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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Conspiracy
Especially the beginning of the book is not very interesting and takes too long, unless you didn't know anything about the discovery of the boy-farao.
After this very long introduction Collins comes with some very interesting discoveries on the missing papyri from the grave of Tutankhamun. The presented facts are there and you can draw your own conclusion from these...
Published on 20 Oct. 2003 by Rolf Heynen

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointingly weak arguments
First, I am a professional research scientist who enjoys reading alternative theories as well as the accepted view. I think these authors generally provide a vital service to the sciences as they make sure the established views are constantly re-examined and need to be defended against logical attacks. I have read various books by Hancock, Bauval and Gilbert (e.g. The...
Published on 17 Jun. 2005 by Ren


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointingly weak arguments, 17 Jun. 2005
First, I am a professional research scientist who enjoys reading alternative theories as well as the accepted view. I think these authors generally provide a vital service to the sciences as they make sure the established views are constantly re-examined and need to be defended against logical attacks. I have read various books by Hancock, Bauval and Gilbert (e.g. The Orion Mystery) and have thoroughly enjoyed them as they have provided clear reasoned argument based on documented evidence that can be tested.
As a professional (published) scientist I know the level of logical reasoning required to defend your theories in front of fellow scientists and the general public. Unfortunately this book does not make extensive use of logic for the most crucial arguments. Words such as 'unquestionably' and 'undeniably' are used in many places where a detailed reasoning of how the authors formed their opinion would have been more useful. Such words are intellectual bullying of the highest order and should only conclude comprehensive argument, not replace it. Someone reading this book lazily will easily find themselves persuaded by such words as they don't want to appear unintelligent.
The book does not keep your eye on its aim, it is fragmented and contains very long winded sections that, even at the end of the book, leave the reader asking 'why?'. For example the largest section of the book demolishes the reputation of the very men they are depending on for their conspiracy theory. If these men are dishonest and disreputable, how can you base an entire book on one throwaway line they are quoted as saying? They start their concluding remarks on the conspiracy theory by acknowledging that there is absolutely no evidence for it at all - what use is such unfounded speculation to science?
They argue (fairly enough) that the exodus occurred during the Armana period and speculate from one quote that this was recorded on the missing papyri. They then speculate that the papyri may also prove that Canaan was never conquered. How can the papyri prove it didn't happen? They were sealed into the tomb for the next few thousand years just a few months or, at best, years after the proposed time of the exodus - surely not long enough for any wandering in the wilderness and conquering Canaan to happen!
Often the authors present various theories without ever leading the reader to which one they prefer, such as if Yahweh was derived from the sun-god of the Armana period or the moon-gods of the peoples of Canaan and Edom. While some may feel this helps the reader make their own mind up, the fact that they cannot convince themselves makes it impossible for them to convince me either way.
In support of the moon-god theory they quote shrines that were built centuries AFTER the exodus - not before, and ignore the fact that the biblical narrative does state that the peoples of Israel and Judah frequently turned to worship the gods of the surrounding area. They also quote various symbols found in locations near their suspected Mt Sinai to prove that the local deity was a moon-god. They list various forms it appears in including one surmounted by a crescent and one with rays emanating from it. They pick up on the crescent meaning moon-god, but completely ignore (without explanation) the one with rays. I would have liked to know why that can't represent a sun-god aspect to the deity. I could go on, but I won't bore you.
Overall a very disappointing book, which I found hard to read through to the finish. Some interesting facts, details and theories hidden deep among the wandering (appropriately enough!) narrative, but not enough to redeem the book.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Conspiracy, 20 Oct. 2003
By 
Rolf Heynen (Nuenen, Netherlands) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Tutankhamun - The Exodus Conspiracy: The Truth Behind Archaeologys Greatest Mystery (Hardcover)
Especially the beginning of the book is not very interesting and takes too long, unless you didn't know anything about the discovery of the boy-farao.
After this very long introduction Collins comes with some very interesting discoveries on the missing papyri from the grave of Tutankhamun. The presented facts are there and you can draw your own conclusion from these facts. It's worth reading if you like to know more about this and more historical facts from around this time.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Self-serving and Groundless, 25 July 2005
By A Customer
To start with, this book seemed like a really interesting piece of archeological literature. However, the majority of this book seems to be based upon a single premise: Apparently, a threat was made by Howard Carter to the authorities, which was to reveal what "REALLY" happened during the Exodus of the isrealites. With zero evidence (or presumeably, because the authors don't refer to any) they cheerfully rewrite history. As the book progresses they pull down other bits of history, which doesn't, unfortunately, tie in with the view of history which they, themselves have constructed!
This sounds a it long-winded. It basically goes as follows:
Standard History -> Howard Carter complains about something -> Authors make up altenate version of history (with no evidence) -> Authors pull more of history apart (based on their theory) without any evidence (still!).
The book even says at some point that the established written histroy can't be correct (this is the best bit:)DESPITE the archeological record that strongly supports it, because it contradicts their theory, which is so shockingly self-serving, while not being based on any evidence at all, that I am truly amazed at their audacity.
Unsurpirsiblyu
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very plausible investigation, 13 Feb. 2004
By A Customer
Collins and Ogilvie-Herald present a very plausible investigation into, not only the real story of the discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb, but also the significance of his 'lost' papyri. The level of research, detail and presentation is quite impressive and this alone makes the book worth reading, whether or not you agree with their conclusions.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Food for thought in Palestine., 24 Dec. 2012
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This review is from: Tutankhamun - The Exodus Conspiracy: The Truth Behind Archaeologys Greatest Mystery (Hardcover)
Well documented history giving an alternative account of the Israel exodus from Egypt.Excellent reading.Informative as this book is,it won't go down well in Israel.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tomb Raiders missing Papyri?, 15 Aug. 2006
By 
Mr. M. A. Bowles "Scientist" (Lincolnshire, England) - See all my reviews
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I am very disappointed with this hefty tome because it appeared to promise so much but only provided dubious second hand information, hearsay, speculation, and theories regarding an alleged `Tutankhamun's missing Papyri'. After wading through almost 300 pages, the key piece of evidence referred to as `the missing papyri' fails to be presented to the reader and the whole thesis cascades like a domino sequence. I would suspect a body such as the Crown Prosecution Service would regard the evidence for its existence as unsafe. Unfortunately for me, it was like a star witness for the prosecution failing to turn up in court with the details on the smoking gun.

