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221
4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 8 July 2015
A very interesting and well told story. A fascinating journey through number theory. Highly recommended.
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on 11 April 2013
Excellent book, although it seems a little as though a story has been made out of a rather drab subject.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 27 August 2012
It's not essential to have an in depth knowledge of mathmatics to enjoy this, but to give it a five star rating it's pretty much essential.However,the book is mercifully short enough and contains enough potted biographies and related history to remain readble by normal people,as well as those who understand why the omission of the Euler System (without which there is no Class Number Formula) inhibits the Galois representations of elliptic curves against the modular forms thus not establishing the Shimura-Taniyama conjecture,which is needed to confirm the theorem in question.To be honest though the going only gets into deep water around page 100 and the author doesn't try to get clever and hinge too much on you mathmatical expertise.And if you have the ability to relinqish your self-remonstrations for incomplete understanding and just accept some of these theories in name only then the book should be a satisfactory experience.
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on 10 January 2008
an interesting book about Mathematics and about mathematicians both the famous and not so famous
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on 16 May 2015
Very good book. Doesn't go into great detail, but a perfect introduction/ overview of the topic
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on 12 September 1998
This book is a tour guide to the highlights of mathematics development from Pythagoras onward.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 11 April 2002
Be prepared to leave this world and enter another. Besides finding very interesting historical and easy to follow mathematical facts (with some interesting easy to follow proofs at the end of the book) you may well find yourself experiencing strong emotions (what may surprise you if you are a cold mathematician). Fermat's last theorem states that for every n \in {3,4,...} there are no x,y,z \in N={1,2,...} such that x^n + y^n = z^n. Even the theorem is a statement that every child can now understand the greatest mathematical minds failed to prove it for 250 years. "I have found a simple and yet brilliant proof, which this margin is too small to show." Is this statement of Pierre de Fermat true or not is still a mystery. Wiles' proof is so complex and requires so much of the mathematical knowledge in the field that only a few mathematicians in the world have a privilege to follow it and understand it. After you read this book you will feel differently. Congratulations to Simon Singh, Andrew Wiles and all the people contributed to Fermat's Last Theorem. (\in = is element of, x^n = x to the power of n) QED
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on 13 December 2014
This book gives a definitive history of the quest to prove Fermat's last theorem.
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on 4 March 2015
Very well presented story of some quite technical maths aimed at the non expert.
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on 14 July 2014
It was very interesting to read. I was expecting it to be dry but it was not.
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