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348 of 358 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clear recipes, beautiful photographs and the real tastes of India
This is a beautiful book, with plenty of gorgeous photographs and clear recipes. Like in Rick Stein's Spain and Far Eastern Odyssey books, I particularly like the notes in the back of the book which include extras (such as recipes for garam masala, chat masala, naan etc) and information about ingredients, techniques and suppliers.

I've grown up on authentic...
Published 18 months ago by A. Weaver

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars I enjoyed occasionally watching the TV series
This is my fault. I enjoyed occasionally watching the TV series, but the book doesn't appeal because it makes no attempt at Indian authenticity - indeed takes pride in being unauthentic. I've no doubt there are lots of interesting recipes, but not for me (and perhaps I was wrong to think that it was a cookery book rather than a travelogue.) I will be taking it to the...
Published 1 month ago by Magherablade


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348 of 358 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clear recipes, beautiful photographs and the real tastes of India, 7 Jun 2013
By 
A. Weaver - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Rick Stein's India (Hardcover)
This is a beautiful book, with plenty of gorgeous photographs and clear recipes. Like in Rick Stein's Spain and Far Eastern Odyssey books, I particularly like the notes in the back of the book which include extras (such as recipes for garam masala, chat masala, naan etc) and information about ingredients, techniques and suppliers.

I've grown up on authentic Indian food but I've never managed to get my mum to write down proper recipes. The images and ingredients used in this book are close to my mum's food so this seems to bode well. The recipes don't use ready made pastes and Rick recommends grinding your own spices so if you prefer this authentic approach, this book is for you. It makes a huge difference to the flavour so personally I think it's worth doing.

So far I've made Tandoori fish and Vegetable Makhanawala, both of which turned out well. I did reduce the amount of fat in some recipes. but I think most people tweak curry recipes their own taste. I've made the garam masala, which is a bit time-consuming as you have to extract the cardamom seeds from the pods, but the aroma and richness of the result is worth it. You definitely need a spice grinder/cheap coffee mill to make it. I've also made the kedgeree with its more delicate Anglo-Indian flavouring, the Lucknow roast leg of lamb, the pea and potato curry, chickpea curry, spicy scrambled eggs and spicy lentil soup with squash, tomato and green beans. All have been very tasty, although sadly I overcooked the lamb so it wasn't as tender as it should have been.

As I've worked my way through the recipes I've found that they use a lot of chilli powder for my taste. I like heat but not so much that it overpowers all the other flavours. Perhaps the powder I use is particularly hot but in general I've found that cutting the amount in the recipes by about half works for me. The beef vindaloo recipe says 2 tablepoons of chilli powder plus fresh chillies; I used 1 teaspoon of powder and no fresh chillies that was still quite hot!

Here is a list of all the recipes as they appear in the book:-

DHABA (street food):-

Millet and fenugreek flatbreads
Tibetan steamed dumplings (Episode 5: Rajasthan & Himachal Pradesh)
Tibetan steamed bread
White radish paratha
Green chilli and turmeric dhokla with prawns, curry leaves and mustard seeds
Spicy lentil soup with squash, tomato and green beans (Episode 3: Madurai & Kerala)
Vegetable pakoras (Episode 4: Lucknow & Punjab)
Mulligatawny soup (Episode 1: Kolkata & Chennai, Episode 6: Journey's end)
Spicy scrambled eggs
Sweet and tangy potato shreds
Prawn fritters with chutney and kachumber from the Allen kitchen, Kolkata (Episode 1: Kolkata & Chennai)
Pau bhaji (Episode 2: Mumbai & Pondicherry)
Kakori kebabs
Lamb samosas
Lamb koftas in yoghurt with cinnamon and chilli (Episode 5: Rajasthan & Himachal Pradesh)
Kati rolls with pickled onion and green chilli salad (Episode 1: Kolkata & Chennai)

SABZI (vegetable dishes):-

Tibetan noodle soup
Pepper and tomato sour soup
My breakfast bhaji
Smoky aubergine with tomato, ginger and fresh coriander
Seasonal vegetable curry
Dry-fried okra with garlic, cumin and garam masala (Episode 1: Kolkata & Chennai, Red Button)
Spinach curry with green chilli, yogurt and Indian cheese
Dry curry of cabbage, carrot and coconut (Episode 6: Journey's end)
Quick-fried beans, carrot and peas with freshly grated coconut
A creamy potato and asparagus curry with cinnamon, fennel and black cardamom
Vegetable makhanawala
Pea and potato curry with tomato and coriander (Episode 2: Mumbai & Pondicherry)
Potato and cauliflower curry (Episode 5: Rajasthan & Himachal Pradesh)
Vegetable and coconut stew
Butternut squash in sweet tamarind masala
Chickpea curry
Kidney bean curry (Episode 5: Rajasthan & Himachal Pradesh)
Vegetarian curry with Indian cheese, tomatoes and peppers (Episode 4: Lucknow & Punjab)
Whole eggs in coconut masala (Episode 1: Kolkata & Chennai)
Yellow dal with tomato, turmeric and fried Kashmiri chillies
Black dal
Sultan's pigeon pea dal
Tamarind rice
Egg roast en route to Thekkady
Morel pulao

