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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent. My favourite of the series
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is definitely a pivotal point in the series. The first 3 books managed to get by on the novelty of Harry joining the wizarding world, coupled with the fact his life becomes under an ever increasing threat. This hasn't been exhausted, but isn't enough on its own to sustain a forth book or indeed the rest of the series. JK Rowling...
Published on 13 Aug 2005 by Chris Chalk

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3.0 out of 5 stars Good price but book is damaged
I bought this book for a really good price for a hardback BUT when the package arrived it came in no dust jacket and had spillage and pen marks on the spine and the ends were badly scuffed. I would like to think the book was 'acceptable' but they labelled it 'very good' which it wasn't. However, I got it for a very cheap price so I guess it's okay just to read.
Published 2 months ago by mrs deborah thurston


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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent. My favourite of the series, 13 Aug 2005
By 
Chris Chalk "Chris" (Croydon, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is definitely a pivotal point in the series. The first 3 books managed to get by on the novelty of Harry joining the wizarding world, coupled with the fact his life becomes under an ever increasing threat. This hasn't been exhausted, but isn't enough on its own to sustain a forth book or indeed the rest of the series. JK Rowling appears well aware of this and decided to really expand not only Harry as a character, but also the world he operates in. This really allows the reader to be drawn into the fact we are observers in a world that is no less complicated than our own, and the dynamics within it are not black and white.
Harry begins the 4th years in dramatic fashion, a visit from the Weasley family doesn't quite go to plan, much to the dismay of the Dursley's, but this does not stop Harry from attending the Quidditch World Cup. For the first time Harry grasps the size of the wizarding world he is apart of, realising there must be many other schools all over the world to accommodate all the wizards that clearly must exist. Harry's enlightenment is short lived however, resulting in his trip being cut short, this though is forced to the back of Harry's mind as the elder male Weasley's are being delicately evasive with Harry, Ron and Hermione...
Harry returns to Hogwarts buoyed by his time at the Weasley's and just like everyone else at Hogwarts is instantly fascinated by the prospect of a replaying of an old school tournament played between the 3 greatest European Schools. Each school can only have one champion and to ensure fair play, the Goblet of Fire is used to big the entrants. Does someone have it in for Harry though?
This book really begins to highlight the strengths Harry is developing, highlighting his bravery and loyalty, whilst also showing that at times he is fallible, and when all said and done he is just a 14 year old boy...
The writing in this book is superb, the pace is spot on and although the book is lengthy you will race through it as if it was half the length. I really cannot give this book enough superlatives, the writing of JK Rowling has clearly improved and isn't as simplistic as the earlier books, maybe its because it's the middle book that this transformation has happened, or maybe it's just coincidence but whatever the reason, I am so glad it happened as this book really makes the series so far.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting, engaging, entertaining, and well worth the wait!, 18 July 2000
By 
I now know I am not alone among thirty-somethings, who look forward excitedly to each new Harry Potter, and then feel something akin to a sense of loss upon finishing each book. I 'discovered' Harry in April, and since then have been waiting expectantly for book 4, which I read in just a few days (it would have been less, but my husband has started to feel a little neglected when Harry's around). This book did not seem to me to be any longer than the others, and it was just as enjoyable, if not moreso than all except perhaps book 3. I found it a gripping read, quite scary in places, although the sure knowledge that there are three more books to come, means that we can rest assured Harry will survive, and good will overcome evil.
JK Rowling's grip on her characters and the constant references to small details from the previous three books which help provide context and explanations as the stories unfold, are testimony to a brilliant mind in my view. Having read all four books now, like many other fans, I am eagerly awaiting the next book, and the one after that... I wonder do other readers feel like me, a sense of real friendhip with the three main characters? I really care what happens to them, and have even begun to hope fervently that Ron and Hermione are able to overcome their adolescent embarrassment and realise their true feelings for each other! Is there any hope for me? I have no children yet, but one on the way in February, and, boy or girl, I will be reading Harry Potter to them as soon as they are old enough to understand and enjoy as much as I do.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An exciting and gripping continuation of a wonderful story., 11 July 2000
By A Customer
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, though eagerly awaited, is far from anti-climatic in providing the latest instalment of Harry Potter's journey through his time at Hogwarts. He and his friends and fellow students, now maturing fast, are put to the test in ever more challenging ways in 636 pages that span the full width of scenarios available to the life of a 14 year-old wizard. On the one hand, Harry and Co have to contend with an ever increasing workload at school whilst, on the other, cope with the dawning realisation that the irrepressibly evil Voldemort is on his way to achieving full power once more. Throw in the final of the Quidditch World Cup, a Triwizard Tournament that lasts a full academic year and a Yule Ball which forces an unusual choice of partners, and we have a cocktail of excitement and intrigue which keeps the readers' interest throughout, without flagging, and reflects too the inescapable realisation that the characters also have hormones! The tension builds throughout this book and races eventually towards a frightening and disturbing conclusion, carrying death and tested loyalties along with it. The book is far from being too long - it needs to be to satisfy all of the ingredients - and, once at the end, one is left wishing there were just a few more pages to continue the story, the starting blocks having been well and truly set for the fifth book. The way that readers of all ages are compelled to fall in with the wonderfully varied characters, and the way they interact, is as strongly apparent in this book as in any of its predecesssors and it is remarkable for children in particular to have such a compulsion to sit down for hours on end with a book open; it's just a shame to have to wait a whole year now until the next one.....
