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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dubya Be - I had no idea
Over the last few months I have found myself writing a lot of poetry. This is something I've always dabbled in, but that seems lately to have acquired a new urgency and facility. As a result I have found myself reading a lot more poetry than I have at any point since my twenties when my early favourites were established (I've just turned fifty one). My recent reading...
Published on 11 May 2009 by John Ferngrove

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Messily done
Contrary to the title, this in fact contains no table of contents at all, nor title page or introduction, but launches straight into the poems. There seems to be a good selection arranged by date and publication, but no verse structure has been maintained, each poem is just one big block of text. This, along with some typos and the fact that a few of my favourites are...
Published on 26 April 2011 by auryx


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Messily done, 26 April 2011
Contrary to the title, this in fact contains no table of contents at all, nor title page or introduction, but launches straight into the poems. There seems to be a good selection arranged by date and publication, but no verse structure has been maintained, each poem is just one big block of text. This, along with some typos and the fact that a few of my favourites are missing, means I wouldn't recommend this version.
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32 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dubya Be - I had no idea, 11 May 2009
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John Ferngrove (Hants UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Collected Poems of W.B.Yeats (Wordsworth Poetry Library) (Paperback)
Over the last few months I have found myself writing a lot of poetry. This is something I've always dabbled in, but that seems lately to have acquired a new urgency and facility. As a result I have found myself reading a lot more poetry than I have at any point since my twenties when my early favourites were established (I've just turned fifty one). My recent reading has included the discovery of the excellent Tony Harrison, and a re-acquaintance with two early loves, Baudelaire and Rilke. I then found myself looking around for a new unfamiliar voice with which to engage. I had been introduced to several of Yeats' major poems at school, where they had made enough of an impression on me to still be able to recall sizeable chunks. Thus, I decided to give his Collected Poems a go.

I've been reading my poets cover to cover, and so I undertook to do the same with these. This took perhaps a week or so, and at the end I found myself rather under-whelmed, and rather glad to be finished. I couldn't understand the fuss. A Nobel laureate? The language seemed so quaint and un-spectacular, and yet he was considered modern? The references to Celtic myth were somewhat irritating, as what knowledge I had enjoyed in this area had grown stale with disuse. But most of all I found the meanings of the poems extremely obscure. Despite frequent re-readings I found I could make very little sense of by far the most of them. When I got to the end I had come to the conclusion that whatever reputation he enjoyed must have arisen from academic delight at obscurantism.

But just as I was about to put the book away, on a high shelf, I found myself with the feeling that I must have missed something. Surely such a reputation, guaranteed by the likes of Eliot and Auden couldn't be entirely without foundation? So, I decided to read them all again. This time I took them one at a time, very slowly, obliging myself to read and re-read each one, until I could untangle its meaning before proceeding to the next. Thus, it has taken me several weeks of careful, occasional reading, to get to the end of the book for this second time, with penetration to the meaning and music of some of these poems being a major personal intellectual challenge and achievement. The result has been a revelation and a completely new kind, for me, of poetic experience. I had no idea that you could work so hard reading a poem, and that the corresponding reward could be on the same level of intensity as that acquired from, say, an hour long symphony. I have realised that, until now, my appreciation of poetry has been confined to an overly imagistic level, with language assuming only a minor, secondary role. I have now learned that every word in a poem, no matter how seemingly small, is significant, and that the combination or juxtaposition of even familiar words can open up semantic spaces to which we have been inured by their unimaginative use in daily life. Reading this book has opened me up to a whole new artistic experience, and also, as a side benefit, completely altered my own poetic style of writing.