MACCHI (fish):-

Dry prawn curry with kokum
Coconut prawn curry (Episode 1: Kolkata & Chennai)
Prawns with freshly grated coconut, green chillies and mustard seeds (Episode 1: Kolkata & Chennai)
Sauteed prawns and courgettes with salted lemon, coriander and basil (Episode 2: Mumbai & Pondicherry)
Prawn curry with green chillies from Calcutta
Prawn molee
Kavita's Madras prawn curry
Squid curry (Episode 2: Mumbai & Pondicherry)
Keralan seafood biryani
Fish curry with black cardamom, cinnamon, green chilli and coconut milk
Chettinad crab curry (Episode 6: Journey's end)
Mussel masala with coconut, ginger and green chillies
Mangalore lobster masala
Fish in a parcel with green chilli, ginger and coriander
Madras fish curry of snapper, tomato and tamarind (Episode 2: Mumbai & Pondicherry, Episode 6: Journey's end)
Amritsari fish
Sea bass pollichathu in banana leaf (Episode 3: Madurai & Kerala)
Hot smoked salmon kedgeree
Bombay salmon masala curry
Cod curry
Yesterday's fish curry
Bengali mustard fish curry (Episode 1: Kolkata & Chennai)
Tandoori fish with naans
Fish fry with garlic, cumin and kashmiri chilli (Episode 3: Madurai & Kerala)
Pondicherry mackerel fish fry

MURGH (chicken):-

Rocky's chicken korma (Episode 4: Lucknow & Punjab)
Chicken pasanda
Tandoori chicken
Chicken pickle
Chicken and apricot curry with potato straws (Episode 2: Mumbai & Pondicherry)
Chicken pulao
Sour berry chicken pulao (Episode 2: Mumbai & Pondicherry)
Chicken vindail (Episode 2: Mumbai & Pondicherry)
Roast chicken with cinnamon and nutmeg, with a pork, cardamom and cashew nut stuffing and spice-scented gravy
Butter chicken
Chicken and rosewater biryani (Episode 5: Rajasthan & Himachal Pradesh)
Chettinad chicken V
Chicken skewers and cardamom
Duck roast

GOSHT (meat):-

Shami kebabs (Episode 4: Lucknow & Punjab)
Lamb cutlets spiced with fennel (Episode 5: Rajasthan & Himachal Pradesh)
Red chilli lamb
Lamb and yoghurt curry with green chillies and sour plums
Lamb dopiaza
Lamb and sweet potato curry in onion masala
Lamb pulao (Episode 4: Lucknow & Punjab)
Lamb korma
Fried minced lamb with garlic, green chilli and coriander
Shepherd's pie as inspired by the Madras club
Mr Singh's slow-cooked lamb curry with cloves and cardamom
Cochin's first-class railway mutton curry (Episode 3: Madurai & Kerala)
Lamb rogan josh (Episode 6: Journey's end)
Leg of lamb with red chillies as cooked by hunters in Rajasthan (Episode 5: Rajasthan & Himachal Pradesh)
Roast spiced whole leg of lamb from Lucknow (Episode 4: Lucknow & Punjab)
White lamb curry
Beef vindaloo
British beef raj curry (Episode 1: Kolkata & Chennai)
Bife assado (Episode 2: Mumbai & Pondicherry, Red Button)
Amma's pork curry with green chillies and tamarind (Episode 3: Madurai & Kerala)

MEETHA (sweet):-

Bread and butter pudding Indian-style
Nimish (Episode 4: Lucknow & Punjab)
Sweet yellow rice with nuts and dried fruit from the Dham festival
Cardamom shortbread with chilled mango fool
Coconut, cardamom and pistachio ladoo
Jalebi
Cashew and jaggery kulfi scented with cardamom
Sweet milk pudding with vermicelli (Episode 3: Madurai & Kerala)
Masala chai
Lime and ginger cordial

