 2012
I read many Arthur C Clarke books years ago and again more recently. The Light of Other Days was astonishing. I had never read his early short stories so this was an easy purchase. I am not disappointed. Yes, some may be lacking in depth here and there, but you are following the development of a great thinker and writer. Highly recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 29 June 2015
Presently half way through reading this, excellent collection. Arthur C Clarke is known for works which have made predictions about futures which then became reality (geostationary communications satellites are his most famous prediction), and in many ways this does too. A lot of the stories in here, including those written back in the 1940s, are astonishingly realistic in terms of some of the things which have happened since, others are a lot more speculative but also contain features which in the 40s were science fiction and have now become fats of daily life. Furthermore his older stories don't seem "dated" at all, they might have been written that long ago and yet many of them feel very much up-to-date (except ofcourse when computers are mentioned). I haven't got to his later stories yet, but I should guess they will be as good as his earlier ones. He's also thrown some excellent little funny references and such into some of the stories.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
2001: A Space Odyssey
2001: A Space Odyssey by Sir Arthur C. Clarke CBE (Paperback - 2001)
£7.19

The City And The Stars (S.F. MASTERWORKS)
The City And The Stars (S.F. MASTERWORKS) by Arthur C. Clarke (Paperback - 8 Mar. 2001)
£7.19

3001: The Final Odyssey
3001: The Final Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke (Paperback - 4 Dec. 2000)
£7.19
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.