Customer Reviews


4 Reviews
5 star:    (0)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Holds Your Interest!
"The Deerslayer" is the sequentially first in the Leatherstocking series of America's first, great, professional novelist, James Fenimore Cooper. I read it in preparation for a trip to Cooperstown, New York and I am glad that I did. Set in upstate New York in the 1740s, it provides the reader with an idolized introduction to the society of white and red of this colonial...
Published on 11 Jun 2006 by James Gallen

versus
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars a good book
This is the first in the series of five Leatherstocking Tales from James Fenimore Cooper, meaning the one where the character of Natty Bumpo is introduced as a young man. I once received the whole set of the tales as a child but never managed to read them to completion and am now doing just that. This is why I chose to read The Deerslayer first of all in order to get the...
Published on 18 Mar 2008 by Frank Bierbrauer


Most Helpful First | Newest First

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Holds Your Interest!, 11 Jun 2006
By 
James Gallen (St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
"The Deerslayer" is the sequentially first in the Leatherstocking series of America's first, great, professional novelist, James Fenimore Cooper. I read it in preparation for a trip to Cooperstown, New York and I am glad that I did. Set in upstate New York in the 1740s, it provides the reader with an idolized introduction to the society of white and red of this colonial frontier.

The criticisms that the dialogue and actions are totally unbelievable, while justified, do not detract from the story. While the simple, faith-filled actions of the "Feeble Minded Hetty" and the dialogue between Deerslayer and Chingachgook seem highly improbable, the do hold the readers' interest. While I am generally not one to pick up readily on character development, this novel is an exception. The contrast between Deerslayer and Chingachgook, the romance between Chingachgook and Wah-ta-Wah

, the romantic web among Judith, Hurry Harry and Deerslayer, and the varying responses to changes in circumstance coming from sisters Judith and Hetty all contribute to the persistent popularity of this work.

Despite all the criticisms directed against Cooper as to form, the one thing that cannot be denied is that this book is very difficult to put down. I found myself always wondering what would come next and what would happen to the characters whom I had come to know. Whether you are looking for an insight into early American literature or just a good story, your search should lead to "The Deerslayer". "
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars a good book, 18 Mar 2008
By 
Frank Bierbrauer (Manchester, Lancashire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the first in the series of five Leatherstocking Tales from James Fenimore Cooper, meaning the one where the character of Natty Bumpo is introduced as a young man. I once received the whole set of the tales as a child but never managed to read them to completion and am now doing just that. This is why I chose to read The Deerslayer first of all in order to get the chronology right.

The young Deerslayer, as his Delaware friends call him, has not yet gone on his first warpath and is in the process of doing so with his friend Chingachkook. Both have not yet faught an enemy and the novel is a good deal about this introduction to what it means to be living with the Native Americans of this time. It is also a good deal about the differences between the "white man" and the "red man". Natty is constantly pressing home the point that these two peoples are very different in the way they live their lives and he stresses how he is white and that he possesses his own "gifts" as does his indian friend.

It's fascinating simply because of the outmoded language used throughout, written in the way that a story needed to be in the 1800's. Considering that Cooper had written his first tale in 1823 there were not so many intervening years between the the 1750's and the early 1800's. In other words, history lingered and was not so distant. In this sense Cooper must have captured a good deal of the way of life of the time that he writes about.

The book has some weaknesses, for example: the actions taking place are often discussed in a long-winded manner when in fact quick thinking and little talking would have been the way these things were done since danger was close at hand and no time for such discussion would have been available when the slightest sound could have meant death. I disagree with the some of the other reviewers in that I do not consider the action scenes to be unrealistic. Stories of the trappers and hunters often tell of running battles where your wits kept you alive. Even then, to say the least, remarkable steadiness of Deerslayer under extreme circumstances is not unheard of although close to unbelievable.

A good book but it doesn't have the flowing movement of "The Last of the Mohicans".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Document of times past, 10 Oct 2007
By 
Didier (Ghent, Belgium) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Deerslayer (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Cooper's novel about the entrance into manhood of his hero Natty Bumppo (aka 'Leatherstocking' or 'Hawkeye') is no easy reading: the language is fairly obsolete, many of the morals and values Natty believes in and stands for are out-dated, and the action is at times incredible. But then again, there's no denying that this is also a well-written adventure story (one of the first), and has become part of the American heritage.

If you're looking for an entertaining book to read on some beach or other I'd suggest you look elsewhere, but if you have time on your hands and are interested in the origins of adventure literature this is a must read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A classic American saga begins, 16 Jan 2006
This review is from: The Deerslayer (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Chronologically the first of the Leatherstocking Tales about trapper Nathaniel Bumpo, this sets the feel for the rest of the series even though it wasn't the first one written. The Deerslayer of the title is Nathaniel who earns his name of "Hawkeye", for which he is more famous, in this book from the first enemy he ever kills. If the saga is read chronologically, "The Deerslayer" is a good introduction to the character of Natty Bumpo (although I read "The Last Of the Mohicans" first).
It is a story based around the themes of honesty, morality, understanding your own individuality and staying true to your values, told at the steady pace that James Fenimore Cooper uses in his other books. There are several plot parallels that can be drawn with some of his other works, especially "The Last Of The Mohicans", but to describe them would give too much of the plot away.
Although the book has its tense and exciting moments, the dreamy and picturesque style of the narrative can make it drag, and quite frankly I thought the story could have been told using maybe three-quarters of the paper. But that said the narrative does allow a lot of insight into the characters' mind-frames, which allows a greater empathy with them.
A good story but not really a page-turner.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Deerslayer (Wordsworth Classics)
The Deerslayer (Wordsworth Classics) by James Fenimore Cooper (Paperback - 30 Jun 1995)
1.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews