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4.6 out of 5 stars
Jet Engines: Fundamentals of Theory, Design and Operation
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41 of 42 people found the following review helpful
on 11 December 2000
If you already know your way around a jet engine with your eyes closed then this book is probably not for you. For the rest of us this is a superb piece of work. Aimed at those with a thirst for knowledge of these fascinating engines, it explains in detail the concepts and minute workings of a jet engine. Starting with a broad outline of the concepts involved and taking the reader on a journey from intake to exhaust. At no point does the author patronise the reader, as the book demands concentration to expand knowledge and understanding. An education and an experience well worth your time and effort.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 15 December 2009
I am studying 3rd year MEng so I have learnt some thermodynamics and fluid mechanics which are touched on in this book.
Also, I have only read through about a third of the book so far so bear that in mind.

However, so far from what I see, I am very glad that the author includes quite a good number of diagrams of jet engines (nothing is more helpful in this kind of thing than good diagrams, and I have browsed through some other books that seem to be 95% text and 5% diagrams, which is silly so I didn't buy those).
However, it seems to me like rather than having a consistent set of diagrams explaining things in steps, he sort of just found a whole bunch that are vaguely relevant, but not complete, and more often than not, they don't quite go with the text.
For example, there are times when he throws in a random schematic of a really complicated engine when the text is just beginning on classifying the turbofan engine. Although interesting if you know what it is showing, if you are new to all this, it would only serve to confuse you. I feel that those kinds of specific engine schematics should probably be kept until a little later! But of course, that's just my opinion.

Furthermore, what I think is a diagramatical mistake:
When explaining thrust and the conservation of momentum equations, he has a diagram illustrating a turbojet engine with a control volume drawn out. The control volume in the diagram suggests that the horizontal exit boundary includes only the exit nozzle (with smaller area than the inlet, higher velocity and a different pressure), but then when he goes through the math, he includes the area around the nozzle at ambient pressure but not the momentum of this ambient air.
Since I am revising this stuff at the moment and was hoping that this would all easily make sense to me, but I got confused as to whether he was or was not supposed to include the air around the nozzle. I suspect he should since this air exerts a pressure on the engine casing. He is probably right in his analysis, but I really would have liked him to explain that step a bit more. Seems too much like hand waving to me.

And then a real bone headed mistake:
Page 42 says that the table 2-1 should be about derived units of measurement like the Newton, Joule, Watt and Pascal which it is. But then on page 43, it says to look at table 2-1 for imperial-metric conversion. But table 2-1 mentions nothing about converting to imperial!
I assume it should say Table 2-2 and have another table with conversions but this table is nowhere to be found.

Then again, I'm only a student! So the mistakes I supposedly spotted may be my mistake! If so, please forgive me.

Bottom line, I think the book is interesting to read if you're into the subject since it is basic enough that almost anyone with A-level math and physics knowledge could understand.
If like me, you are training in general engineering and you are interested in the subject, but they don't teach or examine you on it, it should be good to read. It may serve as a good example of the applications of some of the fluid and thermo stuff you learn.
However, it is not a textbook so don't treat it as such!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Extremely useful, some books you seem to find particularly helpful and this is definitely one of them for me. Thorough and well researched, with sufficient depth to answer real questions, but also quite a friendly read.

The only minor complaint which almost loses it half a star is that there could be more diagrams of different engines, especially more sections.

Still - a very good book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 20 January 2005
Excelent choise for the univ. student, the mechanical engineer who wishes to broaden his knowledge as well as the air-enthusiast.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 24 September 2013
Unlike most text books of this nature, Klaus Hunecke has predominantly used a qualitative method to explain the function and processes of a generic gas turbine engine. This method provides the intuition to whats physically occurring, whether it is the behavior of fluid or simply the layout of systems/components; this is something a quantitative text book just cannot provide (an equation cannot visually describe a vortex or pressure propagation). Therefore this book would appeal to both enthusiasts and industry/academic professionals (me). My only hunch with this book would be the fact it is becoming outdated (last updated 2003)...the case study engines and images are last generation unfortunately.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 25 March 2014
Great book! Very easy to understand even if, like me, its your first encounter with aerospace. Also is very cheap when you look at other books of the same type costing 70+
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on 21 June 2012
This book is a very informative read for those of an inquiring nature- and who amongst us hasn't gazed out of the window at 37,000 feet and wondered why the lump hanging on the wing doesn't appear to be doing anything. This book reveals that quite a lot is in fact 'going on'.
Inevitably there is some mathematics and important graphs, but nothing that a secondary school education shouldn't cover- even better if it was O-level maths!
The book is separated into chapters covering the main functioning areas of the jet engine with relevant pictures and photographs.
The only niggle is with the clarity of the line diagrams- these are too small and thus not at all clear. Each needed a whole page- maybe even collected together in the centre of the book and referred to in the text.
Over all- An excellent layman's reference book that leaves a feeling of awe, and a huge respect for the engineers that design these wonders.
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on 3 November 2013
As an aerospace engineer student, I found this highly useful and interesting especially since it includes the basic principles and ideas that I learn from my lectures. Furthermore It also evaluates the principles further which are not yet on my modules. Though for an average person this might be a little boring since it contains quite a bit of maths equation and "greek" symbols I still highly recommend it for everyone.
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on 28 October 2011
I bought this while studying the EASA B1.1 Module 15 earlier in 2011. I found it was similar to the notes that accompany te module, but this book expands on the notes and, in parts, has good detail.

The book itself is black and white meaning the photos are not 100% clear but they do accompany the text very well.

A book well worth buying if you are studying the EASA modules or have a keen interest in jet engines.
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on 18 December 2011
The book is accessible and clear in the explanations. Gives you an historical background and then proceeds to detail the internals of the jet engines. Math and formulas are kept to a minimum essential. Definitely recommended
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