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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grand adventure in 1910s
Edward Malone, reporter for the Daily Gazette, finds himself caught up in the claims of the eccentric Professor G. E. Challenger to have found a South American plateau where dinosaurs still live. Malone volunteers for a fact-finding mission, along with the dubious Professor Summerlee and the fearless big game hunter Lord John Roxton. The band voyages to South America,...
Published on 1 Sep 2005 by Kurt A. Johnson

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars My Word
I feel a bit ambivalent about this collection of stories. On the one hand Conan Doyle had some remarkable and modern ideas. But oh my word, it's morality isn't for the faint hearted. I would tentatively suggest that Challenger probably isn't a character that modern readers would necessarily warm too.
Published 13 months ago by Neville Watkins


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grand adventure in 1910s, 1 Sep 2005
By 
Kurt A. Johnson (Marseilles, IL USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Edward Malone, reporter for the Daily Gazette, finds himself caught up in the claims of the eccentric Professor G. E. Challenger to have found a South American plateau where dinosaurs still live. Malone volunteers for a fact-finding mission, along with the dubious Professor Summerlee and the fearless big game hunter Lord John Roxton. The band voyages to South America, journeys to the plateau, and finds it filled with plants and animals for many different epochs. Finding themselves marooned on the plateau, the team faces many dangers and adventures.
While somewhat dated, this book is well written and exciting to read. As a matter of fact, part of the book's charm is its pre-Great War feel. If you like adventure stories, Arthur Conan Doyle, or big game hunters, then this book is for you!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The complete Professor Challenger, in all his glory., 3 Jun 2004
This review is from: The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Besides his Sherlock Holmes stories and his historical romances, Arthur Conan Doyle sometimes turned his fertile imagination to producing science fiction, most of it featuring the titanic Professor George Edward Challenger. This excellent Wordsworth volume collects all five of Conan Doyle's Professor Challenger adventures. And a very mixed bag they are - ranging from compelling adventure through intriguing pseudoscience to Spiritualist propaganda. I won't add anything to previous reviewers' praise for the justly famous "The Lost World", although I must say I reckon that Challenger's adventures among the dinosaurs of Maple White Land will still be read long after Michael Crichton's derivative works are all dust. (Anyway, I just can't forgive Crichton for using Doyle's title for the "Jurassic Park" sequel.) In "The Poison Belt", Challenger and co. hold ring-side seats for Armageddon, watching from inside an oxygen-tent as a change in the ether apparently poisons everybody else. (Doyle's vision of the poisoned world is worthy of H. G. Wells at his best.) Alas, "The Land of Mist" makes Challenger into a Spiritualist, and is very much from the Conan Doyle who believed in the Cottingley Fairies. Doyle lost his son and his brother in the Great War and these losses clearly affected his judgement. However, if you can get past "The Land of Mist", the two final stories are gems. In "The Disintegration Machine", Challenger jousts with a sinister inventor bent on world domination. Finally, in "When the World Screamed", Challenger shows an astonished world that the Earth is really a living thing, not unlike a giant sea-urchin. Doyle may not appear in many lists of great science-fiction writers, but the best Challenger stories are as entertaining as anything he wrote. (More of Doyle's science fiction and weird fiction can be found in the Wordsworth volume "Tales of Unease", which I also highly recommend.)
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Well, this is a mixed bag, 6 Nov 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Three short novels (well, The Poison Belt is a novella at most) and two short stories of wildly varying quality (but consistently compelling readability: at its worst, this is still Doyle). First up, The Lost World: almost too well known to need a review, this is a thrilling adventure story to which I was first introduced as an infant and have reread several times since, and ensures Doyle's place in the pantheon of science fiction's pioneers (although it arguably owes more to Rider Haggard than to Verne and Wells). It is THE dinosaur story, and let nobody tell you otherwise.
After this rattling yarn comes The Poison Belt, frankly a rather bizarre offering, with very little incident - in filmability stakes, the very reverse of The Lost World; but a clever and well-constructed piece, nonetheless. Make sure you read The Lost World first, and know and love the characters before embarking on the second novel with them.
And then... well, the previous reviewers have already ripped The Land of Mist to shreds, and deservedly so. It begins by stating that the previous novels were fictional but their characters real - the point being that Doyle wishes to dissociate this defence of Spiritualism from his works of science fiction, with which it is in fact unworthy to be classed. Somehow Challenger the radical has become a closed-minded reactionary, representing just the sort of scientists he confounded before; and there are many other inconsistencies. Some are minor (a poison whose name Challenger forgot in The Poison Belt, and cried "Excellent!" on being reminded, now turns out to be connected to a dark secret in his past); others more serious (the Challenger who in The Poison Belt referred to "the Great Gardener" and the "uncertainty" of what happens after death has been transformed into a convinced atheist - although, of course, he becomes a Spiritualist in the end). Two chapters rise above, or at least out of, the mire of Spiritualist propaganda: the one which deals with an exorcism attended by Ed Malone and Lord John Roxton has some of the earlier novels' sense of excitement and adventure; and that dealing with the home life of the fraudulent medium Silas Linden seems to belong in another book altogether. It exists because Doyle trod in Dickens' footsteps as a social reformer, and, indeed, it evokes Dickens' work: but the horrific scenes of child abuse contained therein will turn some readers' stomachs.
From this unwholesome fare we turn to the short stories - light-hearted offerings in the vein of The Lost World, crammed with Doyle's (and Challenger's) trademarks of wit, humour and utterly preposterous science. For these alone the book is worth the cover price (so far as I am aware, they are not available elsewhere, unlike the novels).
It might be wise, unless early twentieth-century Spiritualism and the follies into which even intelligent men could be led by it are an especial study of yours, to skip The Land of Mist; but the rest of this volume would be an ornament to any library.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I can�t summarise. See below., 11 May 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
I read "The Lost World" long ago - I expect you know the sort of book it is, and whether you will like it or not. But this volume also contains (so far as I am aware) all of the Professor Challenger fiction, and you just HAVE to read it, for its curiosity value, if for nothing else. I draw your attention in particular to "The Land of Mist". It's a bad novel, I admit: but I guarantee that you will be mesmerised by its sheer awfulness. Conan Doyle impudently reveals at the start that the events of "The Lost World" were a fabrication, that they never ocurred; the rest of the book concerns itself with spiritualism. Does it ever! Brave, noble, humble, intelligent and sane spiritualists abound (although there is one charlatan spiritualist who is cowardly, ignoble, arrogant, stupid and tending towards madness). We see how the evidence for spiritualism is overwhelming, and how only the most dastardly conspiracy of the popular press keeps it a secret; we see how bigotted the so-called men of science are; we see how the full machinery of the law is brought to bear to ruin the lives of innocent, hard-working ghost-conjurers. All in all it's hard to imagine a more thorough-going stretch of pure propaganda. (Please don't expect a story.) The cream of the jest is this: Conan Doyle may be biased, but he isn't dishonest (well - not exactly), and so his description of sceances makes it perfectly obvious exactly how he was being gulled. At any rate, if the thought of owning a copy of this appalling and unique book doesn't appeal to you, buy the volume anyway for "The Lost World" and "The Poisoned Belt".
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One man's descent from scientist to fanatic, 5 May 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
I agree entirely with the previous reviewer, but would add that the real surprise about The Land of Mist's fascinating awfulness is that the previous story - The Poison Belt - is one of Conan Doyle's most artful works. An exciting mix of comedy and adventure story, as befits the sequel to The Lost World, it is also a metaphysical joke, so self-aware that, had it been written a generation later, it would have been called 'post-Modern'. As for The Land of Mist, the previous reviewer is spot on when he points out that Doyle's 'honesty' exposes every supposed proof of spiritualism. Almost uniformly bad, the novel does spring to life whenever Prof. Challenger is introduced - he remained, even in this story, one of the great comic creations of the 20th century.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Buy, 28 May 2014
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This review is from: The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
All right so it was a couple of quid more than I originally thought it was going to be but given that it arrived early, was in excellent condition and was the complete and unabridged version, which is what I was hoping for, I can forgive the price. The cover art for this book is amazing and I can't wait to start reading it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Real Challenge!, 23 Feb 2014
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Peter A. Clark (Llandrindod Wells Powys UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Here is Conan Doyle in a different guise this time. Professor Challenger keeps the discerning reader enthralled with his adventures. A must read for Doyle lovers.
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4.0 out of 5 stars My son was recommended this book for his 11+ comprehension practice., 2 May 2013
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This review is from: The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
For under £2 this was a bargain! High Street bookshops were selling similar books for over £10! I highly recommend these Wordsworth Classics. The only downside is that the print is a little smaller than normal.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Remix, 24 Feb 2013
By 
N. Demir Kupeli (Ankara, Turkey) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Journal to the Center of the Earth by Verne which was also depicted by Rick Wakeman, a school drop off, twice, if you like progressive rock. It also initiated serious offences related to Mu Continent to Marines!!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good., 2 Jan 2013
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This review is from: The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
It was a good quality book containing the text I needed and a few extras - overall, I enjoyed it and it gave me the chance to read some other works of Conan-Doyle's.
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The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics)
The Lost World and Other Stories (Wordsworth Classics) by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Paperback - 5 April 1995)
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