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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent. My favourite of the series
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is definitely a pivotal point in the series. The first 3 books managed to get by on the novelty of Harry joining the wizarding world, coupled with the fact his life becomes under an ever increasing threat. This hasn't been exhausted, but isn't enough on its own to sustain a forth book or indeed the rest of the series. JK Rowling...
Published on 13 Aug 2005 by Chris Chalk

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3.0 out of 5 stars Good price but book is damaged
I bought this book for a really good price for a hardback BUT when the package arrived it came in no dust jacket and had spillage and pen marks on the spine and the ends were badly scuffed. I would like to think the book was 'acceptable' but they labelled it 'very good' which it wasn't. However, I got it for a very cheap price so I guess it's okay just to read.
Published 2 months ago by mrs deborah thurston


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved it!, 6 Aug 2000
By A Customer
I'm 19 year old guy, & for me, the world of Harry Potter has been a life-changing experience. Under normal circumstances I'd feel like admitting that I'm hooked on a children's book series at the age of 19 is like still sleeping with my baby blanket or something. I mean, I'm not exactly what u would call a compulsive reader. But the Harry Potter books are different--like a real life fireworks display! Horgwart's brought my imagination back to life, literally. I mean, after years of limiting myself to couch potatoe literature, like Sports Illustarted & Tennis Magazine, I AM ACTUALLY IN LOVE WITH BOOKS AGAIN! The wizards, witches, broomsticks, cauldrons, potions, ghosts, goblins, muggles, house-elves, half-giants, secret passages, moving photographs, gismos, gadgets, spellbooks, curses, jinxes, & all the REAL feelings & emotions of the characters, have me, literally, enthralled with life! I feel more intellectual than I ever have before, & anything is possible.
Ok, before I get too fluffy, maybe I should tak about the Goblet of Fire, huh! Despite the feelings of some that this book is too long, the beginning too slow, yada, yada, yada...whatever, I loved it! The other three were great, but I think as Harry Potter & co start coming into their own, so to should the orgaization & body of the novels. Sticking to the 200-300 page standard simply because it is traditional, just doesn't promote creativity. Asking for a compact plot doesn't make sense. Let the novel take shape as Rowling sees fit. I don't mind the Dursleys & their cartoony feel. But I do hope Rowling fits a "useful" muggle into the next 3. Saying this, I hesitate, because Hermione, let us not forget, comes from an all-muggle family. I love Hermione's work-ethic, her logic, her playfulness, and her sarcasm, & I think Ron's discovery of her, especially, as a GIRL, worked really well. I look forward to seeing how that pans out later.
Overall, this is my favorite of the 4, followed closely by Sorceror's Stone. Some of my favorite parts include the Weasley's floo powder entrance into Uncle Vernon's living room, the Quittich world cup, Hermione's SPEW house-elf obsession, the Ball, the moment Cedric & Harry touch the Triwizard Cup, & the capture of the FLY in the jar--fly in the ointment more like it! The books are truly amazing, & missing out on them is not an option!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Literary Magic, 4 Aug 2000
By A Customer
Ok, lets set the scene. As an "intellectual" reader, I used to sneer at adults reading what I considered to be childrens nonsense. "It's about a wizard boy with magic powers you say?, Oh for gods sake". However, on the recommendation of a trusted literary acquaintance, I purchased a copy of the first Harry book to take on holiday with me. I read it last, after finishing everything else I could lay my hands on. What can I say, I was astonished. The book had me gripped from beginning to end , like no book had in years. On my return to GB, I read the other two (equally excellent) and awaited the new one with baited breath. Although 700 pages long it took me less than a week to read it. I carried it everywhere, to the toilet, on buses, in lifts. Anywhere I might be able to fit in a paragraph or two. In my opinion this may well be the best yet. It's certainly one of the most engaging. Rowling is one of the only authors I can thing of who appears able to write to the same standard with each book. Even the greats occasionally turned out rubbish. However, one thing I would say about this book is that, as Harry ages so too does Rowlings' target audience. This book is definately not aimed at children. In fact, I'm not even sure I would want my young child to read it at all. [People get tortured, hands get chopped off etc etc.]. Having said that, if you are over 12, this book is an absolute must. And to all the cynics out there, swallow your pride and read these books. You don't know what you're missing
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enchanting., 14 July 2000
By A Customer
Being a huge Star Wars fan, I shall relate. This book is to the Harry Potter Series what The Empire Strikes Back was to Star Wars. It is pivotal, however, if you haven't read the first 3, get them and read them first. Book IV is a stand alone book, but it's so much more enchanting to read when you know the entire background. It is highly emotional. Some of you adults want emotion, well she gives it you in great big chunks. You may put down your romance novel and pick up Harry Potter. It breaks some ground and leaves you hanging, only wanting more. I wonder really and truly if Ms Rowling knows what she has started. There has never been a series of books where people are absolutely flooding the bookstores to get their own copy, or at least to my recollection. It's as if the Beatles were back in town and everyone wants a piece. The great thing about it is that you won't be let down and you'll never get enough. It's like a drug it is so addictive to read. Really, who has read book IV that is not ready for book V?
Book IV is great for a variety of reasons but none no more illusive than the topics discussed actually hit home with those who read it! These books are not really about magic, but about life. For example, there's the whole dating topic! How eloquantly done. Then there's the relationship between Ron and Harry. Not to mention the whole bit with Hermoine and the house elves. There's also the fact that this book proves that the other three Harry Potter books were not just luck. Warning to critics: Ms Rowling is improving. You get ready, because she's going to strut her stuff and silence all the critics. Very well written, witty and strong with plot and mystery, this book is a must for everyone.
There are those who think this book is for for children. Nonsense. I am 23 and I utterly enjoyed each and everyone. Actually I bought the first Harry Potter some time ago when it first came out not even knowing that it was a children's book because it was in the new bestseller's list. It hadn't even been out that long in the states. So i got it and read it and was addicted. Oh, then I found out it was supposed to be a kid's book. Dang! I'm 23. I'm not supposed to read a kids book. However, I didn't feel that my adultness has been threatened in any way. As a matter of fact, I think the books themes are more adult than one may realize at first reading. And many of your children's books were not really written for children. So what does it matter if it can be found in the children's section of the bookstore (chances are it will be the first book you see as you walk in, now as opposed to when I first bought it)? Some of our greatest literay works are children's books. So get the book, be a kid again and have a little fun.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not A Page Wasted, 13 July 2000
By A Customer
When you've finished reading HP4, stand on a chair (to keep it away from anybody who was expecting to get their hands on it right after you - let them get their own copy) and read it again! Densely plotted yet still coherent on the first read through, the foreshadowings and double meanings that leap out of the text once you know how it twists make this the greatest HP yet. It's probably a good idea to go back and read the first 3 books as well; I'm betting there are some subtle pointers in there too, as well as the ones that now seem obvious. (You have read the first 3 books haven't you? If not, don't start with this one.)
HP4 bears out the advance reports that the series will be aimed at an audience that matures alongside Harry and his friends. As promised, there is the adolescent romantic angst (excruciatingly funny, from the safe side of 25 at least), still stretched taut enough to twang promisingly when the book ends. More seriously, by the end of the book, the black & white of Voldemort's and Harry's camps (both pretty much pure hues in the first two books) have both developed their own tones of grey.
Without giving away too much of the plot, I'd also like to reassure fellow members of the women-who-were-Hermione-when-they-were-at-school-club who, like me, were a bit miffed that our heroine seemed to be in danger of being sidelined and stereotyped in HP2, and were only partially mollified by her greater involvement in HP3, that JK Rowling has completely acquitted herself here. We get to see a Hermione who has not one, but two fields of triumph outside the classroom, without her becoming stereotyped in the other direction. (She's also exhibit A in an illustration of how not to go about starting a revolution for social justice).