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another masterpiece from J.K.Rowling!, 8 July 2000
By A Customer
The time is 8:40 pm on the 8th of July and I have just finished reading Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. I am going to review this book (well, tell you what I think of it) but first I would like to aks if anyone knows of anybody who finished reading this book before me who got it this morning, I started reading this book at aproximately 11 am and read non-stop all today (apart from lunch and dinner). I am VERY pleased with myself for this...Anyway, like I said in my title, 'Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire' is an amazing book and has lived up to its predecessors. I have read and loved all the Harry Potter books and I am a great fan of reading. There aren't many books that could have kept me reading for a whole day non stop however - the only other one I can think that could do this are any of the Redwall books written by Brian Jaques and books written by Tamora Pierce (tales of Allanna's and Daines adventures). I enjoy Harry Potter books so mcuh because i can get so easily into the story and plot. I love all the characters in the books and the plot is so interesting and detailed from the first paragraph that I can barely put the book down once i have started. I am very grateful to J.K.Rowl;ing for making this book so much longer than the others because, I get through good books at a rate of knots. Looking back, I should have saved the book, not read it all at once but nenever mind. Some people might be put off by the books size but if they are then they are missing out on a lot because it is a brilliant book. Some people might also think that the book will not be interesting all the time because it is so long but they are also wrong. 'Harry Potter and The Goblet of Fire' is an amzing book and I would reccomend it to everyone. I can't explain why I, and millions of people around the world, enjoy these books so much, they are just amazing and I can't put it better than that. I am reccomending this book to anyone who can read and if anyone doesn't read it they are missing out hugely. I can't wait for the next part of the series to be published, even though it will be a long wait and I am looking forward to the film... Bye!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful word play, 24 July 2000
By A Customer
OK, I admit it - I'm older than 13, by about 30 years - and I find the Harry Potter stories funny, moving, exciting and witty. Yes, The Goblet of Fire is a long book, and maybe the Quidditch World Cup is a bit of a diversion, but it introduces a lot of the main players in this story and provides some fantastical echoes of the recent European Championships. I love the names that J.K.Rowling conjures up: Durmstrang, a nice Spoonerism of "Sturm und Drang", the Blast-Ended Skrewt - a double-ended danger, the larger than life Madame Maxime, the Malfoy heavies Crabbe and Goyle. Even the magic incantantions (watch out for curses all you stage magicians!) have an authority which keeps you from reading them out loud, especially if you've got a wand in your hand. And J.K. did not miss an opportunity to highlight the hazards caused by intrusions by the tabloid press. How did they stop everyone (except one person) getting hold of the manuscript until publishing date? I'm pleased they did, and I'm not going to reveal the ending. Most enjoyable.
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34 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a must for long car journeys, 21 Aug 2001
By A Customer
We took this on holiday with us. We travelled from Aberdeen to Norfolk with hardly any complaints from either children or adults. Stephen fry kept us all rapt by his superb story telling. It is wonderful hearing the voices he has for all the different characters. We now have all four of these books on audio and they have been worth every penny.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lots of great little touches, 9 Jun 2001
By A Customer
There were all sorts of little things that made me love this book. I work in a bookshop and on the day it came out we, like many other places had "Harry Potter Day". The games and costumes, however were not as good or as amusing as the sight of people of all ages and backgrounds poring over the book, unable even to take a break from reading for long enough to buy it and go home! I think we sold over 450 copies in one day? quite a stunning amount anyway.
The reason I am writing this was to point out a lot of the little touches that turn the books from great adventure stories into classics. To begin, though, this book is great. I would not agree that it is "too long" and think the criticisms about JK Rowling moving away from her "target audience" are daft. Would these same people cristicise The Lord Of The Rings for not being for the same "target audience" as The Hobit?! Why do we have to think about classic books in terms of "target audiences"? Even The Chronicles of Narnia dealt with gradually more adult themes throughout the books, ending with the death of all the main characters!
Little things that I really enjoyed in this paticular book were...
1. The ongoing love/hate relationship between Ron and Hermione, especially Ron's phrase "Hey Hermione...you're a girl..."
2. Harry and Ron's way of talking about the magical world's equivalent of "gear" i.e the Firebolt's aerodynamic perfection-this is so like some of my best friends that I laughed out loud.
3. The cartoonish world of the Dursleys has been dismissed as "cartoonish" but hey, cartoons are fun, and these episodes of the book really are funny. ("We didn't give it to him because he's a Muggle, we gave it to him because he's a great bullying git!") Without this humour, these scenes could be really quite dreary and void of hope, but we see things through Harry's eyes, and his defence against the Dursleys is to laugh at them.
4. The complex circle of relationships of Harry's parents' friends that emerges mainly in Azkaban, but develops further in this book.
5. Hermione's championing of the house-elves. I don't think it detracts from the plot. I also love the scene in which Winky becomes an alcoholic-very funny.
6. Hagrid's crush, arguement with and later friendship with Madame Malkin.
7. The whole Rita Skeeter thing-a nice satire.
8. One of my favourite scenes is when Harry goes to see Dumbledore and falls into the Pensive. Neville's background is something that most readers, like Harry and the others, would have taken for granted. Good reading.
9. The brilliant ending, of course. Can't wait to see that as a film, if it's well made. It seems silly to see the death of Cedric as a "cop-out"-if anything, the tension between Harry and Cedric over Cho throws Harry's feelings over the death into sharper relief. 10. However probably the thing that made me laugh most in the whole book was the fact that England didn't even qualify for the Quidditch World Cup but "went out to Transylvania in the first round. Bloody embarassing!".
Excellent entertainment, combined with deeper issues. Full marks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, but I agree it needs more heroine girls!, 10 Sep 2000
By A Customer
I liked this book, but Hermione is the only girl who actually does anything brave and even then Harry comes out a better wizard. Fleur lost the Triwizard Tournament--I thought she should have pulled third at least, since second place was, well, impossible. If Krum lost it wouldn't be so bad, he's a great Quidditch player anyway, and just being pulled out of the Goblet of Fire is honor enough.
If you haven't read the book and this is all confusing you, here is a summary;
Harry goes back to school to find that the Triwizard Tournament will be held at Hogwarts this year. Two other schools will come to Hogwarts and all sixth and seventh year students will place their names in the Goblet of Fire, the judge to see whole will be in the Triwizard Tournament. The wizards (there are supposed to be three, one per school) will complete three tasks and whoever completes best, wins!
Two other schools come, Beauxbatons and Durmstrang. Fleur Delacour, part veela, and Victor Krum, star Quidditch player, are the students from the other schools whose names emerge from the Goblet of Fire. Though Harry is NOT a sixth or seventh year student, his name also comes out of the Goblet of Fire. (This is somewhat not surprising. Harry always ends up doing things that no other student does.) He is also the FOURTH wizard turning the tournament somewhat into a Quadwizard one.
Contrary to rumors, TWO people die in this book. One of them has appeared in the previous books but one has not. The ending is a little too creepy but otherwise I would reccomend it. Equally as good as the other books--better because it's longer! The book is indeed VERY long but I don't mind at all, because we get more Harry Potter.
-Jujube
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE BEST BOOK EVER WRITTEN!, 14 Aug 2000
By A Customer
There are those who say this book was too long. I, along with all my friends, would be overjoyed if the books doubled in size as the series progressed. Probably the most common complaint is that the beginning is slow. I thought it was riveting - to find out more about You-Know-Who's past, and then to go on to the Quidditch Match. If there had been six stars, I would have given all six. Some people say these are not children's books. I've read it, my 8 year old brother has read it, my best friend has read it, his 8 year old brother has read it, and his 6 year old sister had it read to her. None of us have had bad dreams. Instead, I've been continually wishing that I would dream about it - at least then I would turly experience the books.
Recently, I took a class at a local college. Every single kid in the class had read it; every single kid loved it. I am twelve years old; I loved reading about kids somewhere near my age.
My favorite character is Hermione. Like me, she's smart (although I'm nowhere near as studious and smart as she is). She's bossy, like me, and not quite what you would call pretty.
