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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 30 January 2003
Antonio doesn't have much going for him except that he has more than a passing resemblence to Frank Sinatra. His wife has left him. He is working as a night porter in a seedy hotel. He decides to join a lonely heart's club. The fun starts.
This book is similar to those of Bukowski, and the Fante's father and son. It gives a low-life's view of the city, the drinkers, the prostitutes, the characters that exist on the outskirts of society.
The book is funny. Antonio is an absurd hero. Things happen to him. He gets himself in situations he appears to have no control of - he meets a fat drag queen, a Jewish dwarf, a lonely widow and her psycho son.
I read this book in one sitting. It should be a classis. It should be a book that everybody buys. Do so.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 23 January 2007
Set in the seedy underbelly of pre-Olympic Barcelona, Nuñez's enduring tale of love, lust and loneliness centres on Antonio `Frankie' Castro, night porter in a run down hotel, as he searches for someone to love through the ads in a lonely hearts brochure. When the contacts become more and more bizarre, from a frumpy housewife with a psychotic son to a poetry-writing dwarf looking to lose her virginity, Frankie's life starts to spiral out of his control, until one moment of happiness brings him out of his funk. Of course, disaster is never far away. With crisp, punchy prose and a truly absurd but somehow endearing fool at the heart of it, `The Lonely Hearts Club' is a study in macho pride - or the lack thereof - and human eccentricity, in a vivid cinematic landscape. Frankie is a Bukowski-esque character straight from the Trees Lounge bar. It's frighteningly simple, and simply good!
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on 14 November 2014
Love this book, its a bit saucy & tacky but I found it interesting and very funny! Brilliantly written too. Had a copy before & lent it out...hence buying another copy.
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