The only problem now is how to survive 'til the next one. I've always found fan-fiction to be a wince-inducing experience, but with those tantalising little hooks gleaming all over the place, I'm seriously tempted to start making my own entertainment (and if any of the rest of you are thinking along the same lines, you'd better let go of Bode & Croaker right now - I saw them first). As far as I can see, the only way to resist is to escape into a parallel universe and wait out the time chilling with Charlie Weasley (he's handy with a wand, he pokes affectionate fun at Men Who Love Dragons Too Much, he darns his own fireproof balaclava).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Growing Up is Never Easy, 10 July 2000
By A Customer
Well now we have the fourth term for Harry at Hogwarts and the early days of adolescence; this really is the book where Harry, and all his friends, really do start to grow up. It is also the book that shows that the world of magic isn't all fun, that there are real issues at the core of this series. We have some very uncomfortable family situations; interesting information about the prejudices that even wizards can harbour; further proof that the effects of Lord V's evil are deeply imbedded throughout the world of magic, all of which lead the reader to question who can you really trust.
At the most basic level HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE, is an inter-school competition story (and it is good to discover, if not explore, that there are other schools of magic around the world), three quests to test the skills, talents and heroism of the participants. Of course Harry shouldn't really even be taking part (but when have rules ever stopped him before?) and his achievements are as much about what he and others learn about his real inner qualities, as they are about winning.
It also marks the very solid return of Lord V, a climactic battle between him and Harry (with a number of what you can only call STAR WARS references), plus further exploration of just how evil and dangerous Lord V and his followers really are. While before we have always had Lord V as a presence (his sixteen year old self from Tom Riddle's diary, or as a memory), the real and very solid magician shows how he manages to inspire such devotion and fear in equal measure.
HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE is the essential bridge for J.K. Rowling to build her story's arc towards the inevitable confrontation between the forces of good and evil. While preparing readers for the fact that as the battle continues you shouldn't bet on all the characters you love surviving to the end of the series.
I hope that with the immense success this title has already achieved that it will allow J.K. Rowling to complete the series her way, free from editorial interference, or arguments about what is, or is not, appropriate for children to read about. The sequence has already turned into a children's literary classic because it works on so many different levels, and a big part of that has been J.K. Rowling's belief that life isn't simple, that intense emotions, betrayal, failure, loss are essential to understanding the world...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You don't want to hear this again, but its great., 8 July 2000
By 
Harry Potter. Well I guess that everyone's fed up with reading reviews that say it's all excellent, but, sorry, here comes another one. "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" does of course have all the great aspects of all the previous books. I won't go too far into them because you already know all the words, but just to refresh your memory... enthralling plot... characters which really seem alive... good versus evil...etc. There are some differences between this book and the last three. Personally, I loved the fact that the book was so much longer because it meant extra Harry Potter (I'm probably starting to get boring round about... now.) I found a disappointing lack of Quidditch..., but the main difference is that the whole attitude of the book is older. Don't let that put you off, because I think that the strategy of aging with the audience adds to the believability personal closeness of the story. Love interest exists, but in different ways than I had thought it would appear. None of the three main characters end up with who I thought they would (but maybe later?)... The humour is also far more adult (I mean, how else can you interpret the mention of inappropriate charms on a goat?) and I found this book not only more scary but much more funny. I found a lack of those clever little details such as the Mirror of Erised which was in the first book, but then maybe I haven't looked enough yet! The entire phenomenon is getting more dangerous, not just because of the Dark Lord, but each book increases in its adictiveness. This book will not cure a Harry Potter craving, as the end of the book (appropriately called "The Beginning") leaves you as captured by the plot as ever, and, of course, I'll complete the horrific clichés for you, leaves you dying for more.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It was so exciting I couldn't put it down. Brilliant!, 10 July 2000
By A Customer
It was 9 o'clock in the morning when we went to get Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. It took me two days to read it, and it was so exciting I couldn't take my eyes off it even at night!