INGREDIENTS mentioned in the glossary at the back:-

Ajwain seeds, Amchur, Asafoetida (hing), Beetroot powder, Bengal gram, Black salt, Cardamom, green and black, Cassia bark, Chana dal, Chicken, Chillies, fresh, Chillies, Kashmiri, Cinnamon, Cloves, Coconut flesh, Coconut milk and cream, Coconut oil, Coriander seeds, Cumin, Curry leaves, Dargarful (Kalpasi or stone flower), Dal, Fennel seeds, Fenugreek (methi) - seeds and leaves, Flour-chapati, Flour- chickpea (gram or besan), Flour- millet (bajra), Ghee, Ginger, Goat, Indian bay leaves (tej patta), Jaggery, Kashmiri chillies, Kokum, Lamb, Lentils, Mace, Mooli, Mung dal, Mustard oil, Mustard seeds (black and white/yellow), Mutton, Nigella seeds, Nutmeg and mace, Okra, Onions, Paneer, Peppercorns, Poppy seeds - white, Rice- basmati, Rosewater, Saffron, Screwpine, Shallots, Star anise, Tamarind, Toddy vinegar, Tomatoes, Tur dal, Turmeric, Urid, Yoghurt
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108 of 111 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you like authentic indian food, then this is a very good one to get, 31 Aug 2013
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This review is from: Rick Stein's India (Hardcover)
I am from India and have lived there most of my life but now living in the UK. I can vouch for the authentic recipes and experiences that Rick delivers. kathi rolls from Calcutta - the food for god. (I will one day open a restaurant in the UK which makes the authentic kathi roll to the Indian standard. I am delighted that there is finally a book published which evokes the smells and tastes of food at home, astonishing that its written by a non indian. Generally, I will never buy a book on Indian cooking written by anyone living outside India, however accomplished they maybe. To me they do not translate the authentic feel, texture and nuance of indian food without westernising it ever so slightly. So imagine my sheer delight at the series and the book by Mr. Stein. No offence to any existing or budding indian recipe writers. I cook well coming from a family of gourmets, and this book offered up most of the secrets to great authentic indian food that I have had passed down to me.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE new curry bible!, 21 Sep 2013
By 
Stroudy (Market Harborough) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Rick Stein's India (Hardcover)
Fantastic recipes that are easy to follow. A real variety of recipes and not the usual selection.
I have made around 50% of the recipes so far and all delicious.
This book is really aimed at those who want to cook REAL Indian food that is a great balance of flavours and creative use of spices.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very authentic, 14 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Rick Stein's India (Hardcover)
I have cooked many of the recipes in this book. I also have Atul Kochhur's book. I find Rick's book easier to work with, the other book you have to stop and make some additional masalas. This is not a problem but if you are in a hurry or doing more than one recipe it disrupts the flow. Be prepared to grind a lot of spices in order to get the real taste so invest in a coffee grinder. I like the little stories attached to the book which is typical Rick. It is not unknown for me to take receipe books to bed to familiarise myself with what's there, makes choices easier. I would recommend this book to buy. Be patient though and collect all your ingredients on a plate first ideally in the order they appear in the recipe, it makes life easier. Having seen the television programme which accompanies the book I can visualise things better. As awlays Rick is there with his little book so I guess the recipes are authentic. Having never been to India and often being told that the Indian restaurant food here is for the British palate I am pleased to learn how to cook properly.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Practical Recipes, Lots of Variety, 12 Sep 2014
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This review is from: Rick Stein's India (Hardcover)
This a well-produced hardcover book, which is what I want in my cookbooks, as I intend to use them. The font is big enough to read, and the recipes are clearly written. I'm tired of cookbooks that set the method in 8 point type, while the preliminary comment is in 14-point bold. There is a huge variety of recipes for all kinds of food, from street snacks to desserts, and in the main Stein manages to avoid repeating the same old stuff you will find in dozens of curry cookbooks. Another thing that delights me is that not one recipe says "refrigerate in the marinade overnight or as long as possible". (Yes, I'm looking right at YOU, Anjum Anand.) The longest marinade time in his recipes is one hour, and to my mind this makes more sense for the majority of cooks, many of whom have neither leisure nor facilities for recipes that take hours and hours. If you have the ingredients on hand, you can prepare any of these dishes in time for lunch. None of the thousand-step, complex recipes of The Hairy Bikers' Great Curries--a book that looked gorgeous when I bought it, but that I have never had time or space to use because of the complexity and expense involved in their "look at me" curries.

Now for the quibble: The brightly-coloured photos are gorgeous to look at, and chime with the "travelogue" nature of the original TV series, but they take up a lot of space in the book. I would have preferred labelled photos of each finished dish, in order of presentation. Several dishes are photographed, but they are not labelled, and at times you have to page back and forth to identify what you're looking at.

