Customer Reviews


20 Reviews
5 star:
 (11)
4 star:
 (7)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Love Of High Places
Cicerone guide books have been around in my life through the passing
of many moons. Two of their smaller format editions have seen me through
three Himalayan tours and provided invaluable tips about via ferrata routes
in the Dolomites. Hamish Brown's comprehensive exploration of Morocco's
High Atlas mountains is a cracker too. Despite its size (it...
Published on 17 Jun 2012 by The Wolf

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Great author, not so taken with the book
Hamish Brown is something of a legend, and Cicerone produce some of the best guides to the hills you can get. This is no exception to each of their high standards - Mr Brown clearly knows these Mountains well, and shares his experience freely and generously. There are some great pictures to accompany the descriptions of the treks he's lead, with as maps of the areas and...
Published on 27 July 2012 by Many Beans


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Love Of High Places, 17 Jun 2012
By 
The Wolf (uk) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections) (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Cicerone guide books have been around in my life through the passing
of many moons. Two of their smaller format editions have seen me through
three Himalayan tours and provided invaluable tips about via ferrata routes
in the Dolomites. Hamish Brown's comprehensive exploration of Morocco's
High Atlas mountains is a cracker too. Despite its size (it wouldn't fit
in your pocket and is less sturdy than their smaller editions but if you
don't mind a bit of extra weight in your backpack it's still transportable)
it's chock-full of helpful and well-written information about the region.

I was previously unfamiliar with this range of mountains and Mr Brown's
travels there; his considerable knowledge (accrued over many visits) of
this beautiful country and its highly varied terrain and his own stunning
photographic record of his travels, would provide an invaluable aid to both
inexperienced and well-seasoned trekkers. His love for his subject is palpable.

Reading it has made me want to go there and you can't say better than that!

Highly Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Well Researched Book on the Atlas Mountains, 18 July 2012
By 
C. M. Cotton "Chris Cotton" (Europe and USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections) (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
If you enjoy trekking and walks in the wilderness, then "The High Atlas" invites you to explore a new, not often celebrated world. As simply put by the auther, Morocco is one of the world's most rewarding lands for mountain activities. The book presents a well-organized overview of the Atlas mountains. The author has extensive trekking and writing experience from all over the world, but the Atlas range is one of his most beloved regions. This is where he began trekking in 1965 with over 50 visits since, including a journey from one end of the Atlas to the other in 96 days in 1995.

The book begins with an introduction to trekking in the Atlas mountains, and then the bulk of the book gives descriptions of the author's own journeys; in total 48 treks are described. Route maps are included for each trek. At the end are five appendices - A: a glossary of universally used French and Berber words relevant to the subject matter; B: other potentially usefuly books; C: List of what to take D: Highest summits in the range E: Contact details of the author's own local guides (which could prove to be very useful).

It is easy to read, informative, and includes plenty of photos. To the uninitiated, it opens a new world of snowy mountains in Africa to dream of exploring. For those who have already traveled there, it will surely give new ideas of places to visit and useful information on how to make it happen. The book reignites the allure of the wilderness, remoteness, exploration, seeing wildlife, and enjoying the sun and hospitality of the Berbers.

If Kipling's everlasting whisper, "Something hidden. Go and find it. Go and look behind the Ranges - Something lost behind the Ranges. Lost and waiting for you. Go!" comes to you, then you will find this book to be a valuable guide.

Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Picturesque Primer, 24 May 2012
By 
Sentinel (Essex) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections) (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
As a fairly seasoned hill-walker in Britain (largely Scotland), my only experience abroad has been in the Valais region of Switzerland, and the East Appalachians in New England. Initially, in my ignorance, I thought Hamish Brown's new guide 'The High Atlas' was a niche area captured by this photographic guide to some 48 routes. However, I'm now aware that the competition is considerable, with both Alan Palmer Moroccan Atlas - The Trekking Guide and Des Clark Mountaineering in the Moroccan High Atlas (Cicerone Guides) covering similar ground, not to mention the admired Lonely Planet Morocco: Country Guide (Lonely Planet Country Guides) and Rough Guide The Rough Guide to Morocco. Given I haven't read any of these, I'll simply have to review this on its own merits, so apologies for that.

At 221 pages (including appendix, but strangely no index), it is lavishly illustrated in colour throughout, snow-cloaked splendour contrasting with reddish, arid terrain. The plethora of photographs (almost one per page, sometimes covering the whole page) reflect Brown's almost 50 years of annual visits, and help capture something of the culture and the characters amidst the dominance of the High Atlas landscape. Many had me licking my lips, while others like the vertical ascent of the Todra Gorge had my palms sweating!

Helpfully, each route is also very briefly summarised in an inset box, with info. about 'commitment level', maps, travel, access, local resources etc. However, all this takes up space, so that I found the description of the treks themselves disappointingly brief, and partly anecdotal rather than descriptive. Nor was I impressed by the rudimentary maps, which do little more than indicate the overall shape of a ridge or plateau at best. To be fair to Brown, he does refer to appropriate maps, though acknowledges their quality 'is a problem'. I was reassured to hear that 'good visibility makes life much easier', and that he'd only had to use a compass twice over 50 years (a huge improvement over Scotland!).