Those readers familiar with the generally accepted facts of the Amarna period and the discovery of Tutankhamum will have problems accepting the conspiracy theory. Where it is suspected Howard Carter and his associates crossed the line by entering parts of Tutankhamum's Tomb before the official dates there is evidence to help support this; such as Harry Burton's photograph (GB7282) allegedly of a hole resealed by Carter between the tomb's Antechamber and Burial Chamber. However, the conspiracy spirals out of control with the missing papyri speculation allegedly detailing the Biblical Exodus but this is never provided for the reader to analyze.

I appreciate the authors have put in a lot of time and effort in producing this work but I would have appreciated a slimmer book detailing the key pieces of evidence. Some of the discussions regarding such themes as séances at Highclere Castle for me didn't add a great deal to their theory. I would imagine the majority of readers would find the book long winded and difficult to read because of the lack of guidance by the authors on what they are really trying to tell you. Where they are trying to communicate speculation the choice of language is rather strong intimating the information provided is peer reviewed and generally accepted as fact when it is not. The authors also refer to other authors with similar speculative information and this leads to confusion.

Any readers who are keen on anything associated with Tutankhamun will probably find the work interesting because of a fresh interpretation of what may have happened. However, anyone diving into this book without any previous knowledge may suffer from information overload and find difficulty separating generally accepted facts from speculation.
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8 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Save me from writing like this., 29 July 2003
By 
Fiona Messenger "honestfi" (North Wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tutankhamun - The Exodus Conspiracy: The Truth Behind Archaeologys Greatest Mystery (Hardcover)
Here are two things I dislike - malicious gossip and conspiracy theorists for profit. Don't get me wrong - I'm an open minded Christian who has never believed that Rameses was the pharoah of the Exodus, it was certainly much earlier and I base this opinion on the Bible.
I knew I was running in trouble when the author laboured far too long on the curse of Tut. Interesting though it is, he fails to convince me that it has much relevance, at least, it doesn't merit a couple of chapter's worth. He also loves to defame the people involved in the excavation of Tut's tomb. These people were no angels to be sure, but you can't help saying "so what" when its revealed that Carter entered the tomb before the 'official' opening.
Having slated a few, he then brings in material from authors and historians who have already had their theories disproved by other, better, and more reliable authors and historians and uses this to form his argument. And for good measure brings in a few snippets of mostly unsubstantiated gossip. Please. He reminds me of a stereotyped journalist from a tabloid rag. I can almost see his balding sweaty head, leather jacket and coughy laugh.
Buy this book if you like malicious gossip and ridiculous conspiracy theories. Don't buy it, if, like me, your intellect is not stored in a jar for special occasions. Buy 'Act Of God' by Graham Phillips or Pellegrino's 'Return To Sodom and Gomorrah', which at least allow you freedom of thought.
Yes, I hate the book that much.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 15 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: Tutankhamun - The Exodus Conspiracy: The Truth Behind Archaeologys Greatest Mystery (Hardcover)
Great value and service
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not so much Conspiracy, 20 July 2004
By 
T. R. Alexander (East Anglia, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Tutankhamun - The Exodus Conspiracy: The Truth Behind Archaeologys Greatest Mystery (Hardcover)
This book puts forward many interesting theories that I feel require more research but I feel its conclusions miss something and may leave something to be desired. The authers go to great length (maybe to much) about the cercomstances of Tutankhamun's descovoury and the events following it and it isn't untill the second half of the book that they begin to go into the main substance of the book.
The main gripe that I have with the book is it's title, the word Conspiracy insinuates a perposeful intention to cover up something and I do not feel that the authers do not put forward such a case.
All in all it is a reasonably good book, worthy of ferther study but with some suspect conclusions.
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Poor pseudo-history, 27 Mar. 2004
This type of work is extremely irritating. It masquerades as historical research when in fact it is just bunkum. The problem is many casual readers untrained in historical methodologies will accept it as fact. The whole book is built on an incident wherein Howard Carter supposedly ran into the British Consulates' office in Egypt in 1924 blackmailing the British Government into giving him the archaelogical concession for the Valley of the Kings or he would dramatically reveal ancient papyri proving the Israelites had no real claim to the Holy Land, which would upset the current delicate negotiations underlying the creation of a state of Israel. However, this "incident" was only ever attested to by 1 man (who had previously set up Carter's lecture tours). Various outrageous and insulting claims follow including citing ancient (biased) sources saying the Jews were a bunch of Egyptian and Asiatic lepers who had been expelled by Pharoah and thus the Exodus was really the Ancient Egyptians' way of getting rid of their human detritus. As if that dosen't leave a sickly enough feeling, poor scholarship totally sinks any remaining claim to historical veracity when the authors start citing medieval texts proving Scotland was colonised by Ancient Egyptians! The modern-day counterparts of Von Daniken - at least he found some interesting objects to photograph!
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