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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Remarkably relevant even now
I had heard lots of good things about the Diary of a Nobody, but was not really sure I would enjoy this type of work so put off reading it. However, finally I got round to it and found a pleasant, amusing read which, whilst it didn't become one of my all time favourites, I am nevertheless glad I read. This edition contains not only the diary itself, but lots of the...
Published on 8 Dec 2011 by Stracs

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A great book printed nastily and on the cheap
This is a great book, and I thoroughly recommend it to anyone.

Just don't buy this edition. The cover is a cheap, blurry facsimile of a traditional cover, and the text itself might as well have been printed on a home printer. It is currently sitting on my desk covered up by other books, I'm so embarrassed to be seen with something so shoddy! Amazon published...
Published 19 months ago by Nick


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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A great book printed nastily and on the cheap, 7 Feb 2013
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This review is from: The Diary of a Nobody (Paperback)
This is a great book, and I thoroughly recommend it to anyone.

Just don't buy this edition. The cover is a cheap, blurry facsimile of a traditional cover, and the text itself might as well have been printed on a home printer. It is currently sitting on my desk covered up by other books, I'm so embarrassed to be seen with something so shoddy! Amazon published this edition themselves, and it shows how far they have to go before they actually understand the pleasure of a printed book. I really wish I'd checked the 'look inside' a little more carefully before ordering.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious!, 30 April 2007
This review is from: The Diary of a Nobody (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
I came across this perchance; it seemed interesting so I picked it up. I read it all in one go because I couldn't put it down, the humour was brilliant. The thing I love about Mr. Pooter is that we all know someone like him. He's not a bad sort but has social aspirations, likes to think highly of his own situation and is jealous of anyone that he feels shouldn't be on the same social footing as he is. Yet despite all this he's lovable. His entries were really comical; he's constantly felled by disaster followed by disaster. His servants cheat him, his grocer, laundrette etc. all "take the mick" out of him and mess up his orders; they none of them take him seriously and ensure he knows it. Some of his early entries had me laughing, he had planted some seeds and every day in the early entries he comments on the fact that nothing has come up yet. He reminds of an impatient child always grasping for attention and it's his childlike behaviour which I think is so appealing about the novel.

It's also a really easy read, if you've decided to take a sabbatical from wordy/lengthy/thinking novels; this is definitely the novel for you. It's also great as a way to kill time.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic of course, 28 July 2013
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What can you say about this comedy classic? It is a book that I have read several times and each time I enjoy it as much as the previous time. Pooter, of course, is the nobody who thinks he is a somebody - or at least tries to be a somebodyy. I'm sure at the time of publishing people were able to readily identify the character (it couldn't be themselves, of course), but now all these years later, I think it is interesting to note that essentially people are just the same, despite our perceived sophistication. Despite the apparent destruction of the class system, people remain social climbers, trying to show they are better than the next man (or woman), while remaining (willingly) trapped in their small domestic world, as a way of denying their true insignificance. The book describes human nature in a nutshell but not in a spiteful or critical way, but more by giving it an affectionate poke in the ribs, reminding us not to take ourselves too seriously. It's also clear that the generation gap is nothing new. A book everyone should read!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Every home should have a copy, 21 Jun 2013
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This review is from: The Diary of a Nobody (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
This is hilarious. I first read it fifty years ago. Then I introduced my son to it. It remains funny.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A GOOD READ, 15 Jun 2013
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This review is from: The Diary of a Nobody (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Really loved this book, was so funny. I took it away with me on a short break and needed something light and short to read, It came up to all expectations and just goes to show how life is the same today as it was then, and we are all human with the same kind of thoughts and feelings today on lifes idioms and situations .A GREAT READ
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pooter Again, 10 Jun 2013
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This review is from: The Diary of a Nobody (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
I reread this classic as result of the connection with Roger Mortimer's Dear Lupin, Letters to a Wayward Son, Lupin being the name of the son of Charles Pooter, the 'nobody' of the title. Pooter is one of literature's great comic characters and the book has many scenes that make you laugh out loud. But like all great comic characters he is presented subtly. Pompous, platitudinous, accident-prone, subserviant to his employer, maintaining respectability on the fringe of lower middle class poverty, he is at the same time principled, decent and finally loveable.

This is a great book now publishes at minimal cost. Make sure you read it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars classic humour, 25 Mar 2013
By 
Mrs Lofts "Polly" (Manchester England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Diary of a Nobody (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Really enjoyed this little classic. Considering it dated from the 1890s, the humour especially regarding the son Lupin, was quite modern in parts and funny in a very subtle way.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Toe-curlingly cringey but very amusing, 5 Sep 2011
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Nicola F (Nic) (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
I remember reading and liking this novel a few years ago and when I chanced across it in the library decided to give it another go to see if it was as funny as I recalled. I personally found it even more enjoyable this time and have since downloaded it for free to my kindle so I have a permanent copy.

The book is set in late Victorian London and focuses on the affable Charlie Pooter, an ordinary middle aged man who believes himself much funnier than he actually is and feels that the world on some level is conspiring against him which is demonstrated by the mishaps he repeatedly gets himself into. Chronicling his mundane life through his diary, he recaps encounters with friends, family and acquaintances, believing that his journal will perhaps be a literary masterpiece, when in actuality it is more a continual record of people who have slighted him and a long list of his embarrassing gaffes.

If you enjoy subtle British humour and wry characterisations about snobbery and social climbing then this is definitely a book you should try. I loved practically everything about this novel, in particular Charlie's unfunny jokes and puns which he and seemingly everyone around him, found to be utterly hilarious but were more cringey than anything else. I feel for his son Lupin, really I do. In today's society Charlie would undoubtedly be that embarrassing dad who is the first one up jiving at a party or humiliating him with corny stories in front of his mates. He is a really believable individual who you can emphasise with for all his fau paux's and endeavours but one who you would probably try your best to avoid at social gatherings (sorry Mr Pooter).

As far as diaries go, this is most certainly worth a look and it is a novel that has really stood the test of time which proves how witty and well written it actually is. Recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Oddly Endearing Comedy, 4 May 2011
By 
Katie Stevens "Ygraine" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
As the title suggests, the book is a fictionalised diary of fifteen months in the life of an ordinary man . Mr Charles Pooter is a middle class man, living in a typical London suburb, who works at a bank. As he goes about his daily life, his aspirations are constantly frustrated by his troubles with his workmates, his layabout son, the tradespeople and the blasted scraper outside his door.

The aspect of this book that I enjoyed best was definitely Mr Pooter himself. In spite of his pompous manner, his ineffectual nature, his jokes that fall flat and his highly inflated opinion of himself, I found him somehow endearing. I rarely sympathised with him, he often frustrated me, but I liked him nonetheless. His ill-advised notions (perhaps most delightfully deciding to paint everything with red enamel paint, leading to a rather bloody-looking bath after it dissolves in the hot water) often had me giggling. His constantly frustrated narration is rather entertaining.

I also appreciated the fact that not every entry was intended to be funny, which made it feel more like a real diary, with someone just recording the mundane things that had happened that day. Often these entries provided build up to an amusing anecdote, but it nonetheless adds a flavour of realism to an otherwise comic novel.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars timelessly sublime, 17 Sep 2010
By 
Alice May (Manchester, England) - See all my reviews
A reviewer of this book mentions Charles Pooter's 'painful dignity' - that's exactly what it is. I've read and reread this book for twenty years now, and it never gets any less toe-curlingly wonderful. Regardless of the era, the Grossmiths tap into what it means to be human with all our frailties and delusions; with a good dose of querulousness thrown in. It's incredibly succinct, too. Just look at the line about his (unacknowledged) hangover after a ball at the Mansion House: "Still a little shaky, with black specks." And if nothing else, you have to read it for the characters' names. I'll say nothing more than 'Daisy Mutlar'. If that doesn't make you laugh already, you don't deserve to read this.
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The Diary of a Nobody (Wordsworth Classics)
The Diary of a Nobody (Wordsworth Classics) by Weedon Grossmith (Paperback - 5 May 1994)
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