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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a magnificent tale of human suffering and redemption
"...the picturesque confusion of houses and the cathedral shone bright in the light of the moon, the day came coldly, looking like a dead face out of the sky."

I have been a fan of Dickens ever since the opening two paragraphs of Bleak House threw me into the Megalosaurus-inhabited foggy streets of London. To read any Dickens work is to be placed into the hands...
Published on 1 July 2009 by LittleMoon

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3.0 out of 5 stars Good book
Its a good book but it was a bit harder than I thought for my daughter. She is 11 and I wanted her to read dickens.
Published 1 month ago by nettyall


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a magnificent tale of human suffering and redemption, 1 July 2009
By 
LittleMoon (loving my life in the rain) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
"...the picturesque confusion of houses and the cathedral shone bright in the light of the moon, the day came coldly, looking like a dead face out of the sky."

I have been a fan of Dickens ever since the opening two paragraphs of Bleak House threw me into the Megalosaurus-inhabited foggy streets of London. To read any Dickens work is to be placed into the hands of one of the English language's masters; he is an unsurpassed genius of the sentence; a craftsman; a wordsmith and an artist. He is also, particularly in this work, a storyteller.

A Tale of Two Cities, in Dickens' own words, is "[T]he best story I have written" and is undoubtedly one of his most moving, exciting and memorable works. It builds with slow burning intensity, introducing us to the richly imagined characters who are to shape, and be shaped, by events far bigger, and with a greater sense of history, then they could ever imagine. Individual lives in London and Paris, are brought together with an inexorable sense of destiny, to one of literature's greatest finales, that is played out on the bloody streets of Paris, under the shadow of the guillotine.

Dickens' tale is filled with tragedy and despair, desperation and horror, but against this are pitted the greatest of human characteristics: loyalty, compassion, love and self-sacrifice. A Tale of Two Cities is responsible for some of the finest opening and closing lines in English literature, some of its most memorable characters, and an ending of such poignant intensity that even the hardest of hearts will weep.

[I always recommend Wordsworth Classics for the lay reader: cheap, unabridged, with accessible introductions, a glossary of the most important historical references, and this edition has the added bonus of wonderful illustrations by Phiz]
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Comments on this version, 30 Oct 2009
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D. Dalton (San Diego, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
I agree with other readers that 'A Tale of Two Cities' is a bit of a slog, but the plot is incredible and worth the effort. This inexpensive Wordsworth Classics edition kindly warns the reader not to read the introduction so as not to ruin the book's surprises; I appreciated this advice because I indeed did not know anything about the plot (I rarely read the academic intros to books for this very reason). However, one of the end notes gave away the big surprise of the plot about 2/3 through the book! Also, the end notes have incorrect page numbers. Overall I'd say skip the notes and use Google or Wikipedia to look up anything that you find overly confusing (I looked up several historical points to help me understand the bigger picture of the Revolution since I knew very little--I think Dickens understandably expected that his readers would have a certain amount of knowledge of those relatively recent events). I can't wholeheartedly recommend this version beyond the price.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Just lovin' it, 24 Sep 2011
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This review is from: A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Yes, I never thought I would say it but I love this book. I knew the opening lines but not much more but it is a great read and you really appreciate the genius of the writer and want to read some more. What more can I say.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the most powerful endings of any book, 14 Feb 2012
This review is from: A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
A book about the lead up to the French Revolution, and its consequences, A Tale Of Two Cities is a Dickens novel that dispenses with embroidered language and concentrates on action and the delivery of a strong moral message. The French aristocrats are portrayed as sneering and evil (with exceptions) and treat the poor as scarcely human. However, once the Revolution occurs the masses prove to be just as evil in their own way. The novel concentrates on a handful of key characters, all of whom are interlinked by marriage, friendship, or servitude. Key to the book is the fate of Charles Darnay, a young French aristocrat who moved to England well before the Revolution, anglicised his name, renounced his title, and earned his living honestly as a teacher. He is married to the only daughter of a French doctor who spent 18 years locked in the Bastille without charge - a victim of the old aristocratic regime. Darnay's life is placed in deep peril when he rushes to France to come to the aid of a former servant who has been thrown in prison. Despite Darnay's condemnation of the old regime he is nevertheless viewed as part of it. Can he possibly be saved by the ingenuity of a dissolute but keenly intelligent English barrister whose help some years back secured Darnay's release from an English court (and certain death) on a trumped up charge of spying for the French? I won't spoil the plot, but the ending of the book is one of the most powerful, memorable and moving pieces of writing I have ever come across.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quality, 21 Oct 2011
This review is from: A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Product was good value and arrived quickly - fast delivery with lowest price + free delivery : Looking forward to buy more products from this amazon.co.uk
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 9 July 2014
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This review is from: A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Great.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This book has everything, 1 July 2014
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This review is from: A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
It was the best of reads, it was the worst of read, it was a book of wisdom, it was a book of foolishness, it was the work of belief, it was the work of incredulity, it was the novel of Light, it was the novel of Darkness, it was my spring of hope, it was my winter of despair, I saw everything before me, I had nothing before me, it made me feel I was going direct to Heaven, it made me feel that I was going direct the other way – in short, the story was so far like the present story, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good book, 23 Jun 2014
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This review is from: A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Its a good book but it was a bit harder than I thought for my daughter. She is 11 and I wanted her to read dickens.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Another Classic on the shelf, 12 Feb 2014
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J. H. Blackhurst "jimbo7391" (Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
A great book to read. Real people not the TV trash of today.
Bought with the Bogarde film version which is equally classical
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5.0 out of 5 stars a Tale of two cities, 9 Feb 2014
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This review is from: A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
I loved the rich language which took a bit to get used to. the Story is historical, compelling and very interesting. Dickens at his best!
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A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics)
A Tale of Two Cities (Wordsworth Classics) by Charles Dickens (Paperback - 1999)
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