It is hard to communicate the love and affection I have come to feel for this man and his extraordinary mind, as one does after the most profound encounters with art.
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35 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, 4 Sep 1999
By A Customer
Yeats is without a doubt one of the most significant and influential poets of recent times, and probably the most important Anglo-Irish poet ever. His poems are deeply affecting, especially those concerning his unrequited love for Maud Gonne. They deal with diverse subjects like Irish politics of the time, the Republican movement, and more personal themes like love, growing old, death and the problems he saw facing an artist. My favourite poem is probably "Sailing To Byzantium;" "He Wishes For The Cloths Of Heaven" is beautiful too. I highly recommend this to anyone with even a passing interest in poetry.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Poetry, 30 Jan 2011
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I don't write this review for somebody to mark it and ask for references - we are not doing A Levels here!
So I just tell you why I like this poetry.

First, the canon of poetry is a strange thing. He is approved of by some process of sifting out the good from the bad of the past. But he is approved in part because of his Irish origins and his involvement in the birth of modern Ireland. Politics is at work. Nobody is innocent in these matters, and in some respects, there is a bad man lurking behind his poetic expressions. But no on is totally pure.

From the first, Yeats dwelt in the world beyond the senses. He wrote a book called A Vision in which he and his mystic wife communicated with a spirit guide. Ask yourself while reading: do you just like his phrases, or do you too want to go to this other world while you are still here below? Me, I want to follow Yeats there.

He was a founder of the Order of the Golden Dawn, and was an acquaintance of mad magicians like Alisdair Crowley. Yeats, in common terms, was very far out.

Yeats, by many accounts, took the other world of faeries and God very seriously. In his poems of middle age he proposes that the terrestrial life of human beings is ordered by the phases of the moon, or, in some way, by the effects of the moon. The true life is beyond the effects of this moon.

The wisest men are accounted fools in our earthly lifetime. He knew that he was a fool in other people's eyes. So he says that fools are the wise. He detested the ways of the world, the ways of industry, media, politics.

In the world of life, we are totally dominated by the effects of secret influences, we will be reborn, and our search for meaning will continue just as fruitlessly - until we recognise that we must become fools, hunchbacks, mad saints. Then, when the fool dies, his body will be thrown aside, and he will exceed this world and end up in paradise.

Did Yeats really believe this!?? Or did he make it up so that you could enjoy his short works about the cloths of heaven, and sailing?

There is no doubt that he believed in this scheme of moon, life and fools. My question is: are these beliefs to be confined to the inside of the covers of a book of old poems by a dead poet? Yeats considered that the poet's task is to say the foolish and the true together. He knew that the world is an illusion.

Those who submit to be dominated by the final phases of the waning moon, they will be considered fools, hunchbacks, saints, and they will live and also die and be shot out of life beyond the true cruelty of the earth.
See The Phases of the Moon

Aim to be reborn not as a human on earth - but as something else, he says.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Linked Table of Contents is masquerading as the 'cover', 23 May 2011
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There IS a fully linked Table of Contents in this version but it is masquerading as the 'cover'.

Select 'Got to...' from the menu and note that the option 'table of contents' is not selectable. However, if you select 'cover' from the 'Go to..' menu you will see the 'Table of Contents' instead of a cover!

The formatting of the text looks reasonable in that the line endings are correctly placed. If lines are too long to fit the reader, though, the the page can become messy but that is a limitation of any e-Reader I guess. The poems do follow on from each other and it would be better if each started on a new page. Most poem titles do start with bold text centred on the page which helps to keep poems separated.

There is a review of Blake on this page which is anomalous.

At 0.74 this has to be a good bargain even with the careless implementation of the Table of Contents.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars butchered, 29 Sep 2013
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I know this is a free download but you could have at least edited the text so the writings were in line and paragraph format.
Made some of my favorite poems into a difficult read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars W.B. Yeats, 15 May 2011
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This review is from: The Collected Poems of W.B.Yeats (Wordsworth Poetry Library) (Paperback)
"Weaving olden dances
Mingling hands and mingling glances
Till the moon has taken flight."

