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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Verne the way he was meant to be read!
When I was a child I loved reading the stories of Julio Verne. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Journey to the Centre of the Earth and Around the World in 80 Days were my favorites. This new translation based on the original French texts is amazing, it moves quickly and I discovered things that I had never read in other English versions. You get more of Verne's politics here...
Published on 10 May 2007 by Kara Ortiez

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Small Print
Some time ago I decided to purchase books which I had read or seen films of in my youth. Treasure Island and Moby Dick were examples of this. Both were Wordsworth Classics and both were quite readable. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for this volume of Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea. I remembered the film ( with Kirk Douglas and James Mason) and wanted to...
Published on 31 Aug 2010 by J. D. Waters


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Aquatic Adventure to be Remembered!, 21 Mar 2001
By 
This Jules Verne classic is fit for all ages! Full of adventure, suspense, and dramatic purpose that only a master writer such as Verne can create. The submarine is introduced so later in the novel, giving the belief that the story will be another Moby Dick take-off and a battle between an aquatic monster. Not so! Throughout this novel, we meet the most important character Captain Nemo, and the rest is History. Go out and read the book or even watch the movie. Great stuff!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Captain Nemo..................period., 19 May 1999
By A Customer
This is one of my all-time favorite novels. I really like this book because of its descriptive ideas and interesting plot. Captain Nemo IS the best villian ever created. He draws you into the story by his intelect, then slams the door in your face with is rediculous temper. The many trips taken by the characters are a vivid trip through the underwater heavens below us. READ THIS BOOK!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent read, 16 April 2012
Excellent read - I bought this after being impressed with the Dead Dodo release of my favourite Kafka book, Metamorphosis. The translation was brilliant and again, I was delighted with the functionality of the menus. I am really enjoying building up my collection on Kindle with so much quality available for pennies. This one is a must - you won't be disappointed.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nemo, the original cyber-punk., 21 Jan 2011
By 
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea is a classic adventure-tale. It starts off with worldwide reports of a giant sea-creature which is damaging vessels off the coasts of most of the worlds continents. After much speculation and hypothesis, a boat is eventually sent to track this thing down and establish just what it is, and if it's possible to kill it. The main character is a French marine-bilogist who is aided by his Flemish manservant and a 'badass' Canadian whaler.
It's really well-written for 1875, Verne spares us too much self-indulgent prose and tends to keep to the point. He does like to describe everything in great detail at times, and isn't afraid to list off every species of algae known to him in order to convey how extensive Nemo's collections are. This is all for the purpose of setting the scene and showing just how remarkable Captain Nemo is. I don't want to ruin any of the plot so I'll leave it at that.

True, certain aspects of the book are not politically correct in the overtly sensitive era we are now living in. But to judge a book written 135 years ago by todays fickle standards, well that's completely stupid, not to mention pointless and self-gratifying.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A picture of the sea, 25 April 2010
A masterpiece certainly! I have just finished reading the original version. Although it is slow starting, it is quite an adventure which really captures the imagination. Jules paints such a vivid picture of the sea in your mind, you can almost smell it! The only thing I didn't like about this story was the information overkill. For a book aimed at children it seemed that there was a great deal of unnecessary facts about weight, height, velocity, etc. Whilst this extra information might add depth to the tale for an older teen or adult, young people do not seem to enjoy such attention to detail as it is harder for them to digest. The flip side of this is that if you were to dismiss these details or adapt this story too much, you would be missing the essence and life blood of the story. The old saying that 'the original is the best' is certainly true where this fabulous tale is concerned.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I am not what you would call a civilised man! I have done with society entirely... I do not therefore obey its laws.", 1 Oct 2009
By 
Sam Woodward (UK) - See all my reviews
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In Jules Verne's classic adventure story, a large & incredibly fast sea monster is attacking ships in oceans all over the world. When a marine professor is sent to investigate, he & his companions discover that the 'monster' is in fact an amazing submarine, built & captained by the mysterious mariner Nemo. Amazed by the Nautilus' advanced technology & charmed by its captain, the professor finds it impossible not to admire the very man who has taken him prisoner.