In summary, this has the appearance of a picturesque primer, which can be used almost as a coffee table book, which lures you in with some spectacular landscapes. Once you're hooked, that's where the hard work of preparation needs to begin, and this can remain on the coffee table to await your triumphal return...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The High Atlas, 4 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections) (Paperback)
Stunning book, superb photographs bring it to life. Written in an easy manner, which still manages to convey important information re buses, roads and where to stay. I bought it as a book to dip into to remind me of places and experiences, in the High Atlas or the Jebel Sahro. Very nice book indeed. It does not intend to be a precise guide, which is fair enough, but it is very inviting and helpful.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Hamish is great, 28 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections) (Paperback)
Really, this book contains loads of great advice and images. It's more than just a guidebook you'll want to keep it for your whole life along with your great experiences of Morocco.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A taste of the Atlas, 14 May 2013
By 
Pompom (Devon) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections) (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Cicerone guidebooks are always highly reliable. This one draws you to the High Atlas and suggests a range of treks and climbs, from the gentle to the challenging. Highly recommended - just need to get out there now!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Fine book, 22 Nov 2012
This review is from: The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections) (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A fine book by Hamish that makes a change from his Scotland ones. Plenty of info and colour photos make this a 'dip into' book whereas his previous ones have been more traditional books. I would say this is more like a guide book than an account of his travels so good for info on your own trips.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A Perfect Initial Planning Guide from a respected name, 15 Aug 2012
By 
Wobette (The Wild West) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections) (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Cicerone Guides are among the best you can buy when planning treks and this book by Hamish Brown covering a wide range of treks from gentle one day hikes to treks to higher peaks which will reward you with amazing views and vistas.

As other reviewers have stated, its a bit too big to take with you but this book is perfect as a first planning tool, to help identify the treks over a whole holiday and will allow you to plan routes, maps and rest stops.

Hamish Brown's love and knowledge of the area comes through this book and his enthusiasm and understanding of what the users wants to read to inspire them to explore the area is evident..

It is also full of beautiful pictures of the peaks and the world around them.

Perfect for anyone who wants to explore this part of Morocco further or want a momento from a previous trip.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Great author, not so taken with the book, 27 July 2012
By 
Many Beans (York) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections) (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Hamish Brown is something of a legend, and Cicerone produce some of the best guides to the hills you can get. This is no exception to each of their high standards - Mr Brown clearly knows these Mountains well, and shares his experience freely and generously. There are some great pictures to accompany the descriptions of the treks he's lead, with as maps of the areas and a host of supporting information.

This is probably too big to take as a field guide - you might use this to supplement an expedition, but my guess would be that if you're heading for somewhere as out of the way as the High Atlas you're either fairly experienced already or rather reckless. Either way, I hope you'd have more to support the trip than this alone, although it wouldn't be a bad start. It's organised as descriptions and ancedotes of expeditions rather than being a guide as such, and is halfway between being a guide book and a collection of expedition tales. Perhaps because of this, I found it hard to appreciate as much as some others - probably because the author is such a competent leader the expeditions are less eventful than those of less skilled climbers, such as Eric Newby (see the excellent A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush). So whilst there's an awful lot of experience here, this one didn't really grab me as much as I expected. A good book - just not for me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Enthusiastic and personal approach to tempt the mountain lover, 26 July 2012
By 
bomble "bomble" (Cambridge, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections) (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Whether or not you like this book will largely depend on how you like your mountain guide-books to present themselves. This is a personal account of HB's escapades in a land he evidently adores, formalised into a list of recommended routes. It is not the dry matter of a topographic guide nor the diarist style of a travelogue but something in between.

I have seen some criticism of the mixed standard of the photos but this is to miss the point in my opinion. The one objective here is to encourage the reader to visit this spectacular place as Brown has done time and time again. Seeing an enthusiast's slightly amateur shots reminds me that this isn't Lake Louise in Canada or Fujiama in Japan we are talking about. We aren't going to see the Atlas through a pro photographer's lens, enhanced by expensive post processing. We are going to see it as Hamish did with his friends and guides making cameos.

Maybe this isn't what the mass market want these days, but I'd say this book was a triumph of content over style and it has fueled my desire to visit the area enormously.

As I haven't been there, I can't comment on the accuracy though I do suspect that what HB considers trivial might prove challenging to most of us. I get the feeling that Brown wants us to be reminded that we should learn our mountaincraft in the cradle of our British hills before taking on some of these more inaccessible tops that may need a higher degree of commitment. Wise advice for all travellers who are known on occasion to forget to pack their better judgment.

Overall this is a book with a lot of personality and some very tempting routes. I hope someday to tick a few of them off!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The High Atlas: Treks and Climbs on Morocco's Biggest and Best Mountains (Collections)
£15.56
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews