Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

85 of 90 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Choose your translation with care, 18 Jan. 2005
By A Customer
Notes from Underground is a brilliant, flowing, idiosyncratic novel. It is partly an impassioned rant against certain groups in Russian society, partly a moving tragedy set in the 1840s. The underground man, who throughout speaks directly to the reader, is an ordinary man who is an extraordinary literary creation. Dostoevsky's ability to subtly craft complete, complex and stunningly real characters is a mark of all his novels, and it is demonstrated superbly in Notes from Underground.
It is only "Notes" (it runs to only 130 pages), and it is very short on Dostoevsky's skilfully crafted dialogue, but nonetheless this novel makes an excellent introduction to Dostoevsky.
You may have noticed that there are different editions of this book. Prices range from 79p to £8. You're probably thinking "why on Earth should I buy the £8 copy?"
The reason is that Pevear and Volokhonsky's translation is the only translation that counts. They are the only translators who succeed in making Dostoevsky accessible to a 21st century audience, thanks to their ruthless attention to detail at the expense of alterations which can dilute Dostoevsky's unique and flowing style of writing. No 19th century author I have ever come across writes more intelligently or conveys ideas more clearly. The great appeal this book retains even today is in part due to Pevear and Volokhonsky, as well as to Dostoevsky himself.
Furthermore, Richard Pevear's substantial introduction is essential reading. It explains the purpose of the book and the historical significance of its ideas. Dostoevsky was writing at a time when Russia had reason to be optimistic, but the warning signs in his fiction perhaps leave us clues as to why Russia still has social problems today - and why, less than 40 years after Dostoevsky's death, Russia embraced Communism and destroyed the society in which Dostoevsky had lived.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice version, 24 Aug. 2012
This review is from: Notes From The Underground (Everyman's Library) (Hardcover)
I won't attempt to critique the novel except to say, if you're looking for the quintessential Russian novel, look no further.

Nice, slim little hardback with a good introduction. A nice addition to your bookshelf or would make a good personal gift.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great addition to home library!, 15 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Notes From The Underground (Everyman's Library) (Hardcover)
Very happy with this print!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Notes From The Underground (Everyman's Library)
Notes From The Underground (Everyman's Library) by Fyodor Dostoevsky (Hardcover - 4 Mar. 2004)
£8.49
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews