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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating
This book seems to have been a little forgotten about. Groundbreaking, it shows the determination and ingenuity of Diana to get it written in the first place. This was no dumb blonde. This was a woman who could have accepted her unhappy existence and put up & shut up but she chose to take back ownership of her life which was no mean feat in those days. This seems was her...
Published 8 months ago by Wonder

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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An interesting, but familiar read.
Like most of these books, this text takes you through many of the (now well known) stories in Diana’s life - namely the eating disorder, the suicide attempts, the collapse of the “Royal Fairytale”, including the incessant influence of Camilla Parker-Bowles. This is perhaps a more personal account than other such texts, given that it is based on...
Published on 18 Aug. 2002 by Christine Medway


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22 of 23 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An interesting, but familiar read., 18 Aug. 2002
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Like most of these books, this text takes you through many of the (now well known) stories in Diana’s life - namely the eating disorder, the suicide attempts, the collapse of the “Royal Fairytale”, including the incessant influence of Camilla Parker-Bowles. This is perhaps a more personal account than other such texts, given that it is based on tape-recorded interviews that Diana herself gave to Morton in the early 90’s.
Despite its ample publicity, I wouldn’t rush out to buy this book – there aren’t actually many surprises in here. Most of it reiterates what we have already heard numerous times in the media. In many ways it is a sad and arguably incomplete version of her life, but does touch upon some interesting discussion points, particularly around the position of the traditional monarchy in modern society, Diana’s image both in life and in death, and what “the people” (continue to) bring to such matters.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, 17 Oct. 2014
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This book seems to have been a little forgotten about. Groundbreaking, it shows the determination and ingenuity of Diana to get it written in the first place. This was no dumb blonde. This was a woman who could have accepted her unhappy existence and put up & shut up but she chose to take back ownership of her life which was no mean feat in those days. This seems was her only way out, to cleverly expose what was going on in order to not loose her children which would have inevitably happened had she taken different action to free herself from her situation. Was she a loose cannon? Possibly, but with all of the challenges she faced throughout her short life who can blame her. She lacked the real personal love that most of us take for granted from our parents, siblings & partners. She was a pawn for most of her life so even though it was tragically short I'm glad she had a few years of freedom & happiness before her untimely death. Diana changed the face of the modern royal family with this book and all for the better.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A tragic story, 27 Jan. 2014
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I never read this book when it was first published despite outrage in Royal circles and deep hostility towards the book's author, Andrew Morton. It was only after Diana's death in August 1997 that it was republished 'in her own words' making it clear that the book had her full co-operation. She speaks about her unhappy childhood after her parents divorced and her father's remarriage to her step-mother who she hated. After this unhappy start in life, she was then perhaps too young and naive for marriage at the age of 19 to Prince Charles. She was quite happy at that time living her life as a private individual with her friends in a flat in London and working as a kindergarten teacher. She expresses her deep misgivings about her marriage to Prince Charles even before their wedding day and was warned by her mother that the Royal Family's lifestyle may not suit her. Her subsequent deep unhappiness because of Prince Charles's love affair with Camilla Parker Bowles and indifference to her meant her marriage was doomed from the outset. Instead it became obvious to her very early on that she was cynically being used as a 'brood mare' to produce an heir and a spare. To make matters worse, she felt deep confusion at being propelled into the media spotlight without any support from the Royal Family and jealousy from her husband at being overshadowed by her popularity with the public. Her fragile emotional state led to her bulimia and suicide attempts. Despite all this she was courageous with the charities she supported, such as AIDS, the homeless and support of landmine victims. She clearly grew into her role as Princess of Wales and demonstrated that she was kind, compassionate and a deeply intuitive woman with a sense of destiny. These qualities greatly influenced her sons and their upbringing and left a lasting legacy which has impacted the current monarchy and the way it has had to reinvent itself since her death. Her story, although a tragic one, touched all who knew her personally and those of her public who were deeply affected by her suffering and untimely death.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars its only ok, 9 Nov. 2013
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It only ok because its not wholly written in her words. It begins with her words for a while...then reverts to the biographer's words. The title "In her own words" belies the truth of this book. Also very repetitive thoughout...a complete let down.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I never thought I'd enjoy it, 17 Aug. 2014
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Downloaded on a whim and found it interesting. I often wonder how different the uk would be if she lived. She shook the hand of a man with aids and changed the whole perception of the disease. Whatever people think of her at least was honest
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Died In A Nasty Accident, 26 Oct. 2013
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The book flows along easily enough but because the first part is in Diana's words it feels like he's not telling me anything new, he also uses a lot of flowery words which made me cringe at times because it was just so cheesy! But I guess as Diana wanted him to oversee the telling of her story then I should just go with the flow.........and I did.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, 21 Jun. 2011
This review is from: Diana: Her True Story - In Her Own Words (Paperback)
Maybe its having read this so many years after its original release and remembering the original hype that adds to the disappointment, but I genuinely thought I would discover a true insight into the late princess as she had imput into the writing. However, if anything I found it repetitive and at times, written almost as if there was no 'insider' information. I don't feel I gained any new information about the Princess and her life which is a shame.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very good, 5 Jun. 2015
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I actually found this book very interesting and informative. I thought I had read everything there was on this subject in the newspapers over the years but put together by Andrew Morton I formed a more comprehensive image of her. She was so young, naive, frail and with the optimism of youth that sometimes leads to irresponsible behaviour. This meant, given the opportunity, she could have matured into a strong and responsible person. I feel she was not given the chance given the world she entered. She obviously did not get enough support and guidance in those early years so at times her behaviour became irrational. She had many strong and firm views that were a credit to her. If only she had been allowed to mature in a more loving and secure way she could have become a good influence in this country. I think Prince William is wise to keep close to the Middletons.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Frustrating at times, 25 July 2013
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It was certainly a good read and very shocking to hear about how she was treated by the royal family but I would have appreciated a more factual account highlighting her mistakes as well. It literally skimmed over her affairs and seemed to revere her as if she was a saint which I don't think paints an accurate view of her life.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sulky Girl, 20 Dec. 2012
This review is from: Diana: Her True Story (Hardcover)
"The Windsor boys [Charles and Andrew]... were never exciting enough for Sarah [Ferguson] in themselves, they just had exciting status."

The quote comes from Fergie Confidential - The Duchess of York's True Story, about Sarah Ferguson, another woman who married into the Windsor family in the 1980s, but it could almost as easily apply to Diana Spencer. Except that Diana Spencer, unlike Sarah Ferguson, was not a "commoner". She didn't really need the status.

Diana stood to inherit a considerable fortune, more than most of us will ever get. She had great looks. She had the world at her feet. Then she married Charles.

Why?

The opening chapter almost sets her up as a victim, or even a potential saint. Remember, this was a full five years before her death. Her brother Earl Spenser is quoted, "She strikes me as an immensely Christian figure and she has the strength which I think true Christians have and the direction in her life which others can envy; that sureness of her purpose and the strength of her character and position to do an enormous amount of good." Heck, if she had remained alive she might have become the next pope! Wasn't there a female pope years ago? There was Joan of Arc; she suffered and was then turned into a saint.

We also get Mother Theresa quipping in, "To heal other people you have to suffer yourself." What did she know? She was too busy giving support to criminals (like Charles Keating), and dictators like Baby Doc (or anyone else with money). Look at her ACTUAL WORDS, during a visit to Ireland, quoted by Christopher Hitchens in The Missionary Position: "Let us promise Our Lady [Mary mother of Jesus] who loves Ireland so much that we will never allow in this country a single abortion. And no contraceptives."

Diana apparently "nodded vigorously" to "Mother" Theresa's words about the need for suffering if you want to heal other people. I would have told her to keep her stupid mouth shut. That's the problem with this planet: too much attention given to too many people who speak utter nonsense.

I bought this book in a charity shop for £2; it's about all it's worth. It's a lot more sympathetic to Diana than some other books that I have read, Diana's Nightmare - The Family for example. But then you'd expect that, wouldn't you? After all, it was written with her permission.
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Diana: Her True Story - In Her Own Words
Diana: Her True Story - In Her Own Words by Andrew Morton (Paperback - 11 Aug. 2003)
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