I think J.K. Rowling is the best author ever. I've read all the 'great' children's authors; J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, Roald Dahl, etc., and J.K. Rowling surpasses them all. I finished the fourth book in an hour, and I would have loved it even more if it had been six thousand pages long! I don't know if I'll be able to live until the fifth comes out. i've already ordered a copy.
All I wish for now is that Joanne won't stop with seven books. I know everyone would love to read an eighth, and a ninth, and a tenth!
If you haven't read the fourth Harry Potter, READ IT! Even if you hate reading, you'll love this book!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Certain to be Remembered as a Classic Novel, 10 Aug 2000
By A Customer
The time has come to write the review of what is certainly the most publicized book of the year and perhaps of the decade. Most books that receive this level of attention from the press are pure and inexcusable garbage... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is different - its good. No, its more than simply good, its wonderful. Much has been made of both the book and J.K. Rowling's worldly success from the book. In my less than humble opinion, both its fame and her recently acquired wealth are wholly justified. For years the world has rewarded the greedy and the athletically gifted; for once, a person who has actually done something of lasting importance has been accorded the just rewards of such an achievement.
Now then, as to the book. First of all, be thankful you are looking at the amazon.uk website and can purchase the original edition of the novel. What Scholastic Press and their editors did to the American version of this book, as well as all the other three volumes, is unforgivable. They butchered it. They Americanized it. They added illustrations. In essence, they dumbed it down. This is an English book. It takes place in a traditional boarding school, not an American high school. The Hogwarts staff are headed by a headmaster, not a principal. The school employs a gamekeeper. The students take tea, they observe Boxing Day, they wear jumpers and trainers. Quiddich is much more like football (what you Yanks call soccer) than American football. Apparently, some all wise American editor, him or herself a bit unfamiliar with English colloquialisms, decided that American children are incapable of understanding the vernacular of the language as spoken in England. (Heaven forbid they might actually expand their vocabularies by exposure to new words.) This is unfortunate as it insults our children as well as ruins a splendid book by taking it out of its proper setting. I shudder to think of what Hollywood is going to do to it latter this year.
To write that the book is a thumping good read, a marvelous tale of fancy and fantasy, is almost superfluous at this point. So much has been written on it that anything more would just be guilding the lily. The task now is to establish why the book is important, not why it is good. For if it can be established as important, perhaps the prejudices of the few who, though they have not read it, still maintain opposition to it might be overcome. They seem to fear the magic and the fantastic nature of the school; thinking it will somehow guide their poor benighted young into the abyss. As every Gryffindor knows, "Balderdash!"
Harry Potter, the eponymous hero of the series, is a naturally brave and good hearted young man. However, he is just that - young. His goodness is tempered with a good bit of boyish mischief. He sneaks out at night, he plays practical jokes, and he holds occasional prejudices. However, he is at Hogwarts to learn to be a proper wizard, and by this, a proper man. In this development, he learns not only his strengths but his limits. He learns what it is to be a true friend and what it is to have a true friend. All in all, the novel is very moral indeed, for it demonstrates quite clearly the consequences for bad or malicious behavior and shows how hard work, diligence, practice, patience, and honesty (combined, as these things always are, with a little luck) produce the best results in the end. Of course, there is a bit of reality involved as well. The evil are not always overcome and those who appear evil are not always such.
Which brings the question to some of the larger points of the book. Surprising as it may be to the anti-Potterites, the novels teach the ugly side of prejudice. They confront racism and racial supremacy, and show them for the evils that they are. They impart the importance of judging a person not by what they have, but by who they are in their hearts. They teach the importance of trust and of forgiveness. Can anyone of sound mind really oppose such things?
Are the novels suitable for very young children? No. They do address some fairly serious topics - death, evil, treachery, crime, and malice. Reading them with or to early primary school children (as I have known to be done) is probably not for the best, as not only will the darker parts frighten them, they will miss much of the significance of the story as well. Beyond that, they are open and fair game. I myself would advise them as appropriate for those from the age of Harry in the first book (eleven) or a few years earlier. As the series progresses, Harry and his friends age and the topics become appropriately more serious. By the present book, Harry is beginning to notice girls as something other than just differently proportioned boys. The readers will need to be able at least to empathize with these feelings to get the full effect of the story. As always, if you are concerned about the book's contents, read it with your child. However, I will certainly attest that they contain nothing tawdry or corruptive in any way.
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Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Unabridged 14 Audio Cassette Set)
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Unabridged 14 Audio Cassette Set) by Stephen Fry (Audio Cassette - 4 April 2001)
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