I picked this up after being intrigued by Alan Moore's portrayal of Captain Nemo in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen & I was not disappointed. The original Nemo is every bit as deep & unfathomable as the oceans he commands. Because of this, 20,000 Leagues is still a satisfying read, despite being rather dated in places. Of course, submarines are something which we tend to take for granted nowadays but the atmosphere Verne weaves had me just as mesmerised as the professor, when he's shown around the Nautilus for the first time.

Verne tends to go overboard with the details, merrily cataloguing the dimensions of the vessel, how much water it displaces & the co-ordinates at which various events take place, and so on. But despite this, Nemo's charisma along with the rousing adventure story at its heart made this book difficult to put down.

Looking at the various editions available on Amazon, it seems that many are marketed towards children. Because of the large amounts of detail & dated terminology, I would recommend buying a suitably edited version for pre-teens & would recommend the original for adults, who will get more out of the complex central character, while enjoying a good adventure story.

So despite being a little dated, a timeless heart beats within this novel. The true sign of a classic. As such, I had no hesitation in ordering the sequel The Mysterious Island (Forgotten Books).
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars For a novel set in a submarine, it's very dry., 20 Feb 2009
By 
A. Flynn "Travisparagus" (West Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
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Whilst 20,000 Leagues might have cut the literary mustard in the 1870s it really doesn't have the same sense of adventure as most modern novels. I appreciate that in the 1800s the idea of travelling under the sea would have been wildly fantastical, but in 2009 I feel I've been spoiled by the numerous BBC documentaries about the oceans' marine life.

In an effort to describe the wonders of the oceans Verne often strays from the narrative path, frequently resorting to dry lists of creatures, dates, or other factual information. It interrupts the flow of the story and they are quite jarring.

Aside from this the story itself was not particularly exciting, although the characters were interesting (especially the infamous Captain Nemo). Kudos to Verne for writing such a prophetic novel, but I feel it really hasn't stood the test of time.

Journey to the Center of the Earth is, in my opinion, a much better read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars good story., 18 Aug 2014
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This review is from: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Wordsworth Classics) (Paperback)
Well written, good story.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An underwater adventure, 7 Oct 2007
By 
M. A. Ramos (Florida USA) - See all my reviews
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When you consider that Mr. vernes wrote this undersea adventure about a submarine, when steam engines were the rage. And underwater boat was unheard of. By todays standards the book is not very exciting, but for its time it is very adventerous. The endless cataloging of the undersea life and the operation of the submarine all come out of the autor's head. There is one thing to note that I first read this book in grammer school and just re-read it. It is a shame that what was once considered a childrens book, has vocabulary that most of the Worlds High School students can not understand.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Belongs in the past, 28 Feb 2009
I am sure that my review will be considered heresy to many but I am fully aware that I am giving my honest opinions on a novel written well over a century ago and one that has been long cemented as a literary classic.
I probably should have got round to reading this `Boy's Own' adventure years ago, but I somehow never got around to it and when I eventually did it just seemed dull. Even classics age, and Verne's epic tale of what at first appears to be a giant sea monster terrorising ships, but which turns out to be something far more sinister, is both plodding and flabby. The Victorian style grated on me immensely, whilst the descriptions of the `sea monster' merely reflect Nineteenth Century ignorance and the age's desire for man to be Lord of all - whatever the cost.

By all means give this a go; it remains a ground-breaking science fiction novel and an example of how man felt about his place on the Earth at a time when the British Empire was at its height. However, don't expect to be thrilled; if you want an example of gripping Victorian drama that continues to resonate today, try Mary Shelley's Frankenstein instead.
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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Wordsworth Classics)
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Wordsworth Classics) by Jules Verne (Paperback - 5 May 1992)
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