Isn't that just so beautifully put?
A wonderful collection from a wonderful poet. I was very happy to see that my favourite poems, 'The Stolen Child' and 'Into the Twilight', appear in this collection. I thoroughly recommend this to all lovers of poetry and Irish folklore.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AMAZING POETRY!!!!, 30 Aug 2011
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This review is from: The Collected Poems of W.B.Yeats (Wordsworth Poetry Library) (Paperback)
I am 13 years old, and was introduced to Yeats by my grandfather. I like poetry with a rhythm, poetry that is traditional and lyrical but which I can grasp. Yeats, as one of the best 20th century poets, fufills my quota. I love Down By The Salley Gardens, An Irish Airman Forsees His Death, The Lake Isle Of Innisfree and many of the other poems he wrote in his lifetime.
It is a clearly formatted edition of his poems, and apart from not liking the cover, I cannot fault this book. Lovely as an introduction to poetry.
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34 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Keats and Yeats are on your side (and Wilde's on mine)", 1 Mar 2003
I must be brief, as my lunch is dangerously close to completion, so here is my Yeats review condensed into a few points:
W.B. Yeats was the greatest poet of the 20th century, even if you only include the works he wrote after 1900.
Looking at his whole body of work, he was a genius and undoubtedly one of the great poets of literature.
Part of what makes him such a genius IMO is his range. At first Yeats seems to live up to how he is sketched - a modern-day (well, 20th century) romanticist with a love of mythology, etc. but then you keep reading and discover that his interests are much wider than just that.
Forget Jackson Pollack, Ernest Hemmingway, etc. - Yeats' life as a searcher for romanticism in a rational society is, I believe, the best model for an artist in modern times there is.
With Yeats, I think more so than other poets, his most minor, uncollected, obscure works are full of wonderful surprises (e.g. the one about H.G. Wells) and so it is important to get the most complete 'Complete Poems of W.B. Yeats as possible'. I read a copy of this very edition in my local library, and I believe this is very much comprehensive.
If you think Yeats had no command over the English language, then it is likely that you either (1) are not familar with modern poetry, which tends to avoid simple rhyming for rhyming's sake, (2) you do not have an eye for subtle nuance (e.g. the rhyming of a word with the exact same word in 'He Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven' stripping the verse of a love poem's usual artificiality and underlining its simplicity and naturalness) or (3) you just don't get Yeats and what he's trying to do.
If you like Yeats, your next port of call should be Seamus Heaney. Sometimes Heaney can write utterly opaquely about the most obscure subjects, but he has also written some amazing poetry. To put on my soundbite hat, Heaney is the mid-20th century's own Yeats, the post-Joyce Yeats.
The quotation in my title is from the Smiths' 'Cemetery Gates' if you're wondering, which you probably weren't.
In conclusion: Yeats is great. Is he better than Joyce? Hard to say, as they both wrote primarily in the media they were best at (though don't think I'm claiming any sort of expertise on Irish literature though! This is all IMO) - Yeats poetry, Joyce novels. Just don't assume that Joyce was the modern modernist one and Yeats was old-fashioned, as it isn't that easy.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yeats's Second Coming, 30 Jun 1997
By A Customer
It has long seemed that although Yeat is the best poet in English in our century, Eliot wrote the best poem. For "The Waste Land" captured a spiritual doubt and hunger that started between the wars and remained with us as a kind of heavy inertia; how can we make our lives meaningful, Eliot asked, and showed us that we have no idea where to start. But now such lethargy seems almost quaint; we don't now doubt what to do, but rather we do and doubt where it shall take us. What if all our global, unified and unifying efforts are taking us somewhere terrible? Yeats's poem "The Second Coming" now seems the true herald of our time.

Finneran's edition includes this poem in context, in its order in the development of Yeats's work. Read it as Yeat meant it to be read: followed by his equally great poem "A Prayer for my Daughter," where he offers hope in the beauty and innocence of personal ceremony. In a crowded, generic time, Yeats's poems are themselves ceremonies.
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