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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fairly slow, but with a spectacular payoff.
The sixth book of The Wheel of Time takes us deep into the second act of this massive story, with the transition to a more political-oriented narrative continuing apace. Lord of Chaos is one of the more divisive books in the series, with fans praising its deeper exploration of ideas and intrigue, whilst critics bemoan the slow pace of the book compared to earlier...
Published on 8 Mar 2004 by A. Whitehead

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Halfway through with a slow start
So, book 6, finally halfway through the main series of Wheel of Time, and I'm starting to get a bit tired of the series now, especially as this one had a really slow first half. It's not that nothing was happening, but unusually for the fantasy genre, no one was travelling anywhere.

I'm a little concerned that this series doesn't have anything to help new...
Published on 21 Sep 2009 by Jim J-R


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fairly slow, but with a spectacular payoff., 8 Mar 2004
By 
A. Whitehead "Werthead" (Colchester, Essex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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The sixth book of The Wheel of Time takes us deep into the second act of this massive story, with the transition to a more political-oriented narrative continuing apace. Lord of Chaos is one of the more divisive books in the series, with fans praising its deeper exploration of ideas and intrigue, whilst critics bemoan the slow pace of the book compared to earlier volumes.

The kingdoms of Cairhien, Mayene and Tear are now sworn to the Dragon Reborn, and a successful raid on Caemlyn, capital of Andor, has seen that city fall to his forces as well. Several of the Forsaken, the most powerful servants of the Dark One, have been slain and Rand's successes look like they will continue unabated. In the south, he is assembling a vast army to send against the Forsaken Sammael in his stronghold of Illian, whilst the Aes Sedai remain divided on how to proceed with him. However, Rand's announcement of an amnesty for men who can channel has shocked the world, for all male channellers of the One Power are doomed to go mad and die, wreaking havoc as they go, and some of his enemies are prepared to move against him before that can be allowed to happen.

The theme of the sixth book in The Wheel of Time is consolidation. Rand's forces have absorbed vast amounts of territory, but before he can resume his campaign he must secure that which he holds already. With scheming against him in Andor and Cairhien underway and an outright rebellion going on in Tear, this proves a difficult task. Rand also has to find a way of dealing with both factions of the Aes Sedai, an undertaking fraught with peril. His companions also have their own problems to deal with: Perrin must prove his worthiness to his wife's parents, Mat has to deal with the issues of becoming a general, and Egwene, Elayne and Nynaeve have complex currents to negotiate amongst the rebel Aes Sedai. Even Pedron Niall, commander of the Children of the Light, has significant problems he has to overcome in both his own ranks and his dealings with the displaced Queen of Andor, whilst the surviving Forsaken scheme incessantly against one another.

The problem with this kind of stock-taking is that it is hard to work up a dramatic story about it. Instead, you end up with lots and lots of talk. Characters sitting around talking about the plot, about what has already happened and what they think might happen in the future. That's when they are not engaged in increasingly tedious and infantile discussions about male-female relations, which by this volume are starting to get a mite repetitive. The politicking and intrigue is fine as far as it goes (although fans of GRRM or Bakker may find it a bit on the shallow and simplistic side), but you do need a bit more to spice the book up. There's some fine, atmospheric interludes in the book, such as Rand taking a brief sojourn in the desolate, cursed city of Shadar Logoth, but overall the novel has serious pacing issues. Simply put, this is a 1,000-page book in which not a lot happens for the first three-quarters of it.

Towards the end, however, the pace starts to lift quite noticeably as Rand's attempts to play the two Aes Sedai factions off against one another backfire spectacularly and some of the most surprising events in the entire series take place, culminating in a massive battle at the spring of Dumai's Wells in which Jordan's sometimes-variable skills at depicting action, drama and the ability to tie together disparate storylines are put to their best effect. This late burst of action sequences and confrontations is extremely effective, and Dumai's Wells often tops readers' polls as the most satisfying moment of the entire series to date, with some fine moments right at the end of the book which hint at much greater things to come.

Lord of Chaos (****) is a sedentary novel where events unfold slowly, but do succeed in laying the groundwork for the spectacular and satisfying concluding section of the book. I suspect many readers will be put off by the slow pace, but I found the payoff to be more than worth it. The novel is available in the UK from Orbit and in the USA from Tor.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Fantasy Epic, 19 Mar 2004
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The sixth book in the wheel of time series is an excellent addition to the series but it is also the first book in the series in which the major plot lines fail to reach a suitable end point. Right through to book 10 the major plot lines are now out of sync with the length of a book, which is most unsatifying when you finish a book and have to wait for another to be published. Despite this the story remains very interesting. Events in book 6 begin to expand the epic, telling the story of a number of increasingly important supporting characters. This contributes to the size of this book, diluting some staggering events with slower tempo passages. However, the ending is simply one of the best scenes within the Wheel of time and is what really brings this book together.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Halfway through with a slow start, 21 Sep 2009
By 
Jim J-R (West Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
So, book 6, finally halfway through the main series of Wheel of Time, and I'm starting to get a bit tired of the series now, especially as this one had a really slow first half. It's not that nothing was happening, but unusually for the fantasy genre, no one was travelling anywhere.

I'm a little concerned that this series doesn't have anything to help new readers to catch up if they drop in mid-series. Admittedly this can often be grating if you have already read the previous volumes but surely leaving it out is limiting your potential sales to an already captured audience?

In the second half of this book the pace picked up again with a lot of big scenes, but again they didn't seem to be going anywhere. Overall I don't feel that the plot was advanced much in this book. It just seems like it is just a tool to set up some plot points and alter some characters opinions to get them into their places for the rest of the series.

I'm not sure any more whether I'm looking forward to reading the next volume. Hopefully it will be more exciting, but I am half tempted to take a break before continuing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book..., 18 May 2012
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I've recently gotten the kindle and decide to buy the ebooks for the wheel of time (reading them a 3rd time now), Lords of Chaos is a great book, but the kindle version of it is formatted a little weird, with full lines between paragraphs.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars editing, 17 Sep 2011
while the i find it hard to give up the series after the first 6 books, and will undoubtedly read the rest, i wish they had found a better editor. at least 50% of this book - as with all the others - should have been edited out. we get endlessly repetitive passages about the characters' thoughts and fights - nynaeve must be the worst - as well as endlessly repetitive descriptions of fashion and furniture; and these are just examples. now i just speed read, and wonder if i will read any slower when i reread it. reading Feist for example, i am never bored and he has a series of about 24 or more by now. if the 'wheel of time' series was subdivided into separate lots of 3 books, for example, with something of a conclusion at the end of each part, it would be much more fun to read. between the atrocious editing and the never-ending wait to get to the end of the last book, i wouldn't recommend the series to a new reader. to be honest, i feel a bit as if i had been lured into buying into something that would force me to read 12000 pages until at last there is a conclusion...too bad, because the series could be really good. i'd love to read a re-edited version with half the supporting cast and 65% less words
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books in the series, 31 May 2011
By 
C. Stigter - See all my reviews
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I am in the middle of converting my book library to Kindle format, and whilst reading through the Wheel of Time series again I purchased this edition.

The story has moved on from the events in the Fires of Heaven, Rand is courted by both the rebel Aes Sedai and the White Tower. Perin is a returning viewpoint in this book, and feels the pull of ta'veren upon ta'veren and heads to Caemlyn to join Rand. Rand sends Mat to protect Elayne and take her back to Caemlyn.

There is significant character development from Egwene, Nynaeve and Elayne. The latter two who undertake a mission to Ebou Dar on a mission.

Its a very enjoyable read and advances the plot further with new viewpoints in the book. Very much recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Addictive epic..., 4 Mar 2011
This is the first book in the WoT series to fail to grip the reader from the outset. It's a long one, over 1000 pages, and the first half of the book has the characters not doing a right lot; Rand's thread is occupied largely with the mundane details of running and maintaining his growing empire; Egwene, Elayne and co are sitting tight in Salidar; everyone natters away about what has gone before in a way that would be incredibly tedious had you not read the prior books in the series.

However, despite the initial slowness, I didn't have the objections that some reviewers here have. After spending five volumes getting to know these characters, spending a bit of time with them minus full-on action wasn't a problem. And the second half of 'Lord of Chaos' is every bit as brilliant as the preceding books. Characters separated for a long time are reunited, with great clashes resulting from the changes in each other. Mat, for instance, reunited with Egwene who remembers him as a layabout trouble-maker when now he commands an army, and Egwene... well, I won't give away what she becomes. And Rand's trying it on with the previously untouchable and revered Aes Sedai is great stuff, as is his struggle with staying sane what with a dead man gibbering in his head half the time.

It's the characters that drive this series for me, and I can't think of another series that gives its protagonists fourteen novels to develop across. I love it, despite its flaws- the prudish attitude to sex, the often annoying (perhaps even a tad misogynistic?) depiction of all women as thinking that men are useless lumps to be manipulated but then falling head over heals with one anyway.

The pacing is not an issue for me. Jordan's naivety sometimes is, but on the whole the pure enjoyment of character and world-building is top notch. I for one shall read on....
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, but a bit too long, 26 Jan 2000
By 
mnemonic12@hotmail.com (Peterborough, England) - See all my reviews
Yes, this book is amazing. Yes it has an amazing storyline and Dumai wells is a fantastic bit of work but, uhhh, did anyone else notice the interminable dragging of heels earlier on in the book? For a while I was scared RJ had lost it a bit, but then it whacked back better than ever great book!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Laborious, 3 Jan 2010
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SonicQuack (Essex, UK) - See all my reviews
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Lord of Chaos is over one thousand pages and there is hardly a paragraph of action in the first six hundred pages. The is plenty of recapping the previous five tomes, a necessity when there are such sheer numbers of characters. The lack of action, even a small set piece, ensures the first two thirds of this entry are tough going and there's never really any reward offered. Unbelievably the finale seems somewhat rushed and unsubstantial. There are some major plot elements revealed in Lord of Chaos, the Wheel weaves aplenty in this volume. Despite the overall lack of action, this is a middle chapter which propels the story and the last third revitalises the story enough to see it through.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Dumai Wells. Enough said..., 4 Dec 1999
By A Customer
For those of you who haven't read this book it is worth reading the other five books just so the culmination of Lord of Chaos is all the more spectacular. Your life will never be the same again. This book is almost non-stop in its drama and cliffhangers and as such it makes a fantastic half-way point in the series. Basically it is a thouroughly enjoyable read that will keep you glued to the book until you finish it and leave you begging for more.
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Lord Of Chaos: Book 6 of the Wheel of Time
Lord Of Chaos: Book 6 of the Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan (Hardcover - 17 Nov 1994)
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