The Goblet of Fire has some brilliant new characters. The best one is Professor Alasdor "Mad Eye" Moody, who has a magical eye, a wooden leg, and is covered with scars. Another new character is Mr Crouch, who is one of the Triwizard tournament judges.
The Triwizard Tournament is very dangerous. Every four years, three wizards take part in it, but this year there are four. Guess who the fourth one is? You know, it's obvious!
Three wizard schools are in the tournament. Hogwarts, then Durmstrang, who arrive for the tournament by boat, and Beauxbatons, whose English is not very good and who arrive in a carriage pulled by giant flying horses. Other creatures in the tournament are dragons, mer-people, boggarts, scrouts and giant spiders.
An old baddie comes back and has a duel with Harry. It was so exciting I could see the story happening in front of my eyes! It was scary.I was really worried!
Someone falls in love but this is not a book full of kissing.
This book has more magic than the other three and I think this is the most exciting of the four books. The next book I want to read is...the fifth Harry Potter book! I wonder what the cover's going to be like?
You should really read it. It's great!
Seumas MacDonald, aged 7
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, innovative - new maturity of hero, plot and author, 10 July 2000
By A Customer
I was concerned about possible diappointment before reading the 4th Harry Potter as I did not see how it could possible live up to the standards of inventiveness and suspense set with the 1st 3 books. I was engrossed from the 1st page. JK Rowling has developed yet another highly satisfactory twist in her history of Harry Potter. New rituals and tournaments are introduced as long established, traditional wizard activities, cleverly combining magical innovations with just enough 'Muggle'-related content to allow us to empathise with the characters. From drunken xenophobia at the world cup to the impact of highly creative 'kiss and tell' style journalism on its subjects - we can relate to Harry's world even as we are gripped by the unfolding of events totally unrelated to our own lives. Having missed clues in the earlier books I was determined to keep my mind alert to all possibilities but I was still genuinely surprised at the final chapters...Nothing happened in the way I had imagined it might and when the death came - I cried. Congratulations and thanks to JK Rowling - it was a story well worth waiting for. PS My reading of the book was constantly interrupted by my children asking anxiously how their favourite characters were doing as we are only on Chapter 6 of the Chamber of Secrets for our bedtime reading. I have not given any of the story away to them but assume our reading topics for the next few months are set!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars OH MY GOD, Joanne, I didn't know books like this existed!, 29 July 2000
By A Customer
Joanne has pulled out all the stops again in the making of a enchanting, thrilling, creative and hilarious sequel. (You might of guessed buy now that I could possibly like this book!)
Winner of Author Of The Year and Whitbread Childrens Award recently, and she also was narowly beaten by Seamus Heaney for the full Whitbread Book Of The Year.What do I say to that? SHE MUST BE BETTER. No questions.
Harry's insane Aunt and Uncle are frightened into letting Harry go to the Quddich World Cup by Sirus (Harry's Godfather who is an acused murderer) and a whale of a time, most of the time, that is. Because Harry is getting painful dreams which include Voldemort, oops, I mean, He Who Must Not Be Named who haunted Harry's dreams for 3 three years because Voldemort murdered Harry's parents when he was 1 year old.
But that isn't all that's in store for Harry. The Triwizard Tornament is coming up and something fishy is going on, what with Harry is reaching puberty and starting to feel strongly for Cho, and the new defence aganst the dark arts teacher has some news for Harry about his parents... That isn't all. Some people are acting oddly recently, and Harry's dreams about Voldemort are getting stronger...
I think it's definatly worth the wait that JK made us. Full prase to her for this fantastic novel, and I just hope the other books are this good!
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best ever supression of whingeing during long car journeys., 24 Aug 2001
By A Customer
This kept two children enthralled and two adults entertained on a journey from Wales to Scotland and back even though the boys and I had already read it. Anything that suppresses the 'Are we there yet' enquiries from the kids and all other whingeing and squabbling in the back of the car without boring me to desperation fully deserves a five star rating.
It is excellently read and well characterised. Yes, it is expensive, but will be used repeatedly and passed round to other desperate parents so is good overall value.
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