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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 STORIES FOR PRICE OF 1
This contains;

-Batman A Death in The Family
Restored and recoloured artwork

also though it contains the full story Batman A Lonley Place Of Dying, with introduces Tim Drake as the third Robin. This story is out of print and is very expensive to get by it's self, it's better than Death in the Family too.

5/5 Really good by DC, 2...
Published on 7 Dec 2011 by George

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Joker finally wins!
SPOILERS

Joker busts out of Arkham Asylum (the place is useless, really) and heads to the Middle East to sell a cruise missile he's had in storage, and Batman follows to stop him. Meanwhile Jason Todd aka Robin is working through some emotional issues and finds out that the woman he thought was his mother wasn't his biological mother so he sets off to track...
Published on 4 May 2012 by Sam Quixote


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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 STORIES FOR PRICE OF 1, 7 Dec 2011
This contains;

-Batman A Death in The Family
Restored and recoloured artwork

also though it contains the full story Batman A Lonley Place Of Dying, with introduces Tim Drake as the third Robin. This story is out of print and is very expensive to get by it's self, it's better than Death in the Family too.

5/5 Really good by DC, 2 Classics for price of one!!!!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A turning point in the Batman mythos, 14 Nov 2001
This review is from: Batman: Death in the Family (Paperback)
This collection incorporates one of the most shocking and revolutionary events in comics history - the choice by the readers to kill off one of the most well-known characters in the DC world.
The storyline takes you along the second Robin's (Jason Todd) quest to find his real mother after Batman grounds him for being too reckless. His quest inevitably crosses the path of Batman's search for the Joker, who has managed to get his hands on a nuclear weapon, and the two aid each other in their tasks... with disasterous results for the young Jason, and a damaging impact on the Batman and his beliefs.
This is a fine addition to a Batman fan's collection, featuring Superman in a supporting role - being devil's advocate to the Government and providing Batman a source to pour out his grief - and setting the tone for the darker style of Batman comics during the 90s.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Turning Point which continues to have repercussions., 12 May 2004
By 
Joseph Barge (Bath, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Batman: Death in the Family (Paperback)
Jason Todd (the second Robin, after Dick Grayson) was never popular. In this collected edition he finally meets his death at the hands of the Joker. Readers were given the choice at the end of Issue 3 to vote on whether a badly beaten Jason Todd lived or died. I'm sure you can guess which way the vote went.
I didn't read much Batman when Jason Todd was alive but this tale is certainly a good read and will pretty much tell you everything you need to know about him. Anyone with an interest in the Batman Mythos should read this book as it is an important part of Batman's history. If anyone has read the recent 'Hush' storyline then you will see that Batman is still feeling the death of one of his partners now.
A further recommendation for anyone interested in other Morbid Batman stories is Alan Moore's 'The Killing Joke'.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A damn good read..., 29 Sep 2012
It get's a little eighties cartton style here and there but let's look at the better parts, it adds dimension to some if not all of the characters involved, we see what happened to the second robin and also included is the perhaps better story of Two-Face and Batman fighting whilst the third robin is introduced, a must have. The book itself is well designed with decent pages.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Joker finally wins!, 4 May 2012
By 
Sam Quixote - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Batman: Death in the Family (Paperback)
SPOILERS

Joker busts out of Arkham Asylum (the place is useless, really) and heads to the Middle East to sell a cruise missile he's had in storage, and Batman follows to stop him. Meanwhile Jason Todd aka Robin is working through some emotional issues and finds out that the woman he thought was his mother wasn't his biological mother so he sets off to track down his real mum.

I know this book is always on peoples' lists of "must-read" Batman stories but, besides Jason's death, there really isn't anything particularly good about this story. There are too many coincidences - Jason's search for his mother takes him to Israel, Lebanon, and Ethiopia, to find each of the three women who could potentially be his mum; these places also happen to be where the Joker goes to sell his missile/make money, and of course Batman and Robin cross paths in each instance!

Then there's the Joker. First off I hate how he's drawn in the `80s, his face is ridiculously long like an Easter Island sculpture. Second, I hate how his entire motivation in this book is money. I realise the Joker of the 21st century is far cooler, just think of that scene in "The Dark Knight" when Heath Ledger's Joker burns an enormous pile of money, but did Jim Starlin have to make his Joker so pathetically hung up on cash? In one scene when Joker's money is destroyed he slinks away in the shadows whining "My lovely money... whatever will I do now...?" - so pathetic.

And then there are the strange nuances with Batman and Robin. In the middle of a desert Batman and Robin take down Arab guards and don their gear, but they manage to pick the guards that suit their superhero outfits so Batman gets a blue robes and Robin red robes. Then Batman says something about covering a large amount of terrain using something that will make them "invisible" - hang-gliders! He reasons that anyone looking at them will think they're birds. Yeah, birds have jets don't they? Robin's outfit too is really stupid. Those bare legs and little green scaly shorts look so daft it's a wonder they got away with it for so long.

When Jason dies, Batman gives a summary of his life and gives a lame reason for wanting to have a child as a sidekick fighting criminals at night - "I guess I was just lonely". But he vows to "never again" allow a minor to help him fight villains as evil as Joker and Two-Face. Right, except right after this he meets Tim Drake and trains him to become the new Robin. Sigh... I don't know why Starlin tried to reason Robin into existence, just accept that it's weird but it is what it is. He's a colourful moving target to draw gunfire away from the guy dressed in black (or blue in this book). Move on.

I'll give credit to Starlin for making the death scene very stark and brutal, though the events afterwards that keep Batman from attacking Joker completely negate any of the impact because you're wondering how on earth such nonsense made it into print. The Joker becomes ambassador for Iran, that bugbear of Cold War 1980s America. Yes, ambassador. What absolute rubbish.

This is such a bad `80s comic book full of poor dialogue and plotting and that cheesy comic book style of drawing that instantly dates it, that it's amazing it's held in the high regard it is. It's reputation must be held up by aging fanboys who look back on this era with nostalgia and ignore the fact that the Batman books of this time (barring a few exceptions) were mostly terrible and can't hope to stand up to the generally high quality of the Batman books being written today. I suppose every Batman fan must read this if only for the mythology aspect of it, but it's not even the end of Jason Todd. He comes back in Judd Winick's "Under the Hood", so that the book's sombre and dark cover underlines the silliness of superhero comics in general - characters come back all the time, there are never any real endings.

Anybody looking for a fun Batman read will not find it here, nor is it a deserved classic; "A Death in the Family" is just a book that happens to have an event in it that some consider to be important but really isn't. Definitely missable, this is ultimately a disappointing read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars death in the family, 17 Nov 2009
By 
S. Francis (Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Batman: Death in the Family (Paperback)
Apart from the slightly kitsch feel to this graphic novel, I enjoyed it immensely. It was chilling, destroying and brilliant. Bring on more Batman!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars key turning point, 16 July 2003
By 
Mr. N. Shaikh - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Batman: Death in the Family (Paperback)
Dick Grayson was the original Robin, a sidekick to Batman with a cheerful costume and lots of witty banter to keep the Dark Knight from being overwhelmed by his depressing life. Grayson left for leadership of the Titans, and was replaced by Jason Todd. The writers originally intended for Jason to be fairly similar to Grayson, a basic character clone. But he started turning different by accident of the writing style, and readers started writing in, saying they hated him. SO the publishers gave readers a choice to write in- choose if Robin dies or not after an encounter with the Joker. And the readers phoned in and chose...
The shock value is a little diminished after 15 years but it's still an engrossing story of Jason's search for his real mother that ends rather badly. It is spoilt by ridiculous caricatures of Middle east people, with Iran choosing the Joker as its UN ambassador going a tad too far beyond reality, even for a comic book that was quite silly. The death of Jason resonates for a long time in the comics, with Batman being very cautious to ever risk anyone else's life in his war on crime.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Iconic Batman story, 13 Mar 2014
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Coming from the early years of the Modern Age of comics, this is an extremely dark story that shows Batman at perhaps his lowest point in his 75 year history. It should come as no surprise considering the title and cover that this story features the death of Robin, but this event is not the focus of the story, but rather how Batman deals with it. An essential read for any Batman fan.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful!, 22 Aug 2013
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Really good collection, I like very much the drawings too which is at least 50% important in case of any comic books. I recommend to all Batman lovers.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Huge classic, 24 May 2013
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This book is definitely worth a try, the storyline is great, very enjoyable, the characters are likable and funny when needed, the art is fantastic, it’s good to look at. I recommend this book to anyone who loves comics or just interested in getting to know the genre.
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