That said, the recipes are eminently useable by anyone with any experience cooking their own food from scratch. (If you're a member of the microwave readymeal generation, start with any of Anjum Anand's books and work your way up.) These recipes are simple, delicious, and they work if you know which side of a saucepan to put the food in.

I do object to Stein's ethnocentric TV-chef-god attitudes, like on page 266 where he has the temerity to state: "I reflected that I probably knew more about Goan vindaloo than they (his Bangladeshi guides) did", and the silly idea that there is something intrinsically "wonderful" about poverty that makes those who live one meal away from starvation not really mind it. His editors should have stepped in at that point.

As a cookbook, it works. And that's really what it's all about, at least for me.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you like Indian food get this book!, 12 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Rick Stein's India (Hardcover)
Purchased to try and make some more interesting and more authentic tasting dishes.
Book arrived promptly and was well packaged. Just as photographed.
It's a really great book and after watching the series on TV I couldn't wait to try some of the tasty sounding recipes. I have made a fair amount out of the book already and it has all gone down really well. I have choosen the easier recipes to start and all have been easy to prepare and tasted beautiful!
If you like Indian food get this book!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars recipe query, 17 Aug 2013
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brilliant book ,working our way through the superb recipes but can there really be 6 TABLESPOONS of ghee in the lamb dopiaza and one and a half TABLESPOONS of salt or is this a misprint! ?
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80 of 92 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb, 9 Jun 2013
By 
M. D. (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Rick Stein's India (Hardcover)
If you own and rate Rick Stein's Eastern Odyssey, you will absolutely love his India book. The format and lay out is kept the same, as well as stunning photographs of food and people and activities from India. Rick Stein manages to depict the essence of Indian cooking in his usual eloquent style and every recipe contains a short story about how the author has come across it, and interesting facts about it.

Like with Eastern Odyssey, the recipes in India are divided in several sections, namely:
- snacks/ starters
- vegetable dishes
- fish and shellfish dishes
- chicken and duck dishes
- dark meat curries, kormas, pulaos and biryanis
- indian desserts

The majority of the recipes are built around core number of ingredients, which once in your cupboard will enable you to cook most recipes with minimal effort. The core ingredients include: turmeric, cumin (ground and seeds), coriander (ground, seeds, fresh), cinnamon sticks, black mustard seeds (available from Asian shops), Kashmiri chillies (available from Asian shops), whole nutmeg, cardamom. It is increasingly evident that big supermarkets chains are catching up on their customers' interest in Asian cuisine. Generally I have found that most supermarkets stock up on more niche Indian ingredients, such as: caraway seeds, mace, ghee, chapatti and gram flour etc, usually located in their World sections. This makes cooking Asian food from scratch an enjoyable hobby that requires a lot less effort than it used to.

At the back of the book the author includes a few pages of basic sauces and marinades that are used in the majority of recipes. Those could be made in advance and stored in the fridge, often for up to 1 month.

As someone hugely interested in Asian food, what I find most remarkable about this book (as well as other Stein's cookery books), is his amazing ability to write a recipe in a way that makes it easy to replicate at home and most importantly, delivers the 'real' flavours of the region. I have often struggled to find authentic curry recipes in the past. Not anymore, the dishes I have tried from this book have been out of this world tasty.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rick Garam Masala Stein.., 9 July 2013
By 
Pjshaw "Peteski" (Hastings,UK) - See all my reviews
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Hes done it! Cracked out a great book that one can absorb and relate to both his experiences coupled with the TV programme ensuring a great read!
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35 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bahout Pasan Karta (Like it very much), 5 July 2013
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This review is from: Rick Stein's India (Hardcover)
I have watched the series of Rick Stein cooking in India; I like his genuine enthusiasm and have so far enjoyed all his series because he brings such obvious enjoyment and appreciation to what he experiences and cooks. India is dear to my heart and I wondered if it would work but it has....the photography is good and he has some special encounters. So....I bought the book and am delighted. Someone criticized it and said it looked cheap....NO it looks Indian with all the multi-coloured vivacity of India.

This book is a delight and he simplifies some things and educates as well. I already know how to cook Indian food from having been brought up there and with my annual returns to the Land of my birth but there is always something one learns and some of the spice combinations are very good. This is a book to enjoy and dive into and from which to extract information and apply as you think fit....I cannot eat chillies in the volumes he can!

Personally I consider the series may do a lot to encourage tourism to India and that is something dear to my heart.India The Peacock's Call by Dobbie, Aline ( AUTHOR ) Oct-01-2008 HardbackIndia: The Tiger's RoarIndia: The Elephant's Blessing: 1Quicklook at India (Quicklook Books)
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Rick Stein's India
Rick Stein's India by Rick Stein (Hardcover - 6 Jun 2013)
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